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November 11, 1975 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-11-11

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oege 7'We

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesdey, November 11, 19

pepe w can:

DOCTORS' DECISION

Court saves Quinlan

(Continued from Page 1)
The Judge also noted that
none of the seven physicians
who testified at the trial havei
said there was no hope forr
Karen's recovery from massivea
brain damage suffered last
April 15, but he acknowledged
such hope was remote,
ONE DOCTOR had compared
Karen's chances to the chances
of an object falling up rather
than down.
The Quinlans, devout Roman
Catholics, have been supported
by their local churchmen and
one of their arguments during'
the trial was freedom of re-
ligion
Muir, however, wrote, "re-
ligious beliefs are absolute but
practice in pursuit thereof is
not free from governmental
regulation."
HE RULED that Karen had no
constitutional right to die. In
court Ms. Quinlan had quoted
her daughter as saying she'
would not want her life prolong-
ed by extraordinary means if
there was no hope for her re-
covery.
But Muir said Karen's re-'
marks were theoretical and "she
was not personally involved."
Muir said "Mr. Quinlan em-.
pressed me as a very sincere,
CARL ORFF'S
Carmina Burana
and ,
WILLIAM ALBRIGHT'S
SEVEN DEADLY SINS
8 p.m.-Nov. 14 & 15
2 p.m.-Nov. 16
POWER CENTER for
the Performing Arts
Tickets available at
UAC Ticket Central,
Michigan Union Lobby,
11:30-5:30 daily
INFORMATION 763-2071
Tickets a I s o available at
Powe.r Center Box Office on
days of performances.

moral, ethical and religious per-
son. He is very obviously an-
guished over his decision to ter-
minate what he considers the
lextraordinary care of his
daughter."
HE APPOINTED Quinlan the
guardian of Karen's property,
but made permanent the pre-
vious court appointment of local,
attorney Daniel Coburn as guar-

dian of the young woman's per-
son.
Karen was found unconscious
and struggling for breath last
April 15 after a party at which
police say she took a mixture of
drugs and alcohol. She was
taken to a hospital and fell into a
coma from which she has never
recovered.
After almost seven months in

this condition, her body weight
has dropped from around 120
pounds to about half that and
her condition is - described as
"chronic vegetative state."
The five parties that contested
the Quinlan's suit were the New
Jersey State Attorney-General,
Coburn,, the Morris County
Prosecutor, the hospital and
Karen's physicians.

Kissinger hits Soviet Union
for delay in arms limitation

(Continued from Page 1)
hold still for hegemonial aspira-
tions by any nation."
"Hegemony," or domination,
is a goal often ascribed to the
Soviet Union by Peking.
ALTHOUGH Kissinger c a s t
doubt on the Ford-Brezhnev
summit, originally expected in
June or July, he said Ford's
planned trip to China was on
schedule. Ford is expected to
arrive in Peking on December 1.
Kissinger stressed that the
United States would stand firm
in the negotiations for a new
strategic a r m s agreement,
which would limit the two super

powers to 2,400 strategic bomb-
ers and missiles each.
Although he suggested that
current differences were nego-
tiable, he made it clear that the
United States was taking its
firm stance as a matter of prin-
ciple.
"WE DON'T believe the mere
fact that the Soviet Union has
rejected an American proposal
requires that we come up with
a new one," Kissinger said.
Kissinger conceded that he
and Schlesinger had had differ-
ences over policy but praised
the former defense secretary as
an outstanding analyst of de-

fense matters.
On other issues, Kissinger
said:
-He could justify all covert
intelligence operations that he
was familiar with during his
years in Washington;
--The United States was about
to give Syria arguments in favor
of renewing the United Nations
peace-keeping force in the Go-
lan Heights, whose mandate is
due to expire at the end of this
month;
The manufacture of clothing
and textiles is one of Mississip-
pi's chief industries.

