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November 15, 1975 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-11-15

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Wage Eight.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

s{

Saturday, November 15, 1975

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Grif fin
reportedly
top choie
(Continued from Page 1)
burg, Fla., a member of the
5th Circuit in New Orleans;
Judge John Paul Stevens, of the
7th Circuit in Chicago; Judge
William Webster, of the8th
Circuit in St. Louis; and Judge
J. Clifford Wallace of San
Diego, a member of the 9th
Circuit in San Francisco.
Others reported by public ra-
dio to be on the list include Vin-
cent McKusick, a lawyer from
Portland, Maine; Judge Alfred
Goodwin, of Portland. Ore., a
member of the 9th Circuit in
San Francisco,and Dallin Oaks
of Provo, Utah, President of the
Brigham Young University Law
School.

College job mark~etFACTIONAL DISPUTE Ford says he cannot
College job mat Woodcock talks with clericals recall click of pistol

(Continued from Page 1)
tige of a position increases,
Sandler said.
During the economic crunch,
"women and minorities are the
first to be let go," she adds.
"The myth," Sandler empha-
sizes, "is that reverse descrim-
ination is endemic." In reality,
"few women and minorities are
being hired." Even if such pre-
ference were given, "it does in-
deed violate the law," she said.
SANDLER accused HEW of
playing "a major role in per-
petrating misconceptions" about
affirmative action. HEW "rat-
tles the saber", then retreats,
she said.
Women's studies classes have
drawn fire recently on "wheth-
er or not you can keep men
out," Sandler said. She believes

U GEIG.9 0q14'7 J(Continued from Page 1) local's bylaws, which establish such explanation for his some-
ness, while Unity Caucus de- the union local's political struc- what unusual involvement in the F(Continued from Page 1)
fendd th reiona boses'andFord was asked if he could
men may not be barred under fended the regional bosses' and ture. local's struggle. recall anything about Fronme's
the very laws which were de- their own role in the dispute, Woodcock voiced no support "I CAME because I was ask- face when he first saw her.
signed to protect women. said Lisa North, another CDU or opposition to the four bylaws ed to," said Woodcock. "They "Was it flushed, pale, weath-
The High The Fe member. sections which were adopted by (the clerical factions) both be- ered?" defense attorney John
TheHigher,Th ewer, a Outside of t h e conference clericals Thursday night over long to the UAW don't they?" Virga asked.
study released by the Univer- room, Woodcock said the con- the objections of Unity Caucus he added. "It looked weathered, but
sity's Committee on the Status flict between the Unity Caucus supporters, according to Weeks. UAW regional representatives, there were many faces, but the
the f omen, states that beteen and the CDU is "basically an in- NOR DID he indicate whether along with Unity Caucus mem- brightness of the dress attracted
of 1973, the percentage of wom- e od k added that "The he would favor the immediate bers, remained in conference my attention, and in the process
en teachers increased roughly 2 whole thing that needs to be election of permanent officers, with each other until late in the of noticing the dress I thought
a Unity Caucus measure, over evening following Woodcock's her face did appear to be some-'
In both.yearsw n hd as osslet sof s t tsna CDU proposal which would departure. They had no com- what*weathered."
yrldcalrunnings." svote in interim executives in- ment on the outcome of the VIRGA ASKED, "When the
only 5 per cent of the full pro- l itially. meeting, according to Clarence hand came through the people,j
fessorships, Sandler said. Most BOTH FACTIONS within the There had been some specula- Contratto, head of the UAW Re- did you notice the face of the
of the increase was at the low- local have called for elections as tion that Woodcock's interest in gion 1E educational committee. person holding the weapon?"
est levels. The number of wom- soon as possible. the clerical controversy was CDU representatives voiced "I did not," Ford said.
en lecturers nearly doubled to However a debate over wheth- aroused because of an ad-hoc uncertainty over the implica- Virga asked what Ford saw
52 per cent of the total. er permanent or interim officers clerical drive to dissolve-or de- tions of the conference. "We'll of the scene as he was being
should be elected has delayed certify the union as well as a have to see what role the re- hustled away.
SANDLER'S talk on the sta- the vote. CDU-supported dues strike. Both gional representatives play in "I REALLY don't think I
tus of academic women pre- And additional delays have movements have been gaining the business of the local before l looked back in any deliberate
ceeds an International Wom- been caused by the controversy momentum on campus. we can answer that," remarked way," the president said. "I
en s Year Conference today. surrounding the adoption of the However, Woodcock offered no North. was being pushed and moved:

