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November 09, 1975 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-11-09

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 9, 1975

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, November 9, 1975

Michigan

blazes

to

victory;

Leach

throws

for

218

yards

(Continued from Page 1) ing target in Jim Smith. I
stead turned Gordon Bell loose "Smith was the secondary
for another one of those dazzl- receiver," explained the fresh-
ing excursions for which he ha's man quarterback, "but I saw
become famous. he was open cutting across the
Seizing Leach's pitchout be- field so I threw it to him."
hind a legion of blockers, Bell ONE COMPLETE pass, 83 re-
skirted right end but, spotting cord - breaking yards and one
an opening in the center, he bone - crushing block later
cut back left. Michigan chalked up its second
High stepping, ducking, spin- touchdown. Smith took the ball
ning and dancing through count- on the Purdue 45 and sprinted
less tackles, the diminutive straight to the endzone while
Heisman Trophy candidate split-end Keith Johnson rudely
squirted into the endzone to cap cut down the final pair of pur-
an unbelievable touchdown run. suers with even a chance at a1
THE CROWD had not stopped tackle.
buzzing three minutes later Stunned but not paralyzed, the
when the Wolverines called in Boilermakers reorganized and
another air strike. began to march on theMichi-
Facing an unappealing third I gan goal line. Their refusal to{
and eight situation at their own ditch their game plan once be-
17, the Michigan coaches called hind began to pay dividends as
for another pass to Bell. Leach, the Purdue running game start-
however, spotted a more tempt- ed to click.
Boilers vaporizedj

MICH.

i

First Downs 23
Rushing (att/yds) 58-283
Passing
(att/comp/int) 9-6-0
Passing yards 218
Punts ,no/avg) 1-48
Fumbles (no/lost) 2-2
Penalties (no/yds) 2-30
SCORING
MICHIGAN 14 0 0
Purdue 0 0
SCORING PLAYS

PURDUE Davis
15 Smith
43-173 Elzinga
15-7-0 Dierking
115 Pruitt
5-38.8 Nagel
2-0 Vitali
2-10

0 14-28

o a

-o

Daily Photo by SCOTT ECCKER
MICHIGAN'S JIM SMITH (37) leaps for a pass in front of Purdue's free safety, Mark Trav-
line (35), in one of five receptions he had yesterday. Smith was the target of 5 Rick Leach
completions as the junior wide receiver accounted for 184 yards catching the ball and another
six on the ground. Leach completed 6 of 9 passes for 218 yards.

MICH-Bell 20 yd run (Wood kick)
MICH-Smith 83 yd pass from Leach
(Wood kick)
MICH-Bell 3 yd run (Wood kick)
MICH-Leach 2 yd run (Wood kick)
RUSHING
MICHIGAN
att yds avg
Bell 20 94 4.7
Lytle 17 80 4.7
Leach 8 68 8.5
Huckleby 5 20 4.0

Leach
Nagel
Vitali
Smith
Bell
Beery
rTownsend
Pruitt
Dierking

3
PURDUE
15 '
22
5
1
PASSING
MICHIGAN
att
9
PURDUE
10
5
RECEIVING
MICHIGAN
no
5
1
PURDUE
3
1
1

16
6
-1
92
73
3
comp
6
5
2
yds
184
34
50
53
6
6

Scott Dierking and Mike
Pruitt pounded out steady yard-
age and frequently threatened
to break long gainers. Quarter-
back Mark Vitali mixed in sev-
eral passes, including a 16 yard-
er on third and eight from the
Blue 43, which kept the Michi-
gan defense guessing.
WITH A first down on the
Michigan 15 Purdue drew a
costly offsides penalty and, four
plays later, relinquished the
ball on downs at the six.
Fueled by another completion
and two long draw plays, the
Wolverines advanced into Pur-
due territory but their attempt
at a third touchdown was foil-
ed at the 21 when Boilermaker
Bob Manella deftly removed the I
football from the grasp of Mich-
igan's Jim Smith.
"I thought I was already
down." offered Smitty but the
referee disagreed. Bo Schem-
bechler had no comment.
AFTER A halftime perform-
ance that brought the band a
standing ovation, both teams
proceeded to grind away the
bulk of the third quarter.
Michigan kept to the ground
on a 69 yard drive that culmi-
nated with a two yard plunge
by Bell into Purdue's endzone
on the first play of the fourth
period.
With the game already safely
in hand Michigan scored a final
touchdown on a drive, the main
play of which was a 38-yard
pass which Smith caught while
barely staying in bounds.
MICHIGAN threw only nine
passes but showed an expertise
that they had previously not
demonstrated. Michigan's offen-
sive line blocked perfectly on
all nine attempts. Center Jim'
Czirr and guards Mark Dono-
hue and Walt Downing were
especially effective in springing
Lytle through the Purdue cen-
ter for several big gains.
Leach did not shrink from any,
opportunities to run and gath-
ered 68 yards on eight tries.
Purdue was troubled by block-
ing failures in the first quarter
and was further hampered by a
quarterback change. Vitali bad-,
ly hurt his toe in the first half
and his replacement, Craig Na-
gel, stifled a promising Purdue
drive in the third quarter when
he fumbled two consecutive
snaps from center.
SCHEMBECHLER was jubi-
lant over the result. "This game
was very important to us." he
said, "We needed a great effort
and I feel we got it. We had a
lot of respect for them and still
do."

