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November 16, 1975 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-11-16

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Pace Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 16, 1975

TH IHGNDIYSndy oebr1,17

Ii

THE RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE
WRITERS-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM
PRESENTS A READING BY
ARTURO VIVANTE
Noted Short Story Writer for THE NEW YORKER
Wednesday, Nov. 19 at 7:30 p.m.
in BENZINGER LIBRARY
(1st floor East Quad, E. Univ. btw. Hill and Willard)!
THE PUBLIC IS CORDIALLY INVITED
CAMPUS FORUM
a holiday special
PROBLEM DRINKING
Speaker: DR. EDITH GOMBERG
Professor UM School of Social Work

Jimmy Cliff:

The cult hero of reggae music,

(Continued from Page 3) As a boy in the village, Cliff: weeks there, he managed to en-
It -was at school that Cliff worked in banana and cane ter a talent show as a solo per-I
learned to fight. "It was a rough fields, cutting the products and former, without any back-up in-
school. You had to know how carrying them to huge piles. He struments.I
to defend yourself." Knowing had to work because his family "I didn't win, but I know I
how to handle himself with his was poor. His father was a tail- was the best at the contest. You'
fists and with weapons would or, and they lived in a one-room had to have a lot of friends to
come in handy when he moved wooden house. cheer for you, because the one
into the more dangerous areas Cliff got his first taste of the who got the most applause from
of Kingston. celebrated Jamaican marijuana the audience after everyone
And during the filming of The courtesy of a "rasta man" - a was finished playing would be
Harder They Come, it came in practitioner of the island's bib- the winner. And when you win
handy artistically. "The script lical religon. you had to share up all the mon-
I read originally was changed "There was a rasta man in ey with your friends. But there
a lot. (Director Perry) Henzel the village," he recalled, "just were no friends to cheer for me.
allowed me to ad-lib and change when the rasta men were com- "When I actually sang, I did
it around. He asked me how I ing into Jamaica. People were better than anybody else, but
would do this and that, and I scared of them because their when it came time for picking
did it naturally." hair was long. But I go with the winner, they had to cheer
When it came to portraying this rasta man for a long time, for their friends. I was a coun-
bly figts, Clfpayi" t and he taught me a lot about try boy, and everybody said,
bloody fights, eplayeithe the rastafarians. I'm not a 'Who's this country boy?'
that he had hmself fought. e rasta man myself. My parents "BUT I WENT back and I au-
"These dances in Jamaica," ditioned again, at another
he said, "these open air dances r THE RASTA religion holds re- theater, and I won this time.
with the big record playing sys- patriationto Africa as a I started winning a few. And
tems-they sometime get rough. goal for blacks. "He told me a then I got a recording contract,
You see them in The Harder date, and predicted that by then and a band, and made a record'
They Come, but on a smaller I would be repatriated. I wasn't out of a song called "Babylon
scale. You have to defend your-1 sure if I believed in him, but Downfall." It did alrightyou
self the best way you can. I when that date came and I know. It wasn't that big. But I
don't believe in turning the oth- wasn't repatriated, I was disil- didn't get any money for it; the
er cheek. lusioned.-producer didn't pay me any
"He asked me to act that part, "Herbs - well, he planted a moneyr
and I acted it. I did it the way little herb, and we'd smoke." Cliff told the story of how
it really would have happened."!D Cf e c e d he was cheated out of being

"My second producer gave
me money, but it wasn't until
the third one that I got a decent
amount. I think it was 10 pounds
which is about 25 dollars..
'THE THIRD PRODUCER
wasn't in the recording
business. All he had was a re-
cord shop. But after going to all
those other people who didn't
pay me, I suggested to him,
'Do you want to go into the
record business? I'm a singer.'
"He said, 'You're a singer?
Sing.' So I sang. We were with
his two brothers in the shop, and
the other brothers laughed at
me. But he didn't. He said,
'He's the best singer I've ever
heard.'
"He went into the business,
and after that he became the
biggest producer in Jamaica. I
got my first number one with
him."
At that time, Cliff was living
in the ghetto neighborhoods of
West Kingston. "When I first'