very rapidly by the Secret
Service detail."
Ford spoke in a slow mono-
tone with a serious expression
on his face. He answered many
questions by saying he did not
remember, but there. was no
hesitation before the answers.
During the morning session
Friday, a Sacramento police
detective testified that Fromme
said: "But it didn't go off. I'm
sorry, Sandy," as she was be-
ing led down a corridor at po-
lice headquarters.
Lt. Hal Taylor said the defen-
dant apparently made the com-
ment to her roommote, Sandra
Good, who was in a nearby in-
terrogation room.
Middlesex Street in London,
England, is popularly known as
Petticoat Lane.

DANCING FRIDAY &s SATURDAY With
STRUTTERS' BALL
SMORGASBORD WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY
100 FOODS $4.95
DINNERS FROM $3.95 UP LUNCH $1.50 UP
SUNDAY BUFFET $2.95
0 COCKTAILS WINES 0 BANQUETS
kubaya t Continental Dining
102 S. FIRST 663-2401
OYSTER BAR &
THE SPAGHETTI MACHINE
301 W. HURON 663-2403
SALAD BAR 13 TYPES OF SPAGHETTI
GREEN & WHOLE WHEAT NOODLES OYSTERS, CLAMS,
SHRIMP, SCALLOPS, LOBSTER, RAINBOW TROUT
VEAL, BEEFCTOURNADOES OSOBUCO,
COCKTAILS-WINE
AN UNUSUAL CONCEPT OF P U B L I C DINING
WHERE EVERYTHING HAPPENS IN FRONT OF
YOUR EYES-WITH FRESH INGREDIENTS ONLY.
AT EXTREMELY MODERATE PRICES
The Real
Seafood Co.
OPEN DAILY
341 S. Main St.

ADVERTISEMENT

S
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,or

A Weekly Guide to

Good

Eating . .

CONTINENTAL DINING
The Rubaiyat

The Rubaiyat Continental Dining, 102 South
First Street, has been offering the Ann Arbor
area, for fifteen years, imaginative menus,
great entertainment and food prepared in the
fashion of the "old days," where everything
is "home made," the meats are cut by our
own butchers and the bread is freshly made
from scratch. Yet the prices are still within
the reach of all.
The grand "Smorgasborg" with over one
hundred foods (salads, aspics, appetizers, hot
and cold dishes, desserts, cheeses), offered
every Wednesday and Saturday from 6:00
to 9:00 p.m., except holidays and holiday
eves, for $4.95 is a complete feast, combin-
ing the talents of the chefs who have been
part of the Rubaiyat for over a decade, pre-
paring the food with taste, pride and eye
appeal.
In the regular menu you will find a variety
of foods cooked to order, like Coquilles St.
Jacques, C r a b M e a t Janette, Tournedoes
Forestier, Chateaubriand Bouquetierre, Lamb
Shish Kebab, Veal Cordon Bleu, Steaks, Sea
Food and well seasoned and roasted Prime
Ribs of Beef. Dinner prices start at $3.95
and include Salad Bar or relishes and salad,
fresh bread and butter.
On Thursday nights, our dining room man-
ager "Tamiko," shows her native skills in

preparing Japanese d i s h e s at your table
(Sukiyaki, Okonomiyaki, Tempura, Teriyaki,
Sushi, etc.), changing the menu each week.
Your dinner is accompanied by a fantastic
fresh water cress salad.
On Fridays and Saturdays you can dance
to the sounds of "top forty" bands, selected
for their abiilty to satisfy a wide spectrum,
performing "oldies," blues, light rock and
sven cheek to cheek music and on a large
dance floor where you have room to do your
thing.
On Friday nights you will find "Live Whole
Maine Lobster Special" served with Salad
Bar, baked potato, bread and butter for only
$5.95. Fresh Lobsters are flown directly from
the East Coast the same day.
A luncheon buffet for $2.25 is featured
daily, except Saturday, with several salads,
relishes, hot and cold dishes and coffee.
On Sundays a condensed variation of our
grand "Smorgasborg" is offered from 12:00
noon to 3:00 p.m. for $2.95, with special re-
duced prices for children and Senior Citizens.
Whether it's a quiet "tete a tete," a busi-
ness meeting, a special occasion or just a
lunch or dinner, you will find the Rubaiyat
a congenial, genuine and inexpensive restau-
rant where good food is served without pre-
tense and unnecessary ceremony.

AT THE
() YOU WILL FIND
CGood Food at reason- v
able prices. Lunches or
dinners p 1 u s cocktail C
hour 4-8 p.m.
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
FOR YOUR LISTENING
o AND DANCING PLEASURE {
SPECIAL EVERY
THURSDAY NITE:"
Greek Food,
Music and Dancing
HOURS: M-F 11-2 V.m.;
Sat. & Sun. 5-2 o..
n m eo o-

Highlights from our
fine Greek menu:
GYROS .....$1.45
SHISH-KA-BOB 1.40
MAUSAKA ........1.75
PASTITSIO.......1.75
DOLMADES......... 1.75
SPINACH PIE 1.75.
GYROS PLATE ..... 2.25
COMBINATION
PLATE ..............3.65
HOURSd
Mon.-Sot. 11-12 midnight
Sun. 12-12 midnight
football weekends (Fri.-Sot.)
11 - 3A.M.
226 S. MAIN
994-1012

Tamiko, dining room manager at the Rubaiyat prepares her Teriaki before any dinner
patrons arrive. She makes native Japanese dishes every Thursday night, and serves each
table personally.
The Oyster Bar
and Spaghetti Machine

The pleasures of good food prepared using
only fresh ingredients and served in com-
fortable, pleasant surroundings can't be over-
rated.
At The Oyster Bar and Spaghetti Machine
it's these kinds of dining pleasures you'll
find. The good food includes a full menu of
thirteen types of freshly prepared to order
spaghetti-from the exotic with delectable
seafood sauce to the more familiar with tasty
tomato sauce, a salad bar laden with all sorts
of garnishments for a perfect "just-made"
salad, a grand assortment of fish and sea-
food d i s h e s including those with oysters,
clams, shrimp, scallops, lobster and rainbow
trout. Then there are choices of specially
prepared veal and beef dishes-all like the
spaghetti, freshly made-to add up to a din-
ner selection which can't be topped, and a
versatile and imaginative salad bar.
All this is to be enjoyed at extremely mod-
erate prices in a cozy, intimate and warm
atmosphere where plants abound and oper-
atic arias fill the air.
The Oyster Bar and Spaghetti Machine is
a casual dining spot which opens at five each
evening except Mondays, at 301 West Huron
(corner of Huron and First Street). Its story
is a unique one involving the engineering and
patenting of the spaghetti machine, which

gives the restaurant its name, developed by
owner and chef Greg Fenerli and University
of Michigftn professor John Bardwick III. The
idea was to make pasta, whether plain, green
or whole wheat varieties, well and fresh and
be able to cook this properly without using
the typical "dried noodles out of the package
into hot water" method.
The result of the work with the machine
enables Greg to prepare his own pasta dough,
and while you watch, cut it into proper sizes
in the machine and cook it to the "al dente"
stage without using the usual dried noodles.
The pasta is ready to eat in less than half the
time than "conventionally cooked" spaghetti
is and then is mixed with all types of sauces,
seafood, bacon, vegetables-whatever strikes
your fancy.
With a full complement of wines, beer or
cocktails available to accompany your meal
as well as homemade desserts like chocolate
mousse or cannoli, the Oy s t e r Bar and
Spaghetti Machine offers all you could want
in a restaurant-good food made of the finest
fresh ingredients, pleasant and attentive serv-
ice, warm and casual atmosphere and very
reasonable prices ($2.50 for salad bar only-
$2.75 and up for 'spaghetti-$3.95 for veal
dishes). It can't help but reach the top of
your list of favorite restaurants.

- '- i

Cottage INN
(The oldest pizzeria in Ann Arbor)
SERVING ITALIAN FOOD
OPEN 11 A.M.-1 A.M.

Wine bottles and old kitchen utensils hang from the rafters of the Oyster Bar, downstairs
from the Rubaiyat at the corner of Huron and First. Dinners are served from 5-10 p.m.
daily except Mondays. No reservations are ne cessary.

Heidelberg
215.N. MAIN 0 663-7758
DINING: Complete German a n d American
menu 11 a.m.-' :30 a.m. Salads
DANCING: German Bands on Saturday nights
BANQUET FACILITIES
RATHSKELLER: Folk music sing-along Fri. &
Sat. nights
(NO COVER)

.,
.,y
I" _ .. . .
f

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