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November 12, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-11-12

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Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, November 12, 1975

Protests

Storm sinks
r kn " dnivc

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greet new
(Continued from Page 1)
s ter owned by a Milwaukee in-1
surance company and leased byt
a Cleveland firm, sank in about
520 feet of water while carrying
* a cargo of 26,216 tons of tacon-
AustralZa ite ore pellets.
ONE SHIP reported seeing an
oil slick in the area and others
CANBERRA (Reuter) - An- spotted debris, including two
gryCdemAnB sratio a (stris A capsized lifeboats.
gry demonstrations and strikes At the Fitzgerald's helm, com-
erupted throughout Australia pany officials said, was veter-
yesterday after the unprecedent- an skipper Ernest McSorley of
ed dismissal of Labor Prime Toledo, Ohio. The crew number-
Minister Gough Whitlam by ed 27 plus an apprentice cadet.
the Governor General, John Oglebay-Norton Co. of Cleve-'
Kerr. land, which leased the Fitzger-
Opposition Leader Malcolm ald,. said the vessel was en route
Fraser- named as caretaker from Superior, Wis., to Detroit
prime minister by Kerr worked when it vanished just after 7:10
on plans for a general election, p.m., EDT.
expected ns rDeener e13tas THE LAST Great Lakes disas-
expected on December 13, as ter involving as many men oc-
allabor supporters held protest curred Nov. 18, 1958, when a
rallies in Sydney, Melbourne and U.S. Steel Corp. freighter, the
other major cities. Carl D. Bradley, broke in two
and sank in Lake Michigan with
T H OU SAND bS oifwork- a loss of 33 men.
ers in the shipping and building Officers on board the "Fitz"
industries went on strike. radioed a message to the near-
Bob Hawke, president of both by steamer Arthur M. Ander-
the Labor Party and the pow- son, saying that the Fitzgerald
erful Australian Council of was taking on water and h a d
Trade Unions, called for re- lost two hatch covers.
straint and warned the workers At the time, theiNational
_not to allow their feelings to Weather Service office said,
lead to violence, winds touching 80 miles an hour
lashed the area and kicked up
mountainous waves.
Masschusetts became the sixth CAPT. JESSIE Cooper, skip-
state in the union on Feb. 6, per of the Anderson, w h i c h
1788. was about 10 mles away at the
time, said the Fitzgerald sud-
The magnolia is the state denly disappeared from his ra-
flower of Mississippi. dar screen.

ship in Ford, Senate blast Burns
missing UN vote on Zionism maY back
The sinking apparently hap- NYC aid
pened so fast there was no time (Continued from Page 1) Asked if the President still
to send an SOS. wise" decisions sometimes sought passage of his request (Continued from Page 1)
If this happened a a s t adopted by the world body. for $750 million in economic aid n N m

nrP-

Guard spokesperson said in
Cleveland, it was unlikely many
crewmen could have escaped
from below-deck cabins and
bunks.
The Fitzgerald was built in
1958, named for Edmund Fitz-
gerald, then president of North-
western Mutual, and launched
at River Rouge, Mich. At t h e
time, she was the largest ship
ever launched broadside a n d
cost $8 million.
The "Fitz's" home port of-
ficially was Milwaukee.
if
you

President Ford called the re-
solution a "wholly unjustified
action" but said there were no
plans for the United States to
withdraw from the world forum.
Several members of Congress
began an effort to withdraw
from the United Nations in light
of Monday night's vote.
REP.dLESTER Wolff (D-N.Y.)
said he would introduce a' bill
to cut off funding and all U.S.
participation in the U. N.
General Assembly until Con-
gress is satisfied the United
Nations has returned ,to "its
proper role . . . as a forum for
debate."
"T h e President reaffirmed
that the United States deplores
the characterization of Zioniem
as a form of racism and be-
lieves that adoption of this re-
solution undermines the princi-
ples on which the United Na-
tions is based," White House
spokesman William Greener
said.