went to the city, I lived at East thought they were too shabby
Kingston with people I knew and raggedy. They wanted some
from the country. But I didn't slick people. So it couldn't hap-
feel comfortable with them. pen, because it wasn't the right
"At West Kingston, it wasn't thing." He was more successful
that posh a surrounding, but I in Europe and South America.
was more comfortable. And "Financially, I've done fairly
where I was living was behind alright. The career means more
one of those big halls where to me than the money. But I al-
they had dancing at least two ways wanted the money be-
nights a week. So that was cause I knew the necessity of it,
something good, because Ifrom growing up in that en-
could hear all the latest re- vironment and knowing what
cords. mionent cand knwig."a
"I started writing different ioney can do."
kinds of songs then. The West Cliff takes it in stridethat,
brought out more of the hard- so far, he's only a moderately
ness in me. < big star in America He's not
"Well," he continued, "then bitter about it, and he's not ob-
I started doing a lot of stage sessively seeking huge success.
work, and finally I left the is- He's only on his first tour here
land and started touring." in over a decade.
(LIFF TOURED the United:If the bets don't pay off, it
States in 1964, but he didn't'wont break him. But it looks
do too well. "We created the! like the odds are in his favor.
music out of the ghetto, but the
producers didn't want me to Stephen Hersh is a night edi-
use musicians from there. They tor at The Daily.

TUESDAY,
November 18
8:30 p.m.

=
CAMPUS
CHAPEL
a place for people
1236 WASHTENAW
one block north of
South University and Forest

k

Bootleg records: A booming
trade in Underground markets

f

i I

RAVEL MICH. UNION 763-214
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL
SKI PARK CITY, UTAH
Dec. 30-Jan. 6th
WE FEATURE:
" Non-stop American Airlines
let departing Metro Airport.j
* Ski lift tickets for 6 days atI
Park City Ski Resort.
0 Accommodations at Alpine Prospector's
Lodge in Park City.
1 $285/Quad, of
w $299/Double!
SIGN UP DEADLINE NOV. 19I
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 763-2147
COME TO 2nd FLOOR-MICH. UNION

CLIFF DIDN'T betray a trace
of bitterness about the
rough aspects of his life on thej
island - the poverty, the vio-
lence. They were simply facts
of life for him, that went along
with the things that made him
happy.

dealer, like the character in
the film?
"No. I smoke a lot, but I've,
never been involved in trading."
Cliff left Samata at the age of
14 for Kingston, ostensibly to
go to a technical college at
night. But his real hope was to
make it as a singer. After many

paid for his record. "I came to
him and I said, 'I come for my
money man."'
At this point, Cliff lapsed into
Jamaican dialect to relate the
conversation, the dialect in
which he spoke much of the dia-
logue of his film. It's nearly
incomprehensible to American
ears, and it was subtitled in the
movie.
The upshot of the conversa-
tion was that the producer was
willing to pay the singer one
shilling - 12 cents - and had
a bodyguard ready to throw him
out if he didn't think it was
enough money.
So Cliff walked out.

(Continued from Page 2)
ly powerless to stop the produc-
tion of underground records.
The copyright law in effect in
1971 was passed in 1909, long
before tape technology. Under
this statute, songs were copy-
righted, but not the tapes or
recordings of them.
With intensive pressure from
the music industry, Congress
passed an amendment to the
Copyrights Act which went into
effect in February, 1972, allow-
ing manufacturers to copyright
their recordings and making
unauthorized duplication a fed-
eral offense.

ATTENTION ALL SKIERS!
No Affinity Groups or Clubs to Joint
16-23, 1975 VIA UNITED AIRLINES CHARTER FLIGHT
$239. PER PERSON
SKI TOUR INCLUDES Round-trip, Detroit-Grand Junction
iet transportation; Gd. Jct.-Snowmass charter bus transfers;
deluxe loding seven nights - STONEBRIDGE INN or
WILDWOOD INN; three "Get-Acquainted" parties; tips
and taxes; fully escorted; lift tickets are optional; meals
not included.
MUST BE BOOKED BY DEC. 1, 1975
....---i -.----------------m w-"""- p mm m
Mlto - MD

Moil to:
M. GUERIN TOURS. INC.
4145 Gratiot Ave.
Port Huron, Michiqon 48060

WRITE OR CALL:
(313) 385-3521

The University of Michigan's Committee on
the Bicentennial and the College of Litera-
ture, Science and the Arts cordially invite the
public to attend a lecture
THE FATE OF THE GODS IN
A STRANGE NEW LAND:
RELIGION IN AMERICAN LIFE
by
MICHAEL NOVAK
Modern Languages Building
Lecture Room 4
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17-4:15

