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October 24, 1975 - Image 12

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-10-24

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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, October 24, 19 1:)

Page Twelve THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, October 24, 19k)

............. - ,

TONIGHT
HEADWIND
Appearing at the
I
314 SO. FOURTH ST-.
(Funky jazz)
DANCING
READ and USE
GAILY CLASSIFIEDS

TRIAL CONTINUES
Neurologist terms Quinlan

'grotesque'

MORRISTOWN, New Jersey die by disconnecting the respira-
(Reuter) - A neurologist who tor that is keeping her alive.
examined Karen Anne Quinlan, She is suffering from irrepar-
the 21-year-old woman who has able brain damage.
been in a coma for six nmonths, New Jersey is contesting the
said here yesterday he found her Quinlans' suit. Diamond, a state
"too grotesque to describe in witness, told the court yester-
human terms." + day that when he examined
Dr. Sidney Diamond, professor i Quinlan a week ago he found
of neurology at the Mount Sinai her emaciated and devoid of
School of Medicine in New York I human qualities.

she can survive without the con-
tinued use of the respirator,"
Diamond said. There was no evi-
dence that she had the use of
any mental powers.
DIAMOND WAS preceded on
the witness stand by Dr. Fred
Plum, chief of neurology at New
York Hospital, who said Quin-
lan was in a "chronic vegetative
state," is without cognitive func-

tion and has virtually no hope
of recovery.
But she has the potential to
breathe on her own without the
respirator, he said. Doctors at-
tending Quinlan earlier told the
court they had' tried unsuccess-
fully to "wean" her from the
machine.
The young woman's parents
have the support of local Roman,
Catholic Church authorities in

their suit to allow her to die.
Mrs. Quinlan has testified that
before her daughter suffered
brain damage and fell into a
coma last April she had said
she would rather die than be
kept alive by extraordinary
medical treatment.
Judge Robert Muir, who is
hearing the case and will rule
on it by himself, recessed court
until Monday morning.

was giving evidence on the four-
th day of a state superior court
hearing on whether Quinlan
should be allowed to live.
HER PARENTS, Joseph and
Julia Quinlan, who adopted
Quinlan, want to allow her to

CARL ORFF'S
CARMINA BURANA
and WILLIAM ALBRIGHT'S
SEVEN DEADLY SINS
Choreoaraphed & Danced by
University Dancers
with the
University Chamber Choir
and the
University Symphony Orchestra
8 P.M. NOV. 14 & 15 2 P.M. NOV. 16
POWER CENTER for the Performing Arts
RESERVED TICKETS AT $5, $4 AND $3
Tickets available at: UAC Ticket Central, Michian Union
Lobbyi, 11:30-5:30 daily, Infarmation 763-2071

A TEN DAY SEMINAR
IN ISRAEL
Specially planned for Academicians
Departure date: December 25, 1975
Price: $499-Includes hotels, and
all accommodations
AMERICAN ZIONIST FEDERATION
515 Park Avenue
New York, New York 10022
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
RABBI SHAEL F. SIEGEL
AMERICAN ZIONIST FEDERATION
(212) 371-7750

During the past six months
Quinlan's weight has dropped
from just over 120 pounds to
half that amount. Diamond said
yesterday no doctor would ever
interrupt a device that was per-
forming a life-saving measure.
"IT IS BEYOND the compe-
tence of physicians to deal with
problems relating to life. They
cannot make these decisions
themselves," he said.
But, he said, certain medical
procedures to, prolong the life
of Quinlan would be out of the
question. He gave as examples
massive blood transfusions and
complex surgery.
There is no evidence that
CHARING CROSS
BOOKSHOP
Used, Fine and Scholarly Books
316 S. STATE-994-4041
Open Mon.-Fri. 10-8,
Sat. 10-6