riva:aac ar,7

McGUIRE, MEYER LEAD WOLVERINES:

Blue
By TOM DURANCEAU
"We were confident . . .
we just went out and did the
job."
And so it was as the Michigan
cross country team grabbed
their second consecutive Big
Ten cross country champion-
ship at Madison, Wisconsin,
outdistancing h o s t Wisconsin
41-70.
Sophomore sensation ' M i k e
McGuire led the Wolverine con-
tingent with a third-place finish.'
Junior Greg Meyer grabbedI

haiers capture

fourth, Bill Donakowski sixth,
Jack Sinclair, tenth, and Jay
Anstaett 18th.
"THE PRESSURE was on us
to win and we did it," chortled
an elated Michigan coach Ron
W a r h u r s t after the meet.
"Everybody thought that the
Wisconsin home course advant-
age would be important but we
just went out and ran."
Illinois' great runner Craig
Virgin again won the individual
title and set a new Big Ten rec-

ord in the process. It was Vir- with Virgin for awhile, as did:
gin's third consecutive individ- Lindsay, but they both fell backa
ual championship as he toured and finished fifth and secondF
the five mile course in 23:04 to respectively.t
shatter the old record by over. "I WENT by Johnson at the
a minute. Herb Lindsay of Mich- 3% mile mark and then I knewa
igan State was second to Virgin. we had it," stated Michigan'sT
The field went out fairly fast top finisher McGuire.t
with the Michigan team staying The Odana Hills Golf Course,r
together in a pack, as is their where the meet was held, was
custom. Virgin broke to the wet, but farely fast, and the
front at the mile mark and was weather was excellent with a
never headed after that. Wis- temperature of about 60.
consin strong man Mark John- "I thought the race would
son blazed out fast and stayed .
either be real close or that we
would run away with the title,
and as it was we won by 29
* points," commented Warhurst.
OTHER finishers in the top
ten included Steve Lacy of Wis-
nonsin in seventh Rick Maglpey

a
Ro
to
bee
age
jub
tor
ner
wo

title
"I have seen this team take
complete turnabout under
n from a Big Ten also ran
a two time champion, it's
en great," stated senior man-
er Mike D'Agostino in the
bliationof the Wolverine vic-
ry party. Without a senior run-
x on the team, too bad you
n't be here next year Mike.
We're number 1
TEAM