However, the national law specific statute on the books
applies only to the manufac- concerning retail sale of un-
turer, not to the distributor or derground LP's. Consequently,
retailer, although several states the state is a haven for retail-
- including Michigan - have ers; at least a dozen stores in
passed such. statutes. In many California regularly keep some
cases, however, the sellers of bootlegs in stock.
the underground merchandise Despite the fact that officials
are either not bothered by legal in the record industry describe
authorities or don't fall within the bootleg manufacturers, dis-
the scope of local laws. tributors, and retailers as noth-
"I'd have to admit that the ing more than a "pack of
main focus of our efforts have thieves," most people in the un-
been towards tracing material derground album business de-
back to the manufacturers, we scribe themselves as "Robin
rarely take action against stores: Hoods." They argue that they
who sell them .. . although you have established an "alterna-
can expect more action in this tive means of distribution" to
area in the future," says Jules the large corporations, accord-
Yarnell, who heads the anti- ing to an employe from Mo's
piracy division of the Record- Books and Records Store in
ing Industry Association of Berkeley.
America (RIAA). Nevertheless, the employe
NATURALLY, most- retailers also notes a recent "disturb-
are very reticent to discuss ing" trend in the bootleg busi-
how and from whom they obtain ness. She fear? t'at even stiff-
their recordings, and most er anti-bootleg laws may be at
avoid problems with the auth- hand, and that authorities may
orities by keeping quiet. "We've be more willing to crack down
simply never had those sorts of in the months to come.
legal troubles," states one em- "1t's becor'e very, very diffi-
ploye from Rasputin records in cult to get ahold of the bootleg
Berkeley, California, who also producers in the past six
points out that California has no months, she says. The employe
reveals that she often doesn't
-' _- - ---0 -A even know who the bootleggers
Featuring ' are; they simnly drop mater-
ials by when they're available.
Monday and Tuesday AN EMPLOYE from Rather-
at the hatRipped Records also notes
at thethat the underground manufac-
turers have kept a particular-
ly low profile in recent months,
'but he says the lull may be
only temporary. "After all, the
bootleggers have gone through
much more trying times in the
past and have survived," he ex-
plains.
J kTy wte

Gentlemen: Please send me your new O.T.O. Colorado
brochure.
Name -
Address
Ci-tv, State and Zip Codeo

L.

I

World's

Harvest

I AND NOW.'..

Announces the Opening of the New
BEER, WINE, and COCKTAILS
are now available
in World's Harvest's Lounge
or with your meal
in the Restaurant
HAPPY HOURS-Mon. thru Sat. 4-6 p.m.
1 4pR

I

I

The First Ever and Greatest Of All
p dithiat
Contest
DESIGN AN EMBLEM, CARTOON or DRAWING incor-
porating into its theme the Michiqan Football Wolverines
and their upcominq Bowl appearance. The winninq desiqn
will be reproduced in The Daily using special ink so that
students and all team supporters can IRON-ON your
artistic talents to the front of their t-shirts.
--RULES-
ELIGIBILITY: Anyone who supports U of M Football.
ARTWORK: no larder than 61" deep by 9" wide or
9" x 61"; black ink on white paper. Include name,
address and phone no. and bring or mail to The Michigan
Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104. ENTER
AS MANY DESIGNS AS YOU LIKE.
DEADLINE: 5:00 p.m., December 2.
For further information, call 764-0560 between 9-5
FIRST PRIZE: free dinner for 2 at one of Ann
Arbor's finest restaurants, P L U S $25 cash,
PLUS your design in The Daily using special
IRON-ON ink.
Second and Third Prizes will be acknowledged
and have their designs appear in The Daily
aseinn rennulnr ink.

i

Ann Arbor's
best Jazz Band

I

I

a

TUESDAY, NOV. 18-4 P.M.
Room 200, Lane Hall
NOTED ISRAELI NOVELIST
A. B. YEHOSHUA
TOPIC: "MODERN ISRAELI: WRITERS:
PROBLEMS OF WRITING AND IDENTITY"
Sponsored by Proaram of Judaic Studies & Dept. of Near
Eastern Studies.

Elec. Typewriter
rentals
AT university cellar

11

FIND BIG SAVINGS AT THE VAULT

SAVE

STEPS
MONEY,
TIME

I

ii

DRIVE IN-DRIVE STRAIGHT THRU
CHO )SE FROM OUR WIDE SELECTION OF
ICE COLD BEER and WINE-
Domestic & Imported
Champagne-Keg Beer-Cold Pop
Ice-Crushed, Cubed or Block
All From the Safety and Convenience of Your Car
FOR THE ECOLOGY MINDED . . .
We Accept Returnable Bottles
-OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK-
CORNER OF FIFTH AND CATHERINE

I I I I

d.* *,%.....e+
rI **: i~i** *'i i

t" 7O: C'1:>:~

I

I

i :

r,

41

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