100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 27, 1975 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, October 28, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three .

Tuesday, October 28, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Paqe Three

Judge hears final plea in
Karen Anne Quinlan case

ii I

MORRISTOWN, N. J. (p) -
Karen Anne Quinlan's fate will
be decided in 10 to 14 days, a
judge said yesterday after final
arguments by lawyers who
want to keep the comatose wo-
man alive and by a lawyer for
her parents, who want to "let
her die with dignity."
Citing the complex testimony
at the five-day trial, Superior
Court Judge Robert Muir said
he needed time to prepare a de-
tailed opinion in the case. 1
In his summation, Paul Arm-
strong, the Quinlan's lawyer,
urged Muir to allow death to
come to "a poor and tragic
creature whose life is no more
than a pattern of primitve, in-
voluntary reflexes.

PORZIO ACKNOWLEDGED
that Ms. Quinlan has been giv-
en no chance of survival, but
he said doctors often make
mistakes in their prognoses.
"If Karen Anne Quinlan has
one chance in a thousand, one
chance in 10 thousand, one
chance in a million, who are
we and by what right to we kill
that chance?" he added. "Dare
we defy the divine command,
'Thou shalt not kill?"'
Donald Collester, the Morris
County Prosecutor, argued that
although the Quinlans have
good motives, they are apply-
ing for permission to commit a
crime.
"EUTHANASIA IS homicide,
and homicide is a crime," Col-

their two other children, Mary
Ellen and John, sat impassive-:
ly in the courtroom as the law-
yers expressed sympathy for
them.
"We're very glad the first
part of this is over," said Ms.
Quinlan afterward. "We need
some rest now. Now we'll await
the decision."
Regardless of Muir's ruling,
the case is expected to be ap-
pealed. A source close to the
New Jersey Supreme Court
predicted it would have the
case within six weeks.

TUESDAY NOON-Oct. 28-Ethics & Religion Lounge-3rd floor Union
WHITHER THE PEACE MOVEMENT?
Reflections on the past ten years' struggle to bring a measure of
moral vision to our international policies.
REV. RICHARD FERNANDEZ-Director notional religi-
ous anti-war group (Clergy & Laity Concerned) during
height of our war in Southeast Asia.
LUNCH PROVIDED OR BRING A BROWN BAG
ETHICS & RELIGION-3RD FLOOR UNION-764-7442

"CAN ANYTHING be more I ster said. The Quinlans and
degrading than the concept that """"""""""
death can be cheated if we can
only find the right combination "e " a
of wires, tubes and transist- * difference.
ors?" Armstrong asked.""
Ms. Quinlan, 21, has been in : PREPARE FOR:
a coma for six months. Her par- : MCAT Over 35 years
ents want her removed from " and sccess
a life-sustaining respirator and - 0AT -
doctors have testified that brain Smal classes "
damage has put Ms. Quinlan in : L" SAT U
a "persistant vegetative state" studymaterials
that cannot be reversed by E* RE sy e s
known medical technology. Courses that are "
"In the face of hopeless and " ATGSB constantlyupdated "
irreversible coma, continued " EAT Ta t
treatment serves no valid med- * levsocassons
ical purpose," Armstrong said. PAT lessons and for use e
" rnuof supplementary *
ARRAYED AGAINST Arm- : FLEX
strong were lawyers for Ms. Make-ups for "
Quinlan's doctors, the state; the : ECFMG missed lessons"
Morris County prosecutor,'St. u mi urn nn'
£11....~ TY .A... a i* £ 0

AP Photo
Joseph and Julia Quinlan read letters they received regard-
ing their request to have their daughter, Karen's life termi-
nated. Letters and books have come from Canada, Belgium,
Ireland, England, Germany, Venezuela, Brazil, France, and
the U.S. Over two-thirds of the more than 1,000 letter writers
support the Quinlan's decision.
ATLANTA GA.
In-m1ates freed to
fight overcrowding

Clares Hospital, an. Quin
lan's temporary, court - ap-
pointed guardian, Daniel Co-
burn.
The doctors, lawyer, Ralph
Porzio, asserted that no one
may order someone's death just
because the quality of that life
is low.
"You open the gates to the
deaths of thousands of people
in the United States who may
have a low quality life," Porzio
said. "It gives judicial sanc-
tion to the act of euthanasia,"
he said.