20m20 Hindsight
By JEFF SCHILLER -
Bo's Wolverines .".".
... display the pass
"I'm sure all of our local friends are very happy with
me now. They just love the forward pass."
-Bo Schembechler
HE'S PROBABLY right. Quarterback Rick Leach, wingback
Jim Smith and the newfound Michigan aerial attack are the
talk of the town right at this moment. If you can't understand
why, try to remember the last time Michigan threw for 218
yards.
Bo has been telling us all season that Michigan could throw
the ball. "Leach was recruited as a passer," he would say,
or maybe something like "He (Leach) can really wing the ball."
Somehow nobody believed him until yesterday afternoon.
Leach and company made a believer out of me with their
performance against Purdue. And in doing so, they also
managed to convince me of the validity of one of Schem-
bechler's pet theories-you don't have to throw a lot to be an
effective passing team.
It all depends, I guess, on what you consider the role of the
pass to be in your overall offensive strategy. Schembechler uses
it to keep the defense honest, and also, in certain long yardage
or short time situations. Against Purdue, the strategy worked to
perfection.
For the statistics also reveal that Michigan's ground attack
gained 283 yards. One has to think that the passing game had
something to do with that, particularly if one remembers the
trouble that the Wolverine ground game had in the early going.
Other coaches see the pass as deserving of more emphasis.
It should be noted though, that the most successful of the
current college mentors are not among them..In fact, it's almost
a -truism that the winning percentage of a college football team
varies inversely with its amount of pass attempts.
The main reason can be summed up in one word: CON-
SISTANCY. It's a trait that everyone strives for, but college
passing attacks never seem to achieve.
For a successful pass play to take place, everyone has
to do his job. Otherwise the quarterback gets sacked, throws
the ball away, or watches the receiver drop it. A few great
individual efforts, on the other hand, can make the running
game go. Gordon Bell's breaking of 5 tackles en route to a
20 yard touchdown run yesterday is living proof of that.
Then too, more calamities can befall passing attacks. Few
things can halt offensive momentum more quickly than an
interception, particularly one that is accompanied by a long
runback. Oh, fumbles hurt too, but compare the ratio of
fumbles lost per ground play to interceptions per pass attempt
on almost any team around. The pass is a much riskier play.
Finally, it can be argued that passing-dominated attacks are
not appreciably more effective through the air than are ground
oriented offenses. Sounds strange, I know, but empirically, it
seems to be borne out.
Take the vaunted Stanford passing attack that invaded
Ann Arbor seven weeks ago. They threw the ball 44 times,
completed 24, and passed Michigan silly, remember? When
their net passing yardage is added up though, the figure
comes to only 285 yards on 50 plays (including 6 sacks), only
67 more than Michigan gained in nine plays againstPurdue.
Obviously, this is an extreme case. Or maybe it's not so
obvious. Stanford is one of the best passing teams in the nation
(although admittedly, their yardage figure might be greaten
against a lesser defense than that of the Wolverines), and the
differential might be reduced if one made the comparison with
a less prolific passing team.
Whatever the case, the critics of Michigan's passing game
have been temporarily silenced. And while we're on the subject,
Ohio State was 9 for 13 for 139 yards through the air yesterday.
Might be an aerial circus in Ann Arbor in two weeks. Who
would have ever believed it?

Kansas tops So

MICHIGAN
Wisconsin
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan State
Ohio State
Minnesota
Purdue
Iowa
Northwestern
INDIVIDUAL
1. Craig Virgin, Ill.
2. Herb Lindsay, MSU
3. Mike McGuire, MICH.
4. Greg Meyer, MICH.
5. Mark Johnson, Wis.
6. Bill Donakowski, MICH.
7. Steve Lacy, Wis.
8. Rick Magly, Ind.
9. Jeff Randolph, Wis.
10. Jack Sinclair, MICH.
18. Jay Anstaett, MICH.

41
70
73
78
133
173
184
196
210
264

upsets
By The Associated Press
NORMAN, Okla. - Halfb
Laverne Smith scored twos
ond half touchdowns and
crippled Kansas defense gav
fanatical performance as
unranked Jayhawks brow
fumbling Oklahoma's 28-ga
winning streak to a halt wit
convincing 23-3 Big Eight1
lege football upset yesterday
The Jayhawks, manhandle
the early going, were prope
to the upset when Eddie Le
blocked a Tinker Owens p
with 1:20 left in the first q
ter. That set up quarterb
N o1 a n Cromwell's six-y
touchdown run, giving Kan
a 7-3 lead at the half.
Oklahoma, unbeaten in
games, lost three fumbles a
had three passes intercep
in the second half. The J
hawks converted three oft
turnovers to scores. Sm
scored on runs of 21 and
yards and Bob Swift kicked
21-yord field goal.
Oklahoma had 213 yards V
offense but only three point
show for it in the first half
Tony DiPienzo's 52-yard '1
goal. He later missed on a
yard effort and had a 24-y
attemot blocked by Jayh
cornerback Steve Taylor.