..1 ........ .. .:..'..t.... ". . . 1 .- "'.-.-..- . .. . :. . . M"L..*: ...........::"..S :;:.~-*
DAILY OFFICIAL ULEI
... . ....... .... . ..., . . ..A.'.::::^:4 ::: ':":.:1Vy.....".:V J . t. . .: ::^ ::":iJi t~'1

Tuesday, November 11 Tinsley, Yale, "Statistical Studies of
Day Calendar Stellar and Galactic Evolution,"
WUOM: States of the Union-fea- P&A Colloq. Rm., 4 pm.
tured state, Ohio, 1 am. English: Herbert Scott, poetry
Materials, Metallurgical Eng.: Sy- reading, Pendleton Rm., Union,
las Brayley, Dow Corning Medical 4:10 pm.
Research, "Spare Parts for Your R. C. Lecture Series: Charlie
Body: Use of Silicones in Artificial Bright, "Them and Us: Social Dis-
Organs," 3021 E. Eng., 11 am. tance and Criminal. Images," Greene
CEW: Martha Olmstead, "Devel Lounge, E.Quad, 7 pm.
opment of New Curricula in Public Program in American Culture/
Schools to Improve Understanding MI Railroad Assoc.: Current Pro-
of an Aging Population," 328-330 gress in MI RR Revival, E. Lec. Rm.,
Thompson St., noon. Rackham, 7:30 pm.
Biophysics: S. L. Hsu, "Raman Ctr. S. Southeast Asia Studies:
Spectra of Polypeptides, cont." 205. R. L. Park, "The Emergency in In-
P&A, 3 pm. dia, 1975," Rackham Amph.. 8 pm.
Condensed Matter Seminar: H.. Michigan Women in Science:
Gould, Clark U., "Long-time Dy- Panel, "Money for Grants," E. Conf.
namical Response of a Plasma, 2038 Rm., Rackham. 8 pm.
Randall Lab, 4 pm. Physiology/A-V'Ctr.: Films, diges-
Astronomy Colloquium: Dr. B. tive system, S. Lee. Hall, 8 pm.

If youcan spend some time, even a few hours, with someone who needs
a hand, not a handout, call your local Voluntary AEction Center.
Or write to: "Volunteer" Washington, D.C. 20013 Weneedy
- U The National Center for Voluntary ACtion
«rrblb 1 oao

I

^% $TvFJREY

"The World is Your Classroom"
investigate

To conclude our
I.Golden Anniversary ale
a40
of fine traditional men's clothing and furnishings4
for thefinalfewdays ...
GAMBLERS MARKDOWNS
49~
Tuesday... ...... 30%
Wednesday & Thursday . . 40%
° 4
Friday & Saturday . . . . . 50%
MP 0
We reserve the right to remove merchandise from the sale at anyC
time during this period. The sale will start with our entire inven-
tory.
40
Special Group of Zip-Out LinedRaincoats
Were $55 NOW 138.50
THESE WILL BE REDUCED NO FURTHER,
CA~ill I4

THE MONTEREY INSTITUTE OF FOREIGN STUDIES
ARABIC - ASIAN STUDIES - CHINESE - EDUCATION - ESL - FRENCH - GERMAN
INDONESIAN* - INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS - INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
INTERTIONAL STUDIES - ITALIAN* - JAPANESE -. LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
NEAR EASTERN STUDIES - POLITICAL SCIENCE - PORTUGUESE* -RUSSIAN - SOVIET
STUDIES - SPANISH - TRANSLATION & INTERPRETATION - WEST -EUROPEAN STUDIES
TRAINING FOR SERVICE ABROAD - SUMMER SESSION
* Summer Session only
An independent upper division college and groduate school, 130 miles south of San Francisco,
arantinc the B.A., M.A. degrees; Teachinq Credentials; Certificates in Translation, Interpreta-
tion, Conference Interpretation. Accredited by the Western Association of Schools & Colleqes,
California State Board of Education. Veteran's Approved. For further information, George
Williams, Dean of Admissions, will be visitinq the University of Michigan on Wednesday,
November 12. Appointments may be made by contacting the Career Planninq & Placement
Office.
What Roots has
youcan't patent.