for Eg y pt, Greener s a id
"Yes."
H O U S E Republican Lead-,
er John Rhodes told reporters
today, "The United States
should restudy its whole tela-
tionship with the U.N. The ma-
jority of the General Assembly
does not seem to be in tune
with public opinion in the Unit-
ed States or in the western
world for that matter."
Rhodes said he did not favor
a suggestion by Sen. Henry
Jackson, (D-Wash.), among
others, to retaliate through
f o r e i g n aid appropriations
against countries which voted
for the resolution.
The vote was a "new low" for
the world organization,, Jack-;
son said. He promised: "When
we call the roll in the Senate
on the foreign aid program, we
will not forget how, those coun-
tries receiving our aid voted
last night."

ems spreau uuycnpe
dict with great confidence what
will happen, he said.
Burns said he was pleased to
learn of New York Gov. Hugh
Carey's proposal Monday to in-
crease taxes to help the city
and state out of their financial
difficulties. Carey should have
done it sooner, he added.
"Every fair - minded person
believes New York has done a
great deal. I, for one, think
they haven't done enough, but
they have done a great deal,"
Burns said.
IN ANSWER to a question, he
said he still feels that New York
City can solve its problems with-
out federal help.
He also said that New York
City's problems have "served to
dramatize" government finan-
cial problems throughout the
nation.
"Fiscal conservatives have
gained and gained enormously
because of New York's experi-
ence," he said.

E

see
news
happen
call

Large crowd fills Diag for
noon hour anti CIA rally

I

t Pays to Advertise

in The Michigan Daily

(Continued from Page 1)
"This clandestine mentality
is a historical phenomenon - it
didn't develop in a vacuum, it
didn't develop overnight," Tho-
mas added, while a red smoke
flare set of during his speech
floated over the Diag crowd.
JEFF LARK, SGC representa-
tive and member of the Student
Organizing Committee (SOC)
focused on the University's re-
lations with the CIA, criticizing
that alliance and the Univer-
sity's order of priorities.
"I'd say we reorder our prior-
ities to put education at the
top of the list, not research," he
said.
Lark said University officials
with whom he has spoken have
answered his policy questions by

terming. them necessary to
maintain the University's pres-
tige.
"PRESTIGE?" Lark asked,
after heciting a long list of his
own definitions, "That's having
the balls to tell the CIA and
the NSA we don't want you on
our campus".
Diana Autin of the Coalition to
Stop S-1 spoke after Lark and
called the Senate bill "anti-par-
ole, anti-probation and pro-im-
prisonment."
The proposed act, which she
said greatly increases the scope
of law enforcement practices, is
particularly dangerous since
"the CIA and the FBI always
go about ten legal steps beyond
the law."
WINSLOW PECK, a former

employe of the NSA, followed
Autin and elaborated on S-1 say-
ing, "If this law is passed, ev-
eryone here could be put in
jail."
Peck clasified the CIA and
the NSA as "part and parcel of
an organization that is waging
an imperialist war against the
people of the world . . against
you."
Peck said the University has
a long history of co-operation
with the U.S. intelligence com-
munity.
Last on the list of speakers
was Dave Riddle, of the Citi-
zens Committee to End Political
Surveillance, who discussed lo-
cal police surveillance, particu-
larly in Detroit.

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NIEMEYER
COMMITTEE REPORT
The Committee expresses its appreciation to the many persons who have responded to our
appeal for funds to assist Professor Niemeyer durinq this difficult period when, despite her
claim to tenure, she is not receivinq her University salary. Proceedinqs in her law suit are
under way.
We invite all those who have not contributed to do so. Checks should be made out to
Committee for Professor Niemeyer and mailed to Professr Dennis Mitchell, Enqlish Dept.,
7609 Haven Hall. For a full account of the case write Prof. Mitchell or leave word at
telephone number 764-8586.
COMMITTEE FOR PROFESSOR NIEMEYER

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Frank R. Kennedy (Low)

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Ralph A. Loomis (Humanities)
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Thomas McClure (Art)
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Marcel Muller (Rom. Lana.)
Andreis Olte (Elec. and Comp. Enq. )
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