I ford kicked a 37-yard field goal lead early in the first half, bu
ack with five seconds left to play was stymied thereafter.
sec- yesterday and Stanford upset After falling behind 15-14, 1
a ninth-ranked Southern California Nittany Lions made a desp
ve a 13-10 in a Pacific-8 Conference ation attempt at avoiding
the football game. second upset by North Caroli
lght The victory thrust Stanford in- State in as many years. Thl
ame to the Rose Bowl race and all drove from their 20 to the Wo
th a but eliminated Coach John Mc- pack 29 and with 13 secor
col- Kay's Trojans, who lost for the remaining in the game, Ch
. second week in a row. Bahr was short with a 46-ya
d in Langford's dramatic field field goal try.
lled goal ended a tense struggle in *
ewis which the Trojan's Ricky Bell
punt ran for 195 yards on 35 car- rttIiS goof
uarj ries and quarterback Guy Ben- JACKSONVILLE, Fla.-Tig
ack jamin of Stanford hit 15 of 29 end Richard Appleby combin
Yard passes for 161 yards. with wide receiver Gene Wa
nsas Southern Cal, which had gone ington on an unorthodox 80-ya
to the last two Rose Bowls, is touchdown pass with 3:12r
37 now 4-2 in the conference fol- maining yesterday as Georg
and lowing its second consecutive upset 11th-ranked Florida 1
ted unset loss and is 7-2 for the and virtually killed Gator nop
ay- season. Stanford is 6-3-1 overall of a Southeastern Conferen
the but 4-1 in the Pac-8 and could championship.
ith hpe the chance to visit Pasa- The late offensive thunde
18 dena on New Year's Day with bolt caught the Florida d
d a Victories over Oregon and Cali- fense offguard. Appleby took
fornia in its last two games. handoff and found Washingto
otal * * * all alone at the Florida 3
s to pnn St(,e Washington caught the wobb
fon Ph.Saeslips
fiend STATE COLLEGE, Pa.--Saph -pass from Appleby and race
fie omore Jay Sherrill's 24-yard to the game-winning touc
yard field goal early in the fourth down.
awk quarter capped a rally from a Florida reached the Geor
two-touchdown deficit as North 21 in the final minute and h.
Carolina Statedupsetseighth- field goal specialist David Pos
rankedPenn State 15-14 in a attempt a game-tying 28-yard
college football game yesterday. but holder Billy Kynes fumb
ang- Penn State jumped to a 14-0 the snap and the kick w

of Indiana, eighth, and Jeff
Randolph, a Midland, Michigan
native now running for Wiscon-
sin, ninth.
This is Michigan's second
straight Big Ten title under Ron
Warhurst who is only in his
the, second year of coaching here.

23:04.5
23:35.0
23:40.0
23 :48.0
23 :50.0
23:52.0
24:03.0
24:17.0
24:18.0
24:23.0
24 :34.0

Purdue's Agase refused to
compare Michigan and Ohio
State, to whom the Boilermak-
ers lost, 35-6, on October 25.

V..", , ;?, 1 %

t1

Big Ten
Standings

er-
a1
na
hey
olf-
nds
ris
ard
ght
ned
sh-
ard
re-
gia
0-7
pes
nce
er-
Je-
al
ton
30.
ly
;ed
ch-
gia
had
sev
er,
led
ent

State tops Indiana
OHIO STATE 40, ILLINOIS 3; Archie Griffin, Pete John-
son and Tom Skladany turned in record breaking perform-
ances to lead the top-ranked Buckeyes to a 40-3 rout of
Illinois.
Griffin hiked his regular season career total to over
5,000 yards with 127 yards, the 30th time he broke 100 yards.
Johnson battered for two touchdowns, giving him 21 for the
season and a new Big Ten record. Sladany booted two field
goals; one for 59 yards to erase the previous mark of 57
yards set by Illinois' Dan Beaver this year.
Illinois nursed a 3-0 lead into the second quarter, but
Griffin and Skladany teamed up for 10 points before the
half ended. Another field goal and an intercepted pass run
back gave Ohio State breathing room in the third quarter.
Johnson and Jeff Logan capped off the game with three
final quarter touchdowns.
MICHIGAN STATE 14, INDIANA 6; Marshall Lawson's
six-yard touchdown pass to Kirk Gibson in the fourth quar-
ter lifted error-plagued Michigan State to a 14-6 victory
over punchless Indiana.
The Spartans lost four of five fumbles and had two pass-
es intercepted-one of them run back for Indiana's only
touchdown-but the Hoosier offense was bottled the entire
game.
Indiana was held to 105 yards rushing, 81 in the first
half, and 55 passing, all in the final two periods.
* * *
IOWA 45, WISCONSIN 28; Elusive Butch Caldwell scored
one touchdown, passed for another and directed a bruising
and imaginative running game to lift Iowa to a 45-28 upset
over Wisconsin.
Iowa, a seven-point underdog, marched 80, 81 and 71
yards on its first three possessions for a 21-7 lead and
came up with three surprise plays for decisive second half
touchdowns.
Tn ,running itc,;.arnrd to 36 ovrar~llrand1 3-3 in the co-nfer-'

MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Illinois
Wisconsin
Iowa
Purdue
Northwestern
Mich. State
Minnesota
Indiana

Conf.
6 0 0
6 0 0
3 3 0
3 3 0
3 3 0
2 4 0
2 4 0
2 4 0
2 4 0
1 5 0

All
Games
7 0 2
9 0 0
4 5 0
4 5 0
3 6 0
2 7 0
3 6 0
5 4 0
5 4 0
2 7 0

DEBOL SCORES IN OVERTIME

leers

topV

IJSC Stunnedfl
LOS ANGELES-Mike

By PAUL CAMPBELL
Michigan almost fell victim to the Saturday
night jinx, but Dave Debol slammed home a
goal in sudden death overtime to give the Wol-
verines a hard-fought 5-4 victory over the Fight-
ing Sioux of North Dakota.
"I don't know," sighed coach Dan Farrell
after the game. "I can't help but wonder if the
players are thinking about it.'
The "it" Farrell was referring to is the
chronic problem of consistency his teams have
had in two game series over his three years at
Michigan.
THE PATTERN has beenthat they have play-
ed extremely well in the first game (as they did
Friday, winning 11-1) but faltered on Saturday
night.
They came close to faltering last night also,
needing a Doug Lindskog goal with just over
two minutes left in the game to force the ten
minute sudden death session.
The seemingly safe 3-1 lead Michigan took
into the third period disintegrated rapidly, as
an inspired North Dakota team completely
dominated the game for ten minutes, producing

'oeDakota
one weak North Dakota shot. Then Debol broke
down the right side, cut in and shot at goalie
Bill Stankoven. Save. The puck came out to
Debol again. He let go a low shot from the right
side. Save. But Bill Thayer kept the puck in
the zone. He passed to Tom Lindskog, who set
up-you guessed it-Dave Debol. This time
sophomore center made it count on a low drive
from about 15 feet.
The super effort needed by the Wolverines
was an accurate reflection of just how well
North Dakota played. Led by left winger Joe
DeIure, who assisted on all four Fighting Sioux
tallies, they out muscled Michigan for a good
part of the game.
BILLED AS doormats, they played their
hearts out. "They're going to win some games,
and surprise quite a few people," Farrell noted.
The Fighting Sioux scored the game's first goal,
as Tom Goddard stole a pass and beat Robbie
Moore in close. The goal was unusual in that
North Dakota was short oneman when it was
scored.
Less than a minute later, however, Michi-
gan,still holding a one man advantage, scored
as Angie Moretto tipped in a drive off the stick

L

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... ..... ......... . ........ r ........... .,_:

SCORES

COLLEGE FOOTBALL
MICHIGAN 28, Purdue 0
Iowa 45, Wisconsin 28
Michigan State 14, Indiana 6
Minnesota 33, Northwestern 9
Ohio State 40, Illinois 3
Auburn 21, Mississippi state 21
Texas 37, Baylor 21
Princeton 24. Harvard 20
Kansas 23, Oklahoma 3

Miami. Ohio 44, W. Michigan 21
Central Michigan 24, W. Illinois 7
Notre Dame 24, Georgia Tech 3
Maryland 21, Cincinnati 19
Missouri 44, Iowa St. 14
Adrian 13, Kalamazoo 9
Tulsa 70, Drake 7
A rkansas 20, Rice 16
Texas Tech 34, TCU 0
Texas A&M 36, SMU 3
UC~LA 50. Oregonn17I

only a few yards.
Bears bounce
BERKELEY, Calif. - Univer-
sity of California quarterback
Joe Roth, calm even when pass-
ing from his own end zone,
threw four touchdown passes
and accumulated a record 380
,yards yesterday as the Bears
beat Washington 27-24 to remain
in first place in the Pacific-8
Conference.

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