Astronomical Films Festival: This
Land; A Skylab Tour of the U. S.,
Pt. I, Aud. 3, MLB, 8 pm.
Music School: Students Percus-
sion Recital, Recital Hall,, 8 pm.
General Notices
Academic costume may be rented
at the Cellar, Union; orders for De-
cember 14 Commencement should
be placed immediately and must
be placed before November 14.
The State of Michigan is accept-
ing applications for its WINTER
TERM INTERNSHIPS in State Gov-
ernmental agencies and depts.
These are open to undergrad and
grad students on a full or part-
time basis. For more info and appli-
cation forms see the DOB. Appli-
cations due Nov. 28.
Career Planning & Placement
3200 SAB, 764-7456
Recruiting on campus:
Nov. 17 - General Instrument
Nov. 18 - The Institute for Para-
alRadio Shack.; Marathon Oil
Co.
Nov. 19 - Metropolitan Life In-
surance Co; IBM; The Institute
for Paralegal; nversity of Ketuc-
ky Hospital.
INov. 20 - NCR; The RAND Corp.;
Mutual Benefit Insuracee
Nov. 21 - Indian University,
Hospital; Dept. of Health, Educa-
tion, and Welfare; Oak Ridge Na-
tional Laboratires.
Nov. 24 - Indiana University
Law (Bloomington and Indiana-
polis)
dThe White House Is a aept-
eng applications for their 1976-77
White House Fellowship Program.
Applicants must be at least 23, but
not 36 by Sept. 1, 176. Apliaton
deadline is Nov. 28, 1975, InfoWavl-
able in the DOB at CP&P.
VISPA,GPeace Corps,e-and ACTION
rresentatives will be at CP&P all
day Nov. 10 through 13, 1975 Ap-
plications and information are
available at 3200 SAB and the Ce-
dentials Office. Interested persos
can sign up for an interview with
ACTION or drop by.
Recruiting f or 1975 will end Nov.
24, 1975 - There will be no hiter-
views after Thanksgiving or in the
month of December. Recruiting will
begin again In January, 1976.
Summer Placement
320"S", 763-4117
Washington Post, Washington, D.
C. - Deadline for summer job op-
ening Nov. 15, for unior, senors
and graduate students.
NASA, Kennedy Space Center,
Florida - Announces openings for
undergraduates/graduates on asu-
mer programs. Deadline January
and March 15, '76.
NASA, Goddard Space Center,
Maryland - Openings for under-
graduate/graduates in math, cioe-
puter, engineering and clerical.
The Feathered Serpent
IMPORTS £& CRAFTS
FROM THE AMERICAS
309 E. Liberty
I Ann Arbor, Mchian 48103
Telephone (313) 995-4222
~There Isa
:difference!!!
PREPARE FOR:"
~ MCATofver35 years
"A and success "
" U T Small classes
* LSATVouminous home
A GSB "Courses tuateare
i"i® nu Tape facilities for"
" reviews of clas
0* CPofspemtayAT lessons and for use.
O F LX materias "
F ; takeups fr "
M I~u~:missed lessons *
* b~E5I"
i NA'L MD DO

You can patent a sole, as Earth Shoe has.
You can copy it and sell it for less as others have.
But you can't patent comfort, and quality and beautiful which
is what you get in a pair of Roots*
Beautiful top-grain Canadian leather.
Beautiful stitching and workmanship and detail.
A sole that cradles your heel and supports your arch.
And above all, caring.
The people who make and sell Roots really do give a damn

about comfortable and handsome and you. And it shows.
Compare us with Earth Shoes or Nature Shoes or Exersoles or
anybody and you'll get the picture.
You'll pay a bit more for Roots. R
Buy a pair and you'll love them "Be'kindtofeetTheyotnumbopetwotne'
for a long time.

l ""

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