*TIuL MCUEUD
" write or call:
- 1945 Pauline Blvd.
!" (313) 354-0085 "!
" Ann Arbor 48103 "
" 21711 W. Ten Mile Rd. "!
" Southfield, Mi. 48015 !
" r
EDUCATIONAL CENTER
" !
TEST PREPARATION
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938;
L ranches in Major U S Ciue, "

Go home on Allegheny. And
save yourself some money. We
offer a wide variety of discount
travel plans with big savings for
groups and individuals.
The Liberty Fare. You can go
home and a lot of other places
besides, with unlimited travel at
one low price. You get a choice of
3 plans, too-7 days for $129, 14
days for $149 and 21 days for $179.
Good everywhere we fly, except
Canada.r

Group 10. Save up to 331%
roundtrip (up to 20% one way).
Groups of 10 or more save when
they purchase tickets 48 hours in
advance and take off together. And
you can each return separately, if
you like. Good everywhere we fly.
Group 4-9. Save up to 207o
roundtrip. Groups of 4 to 9 save
when you make reservations 48
hours in advance and fly together
to and from selected cities. Stay at
least 3 but no more than 30 days.

Leave before noon on weekdays-
anytime on weekends.
Weekend. Save up to 25% on
your roundtrip ticket when you
go and return on a Saturday or
Sunday.
For complete information on
all of our money-saving discount
travel plans and flight reservations,
see your Travel Agent or call your
local Allegheny Airlines reserva-
tions number. And get ready to go
home or anywhere else.

ATLANTA, Ga. (P) - Dozens
of ex-pprisoners, many express-
ing joy and surprise, streamed+
through Atlanta bus stations1
yesterday as Georgia began a+
mass parole program to relieve+
its overcrowded prisons.
"I'm free and I'm going to
stay out," said Jerry Garrett,z
25, of Rome, a convicted burg-
lar who was released threet
months and 17 days ahead of
schedule.
Garrett was one of 340 priso-t
ners releaseds in the first step
of a program that will grant t
early parole to 1,000 inmates
within the next few weeks and1
to another 1,000 over the next
six months.
STATE PRISONS now house
nearly 11,700 inmates - about'
1,000 more than they were built'
to hold, corrections officials+
say. They call the overcrowdedt
prisons potential powder kegs'.
."I'm glad to get away from3
there," said Deroy Carter, ar
20-year-old Savannah man re-
leased one year early from a'
five-year burglary sentence at
the Georgia Industrial Instifute
in Alto.
Carter, an auto painter before
his arrest, said he ,plans to re-
turn to that work, but other
newly released prisoners await-
ing buses in Atlanta said they
were worried about; finding
jobs.
FLOYD MILLER, 27,
of Rome, Ga., who was releas-
ed five months early from a
parole violation sentence, said,
"I may find a job or I may not.
If I don't, what am I supposed
to do? I still got to live."

The mass - release programs,
instituted by the state's Board
of Pardons and Paroles, cuts up
to one year from the sentences
of about 7,000 inmates convict-
ed of noncapital crimes.
Many of the inmates released
yesterday were eligible for pa-
role, but some sentences were
reduced by as much as an ex-
tra year.

STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
HOME COOKING IS OUR SPECIALTY

CECIL McCALL, chairman of
the Pardons and Paroles Board,
said the board "realizes this ac-
tion is contrary to sound pa-
role practice but the hazards of
taking such action must be
viewed in light of the dangers
if we fail to act."
About 670 persons await
transfer to the prison system
from local jails, which also are
dangerously overcrowded, Mc-
Call said.
Superior Court Judge Harold
Banke of Clayton County, for-
mer president of the Superior
Court Judges Association of
Georgia, said the mass release
"is the best we can do at this
time . .. I've got some of the
worst criminals in the history
of Clayton County in jail and I
can't get them into the prisons."

7

ri

r -

"Once in a while you get shown the light
In the strangest of places if you look at it right"
-Grateful Dead
FREE LECTURE on the
meditation called Knowledge
OCTOBER 28-7:30 p.m.
Michigan League Rooms D and E
"There is.a light shinning outside, but there is a light inside
also that is much, much brighter!"-Guru Maharaj Ji

and monday
and tuesday
and wednesday '
and thursday
WE'RE HAVING A
STEAK PARTY
AT WEST BANK
You celebrate because
it costs only $3.93. It in-
cludes piping hot loaves
of bread, baked or ranch
fried potato, and all the
salad you can eat from
our popular salad bar.
Wear whatever's com-
fortable. It's an informal
party for everyone to
enjoy.
ENTERTAINMENT
and
DANCING
Monday thru Saturday

I

1

i

1 . __

The University of Michigan

Esalen Institute Programs
Questions/Answers
Experiential Session-Gestalt &

I

Thursday, October 30, 1975
8:00 P.M.

1

. ,

Dauroom 1

I

m

I

I

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan