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November 09, 1975 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-11-09

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 9, 1975

I r

TH-MCHGA DIL Snay Nvebe 9 17

-:

Pro s space test succeeds
on Apollo -SQyez mission

sci-fi experts meet

.,_ ,,,

(Continued fromn Page l)
Inked fantasies are sold for as
little as $10.
According to Sid Altus of De-
troit, when bidding on a paint-'

9ictulres to illustrate the Sha-
dow oaperbacks that have be-
come popular again.
"The raperback books have
takeni off." said Steranko. "I

l +v'

(Continued from Page 1)
deter on the American vehicle.
The results allowed scientists
to measure more precisely than
ever before the abundance of
atomic oxygen and nitrogen in
the stratosphere.
Donahue says a crisis de-
veloped when the first attempt
to collect data produced no re-
flected signal. "I was dismay-
ed," Donahue says, speculating
that either the retroreflector
was damaged or Astronaut
Thomas Stafford pointed his in-
struments in the wrong direc-
tion.
NOT WANTING to risk the
success of the second and third
attempts, Donahue says he
quickly asked the Soviets to
somersault their spacecraft 90
degrees so they could fire the
ultraviolet beams off a second
retroreflector intended for an
entirely different purpose. "The
fact that it was there was a
lifesaver," he notes.
The cosmonauts' maneuver-
made the next two "data takes"
a success, Donahue says. The
experiment confirmed earlier

but less reliable measurements set of experiments in their usual
of oxygen taken by mass spec- slow, studied manner.

troscopy and revealed for the'
first time the abundance of
atomic nitrogen in the upper
atmosphere to be about one
atom in every thousand.
Those elements, the professor
explains, are related to the sub-
stances that control the protec-
tive layer of ozone in our at-'
mosphere which scientists have
recently warned is being de-
pleted to dangerously low lev-
els.
THE EXPERIMENT
also proved the feasibility of a
similar project planned for the
Space Shuttle, the United
States' plane-like, reusable ve-
hicle designed to carry out vir-
tually all NASA's space pro-
jects in the 1980s:
In fact, Donahue's experi-
ment was first conceived dur-
ing a summer study by the
National Academy of Sciences
which the space agency com-
missioned to come up with
scientific uses of the shuttle.
"In the middle of that study,"
Donahue says, "NASA ran into
a crisis in developing a payload
(for the Apollo - Soyuz mis-
sion)." Because of the relative-
ly short period of time between
the agreement establishing the
joint space flight and the mis-
sion itself, the agency did not
have enough time to develop a

"THIS SORT of thing seemed
like a natural," Donahue says,
especially since the Apollo-
Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) was
one of the rare instances in
which two spacecraft would fly
together.
But Donahue reveals that
NASA was forced to abandon{
their high standardstfor "relia-
bility and quality analysis
(R and QA)" during the joint
flight, or his $1.5 million ex-
periment would have carried a
pricetag of "at least $50 mil-
lion." Some 20 experiments
flew aboard the U.S. - Soviet
flight, with a total cost on the
American side of about $20
million.
In one cost - cutting decision,
Donahue says, lamps required
for his experiment were built
by two draft dodgers in Canada.
Other equipment was used that
had simply been "lying around
on the shelf."
AND IF NASA's ambitious
shuttle project is to be a suc-
cess, Donahue warns, the agen-
cy must continue to settle for
reduced R. and QA. "Houston
has had an attitude toward
science that is basically anti-
science," Donahue says, ex-
plaining that the Apollo and A-
STP projects were both con-

ing, "you must take into con- think the Shadow is coming off
sideration how much time the the nostA gic trend in the coun-
ceived for political purposes. artist has put into it. Even a trv now, and is being revived
ASTP, Donahue admits, "was factory worker gets five dollars long with Cowboy Bob."
never intended to be scientific. an hour.
This was an exercise in detente "We started a Shadow club,
at the technological level. THE EXHIBITION is domi- 'alledi the Shadow Secret So-
"In my opinion," he adds, ; nated by several imposing plc- ciety," said Steranko. "And
tures of the Shadow, done by th"re are close to 1,000 members
"there were very few good sci- Jim Steranko. Steranko uses the after just six months."
entific experiments" on the ___
joint mission, which climaxed . ~
with a two-day docking. DAILY OFFICIA l BIUILE'TIN
Donahue's troubles, however, .;;.. mo:: . . ;.:: .:. ,:_ ::.n
w 1%+ .LU li i U L to lf Li3 t9o

Tickets available through the PTP Ticket Office,
Mendelssohn Theatre Lobby, Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m. -1
p.m. ,2-5 p.m. Call 764-0450 for information.

werenotnmieu o muuntlois undy, oveber 9 as Mann as Historian, Lee. Rm. 2,
and timing. The professor says Day Calendar MLB, 4:15 pm.
he invited two Soviet Jews to TV Ctr.: Art of Abstraction, wWJ Slavic Languages, Literatures/
join his team, but "they had TV, Channel 4, noon. CREES: Lubomir Dolezel, U. of
a tough time etting out of the WUOM: Marathon 75, 1 pm. Toronto. ;Narrative Worlds," Lee.
a og iegtigot ntry." Rmr. 1. MLB, 8 pm.
,oJt "The Soviets, he add- e Collection, Morris Law- A-v A, Lm Si Gt.
rence, "The Ethnomusicology Ap- A-V Arts Film Series: Giotto and
ed, "were very cooperative i proach to Studying and Teaching thePeRenaissancen8Pendleton
once they understood why we African - American Music," Cady: eR. no,8es
wanted to do what we wanted Rmr., Stearns, 3 pm. General Notices
Music School: Michigan Youth Academic costume may be rented
to do." Symphony, Hill Aud., 4 pm; clart- at the Cellar, Union; orders for De-
net cember 14 Commencement should
The initial meetings with the p;degee rectal, Recita Hall 8 *me omece h
The nital eetngs iththepm;Georges Enesco Memorial Con- be placed immediately and must
Russian scientists, however, cert, Rackham Aud., 8 pm. be placed before November 14.
"tended to go in a very viscous FTP: Irene, Power, 3, 8 pm. The St of Michigan i acce
way," Donahue says, with the Monday, November 10 TERM INTERNSHIPS in State Gov-
Soviets somewhat slow in de- WUOM: "Women in Movies," Pt. ernmental agencies and depts.
cision - making. "It was very -critic Molly Haskell talks about These are open to undergrad and
ciin-mkn.I a ey'women in modern films: II -- Joan ga tdnso ulo at
difficult to make progress," he Miller, author, Women & Theirg rad students on a fu i or par -
said. Sexuality in the New Film, talks cation forms see the DOB. Appli-
with Elaine Prostak, WUHY, 10 am. cations due Nov. 28.
Donahue's role in the space Anthropology: George Stocking. Career Planning & Placement
program is hardly over. He is U.Ciao e adAgeso n 3200 -SAB, 764-7456
tecrm a dy ofscie.ce steer- the Trobriand Islands: Notes from Recruiting on campus:
the chairman of a science steer- Malinowski's Diaries," E. Conf. Rm., November 10, 11. 12, and 13, 1975
ing group and a member of Rackham, 4 pm. -corn,0eace Corps, and VISTA
several teams involved with the omasnFrani s r e will be at CP&P
1978 Pioneer - Venus project Blckburn, Jr., U. Minnesota, Coro -_____
97c wilnd-foeus prunmanned nary Disease Prevention: Profession- E A D)&[.
which will send four al Attitudes and Controversies," volume LXXXVI, No. 58
atmospheric probes around the Francis Aud., SPH, 4 pm. Sunday, November 9, 1975
second planet from the sun. Particle Physics: K. Heller, "Re-.. i edited and managed by students
s dp r h.suits from the Neutral Hyperon Ex-at the University of Michigan. News
periment at Fermilab," 2038 Randall phone 764-0562. Second class postage
Lab, 4 pm. pdld at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
History/Germanic Languages: H. Published d a i 3 y Tuesday through
Joachim Maitre, McGill U., "Thom- Sunday morning during the Univer-
sO-sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
xssroomArbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
----- tehrs $13 by mail outside Ann Ar-

Enjoy Yourself

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The Daily Staff Today.
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TRAINING FOR SERVICE ABROAD - SUMMER SESSION
* Summer Session only
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tion, Conference Interpretation. Accredited by the Western Association of Schools & Colleges,
California State Board of Education. Veteran's Approved. For further information, George
Williams, Dean of Admissions, will be visiting the University of Michigan on Wednesday,
November 12. Appointments may be made by contacting the Career Planning & Placement
Office,

._..__
i

The History Departmen
Department of Germ
the University of Mi
announce a
Thomas Mann Centenni

I i

t and the
non of
chigon
al Lecture

"Thomas Mann

as Historian"

1a

I

World's

Harvest

SUNDAY
Featuring: LIGHTNIN
Special Drink Night: ALL BEER
1/2 PRICE. 9 p.m.-1 1 p.m.

MONDAY
Featuring:
THE MOJO BOOGIE BAND
Special Drink Night: A L L TE-
QUILLA Drinks, 1/2 PRICE. 9 p.m.-
11p.m.
TUESDAY
Featuring: BRAINSTORM
Special Drink Night: ALL BEER
and MIXED DRINKS, 1/2 PRICE.
9 p.m.-11 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Featuring: BRAINSTORM

I

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Announces the Opening of the New
BEER, WINE, and COCKTAILS
are now available
in World's Harvest's Lounge
or with your meal
in the Restaurant
HAPPY HOURS-Mon. thru Sat. 4-6 p.m.
V

by
Prof. H. Joachim Maitre
of McGill University
Modern Languages Building
LECTURE ROOM 2
Monday, Nov. 10-4:15
-'- r) 1-; -
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Air w
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THURSDAY
Featuring: BRAINSTORM
Special Drink Night: ALL BEER
and MIXED DRINKS, 1/2 PRICE.
9 p.m.-1 1 p.m.
FRIDAY &SATURDAY
Featuring: BRAINSTORM
Bring An Old Friend,
Make A New Friend, At:

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