Houston dreads Halloween
poisoning, plans alternatives

HOUSTON, Tex. (AP) - Of-
ficials are promoting the idea
of "punkin' money," coupons
redeemable for candy, as one
way of reducing the risk while
keeping the fun in Halloween
trick-or-treating.
Others are urging youngsters
not to go outside at all on Hal-
loween.
WHAT PARENTS and civic
leaders fear is another poisoning
case like the one last year in
which a father was convicted of
killing his 8-year-old son with
trick-or-treat candy laced with
cyanide.
Memories of that October hor-
ror story linger in the Houston
area where officials are encour-
aging youngsters to go to car-
nivals, parties or just stay home
instead of going door-to-door.'
"There are just too many nuts
out there to risk it any more,"

ml

said one father.
The Houston suburbs of Bell-
aire, Missouri City, El Lago and
La Porte have officially dis-
couraged trick - or - treating. In
Deer P a r k, where O'Bryan
lived, a city carnival for some
2,000 children is planned.
OTHER OFFICIALS, who be-
lieve the trick-or-treat tradition
is too deeply ingrained to stop
altogether, are promoting the
idea of collecting "pumpkin'
money."
Ms. Pate Nufer, a Houston
mother, suggested the idea.
Several Houston chain stores
agreed and are printing sheets
of 5-cent and 2-cent coupons that
can be redeemed at stores for
"anything but cigarettes and
beer," said Nufer.
"I DREAMED up 'punki-
nickels' for 5-cent denominations
and 'punkinduals' for 2-cent
coupons," she said. "I think it
sounds better than telling kids
t h e y' r e trick-or-treating for
paper."~
Homes participating in the
coupon system will post a pic-
ture of "Jolly Jack O'Lantern."
The plan is being promoted
by the Houstonbarea Jaycees
who hope up to 200,000 elemen-
tary children in Harris County
will participate.
NUFER SAID she believes the
program will "keep the fun in

Halloween, but take the fear
out."
Ronald O'Bryan, the 30-year-
old man convicted in the case
that triggered the trick-or-treat
reforms, will spend this Hallo-
ween on Hunstville's death row
where 26 other inmates call him
"the candy man."
A Houston jury last June
found O'Bryan guilty of killing
his son to collect more than
$30,000 in life insurance. Testi-
mony revealed he distributed
five packages of poisoned candy
during a trick-or-treat outing.
He gave one each to his son and
to his daughter.
YOUNG Timothy was the only
child to sample the candy and
an autopsy showed the young-
ster ate enough cyanide to kill
several people.
O'Bryan lives by himself in a
small cell with little to occupy
his time, his attorney said.
O'Bryan has been visited by his
father and mother, but not by
his wife who testified against
him at the trial.
The case is, under appeal and
O'Bryan's attorney said his
client "is still Professing his
innocence" and "still has faith
in the system of justice."
In 1694 fire destroyed more
than half the English city of
Warwick.

wanted something new...something different...
something with a future.
Midshipman William Freeman, from Colorado Springs, Colorado, is one young man who knew
exactly what he wanted. A field with a future. One that offered new'and different challenges-
plus an opportunity for a rewarding career. He found a way to get it, too. Through the Navy's
N ROTC 2-yearOperation Leadership scholarship program. In the Operation Leadership program,
Bill's getting some of the practical leadership and management experience he needs to become
a specialist in the field of nuclear propulsion.
If you're a college sophomore, Operation Leadership can provide the opportunity for you to
qualify yourself for tomorrow's Nuclear Age-today! But it isn't just for anybody. Only a limited
number of students are selected each year for this demanding and highly-competitive program.
Students majoring in engineering and hard sciences such as math, physics and chemistry are
most preferred, although applicants with other majors may be selected provided they have a
strong background in calculus and physics. All applicants must have completed one semester of
" 4 hcollege physics and mathematics through integral calculus, and maintained at least a B minus
average. In your senior year,.assuming that you maintain selection requirements and standards,
you may be given the opportunity to prove to the Director of the Division of Nuclear Reactors and
to his staff that you are qualified and should go on to advanced nuclear power training-and
become a nuclear engineer.
Heavy? You bet it is,. But if you're selected for Operation Leadership, you'll receive a full
scholarship worth $8,000-10,000 for the remainder of your college education which includes
$100 a month for living expenses. But, more important, you'll receive training that can help you
become an officer and a nuclear propulsion specialist in today's Navy. You'll work with a great
team of professionals. Plus travel...see the world...and have some fun. But first calls your Navy
Operation Leadership Recruiter, Lieutenant Walter Fetgatter collect at 313-226-7795, or call toll
free 800-841-8000. (In Georgia, call toll free 800-342-5855.)

Want More Friends.
COME TO THE
Single Graduate Students
AND
Young Professionals Group
AT THE
WESLEY FOUNDATION
STATE AND HURON
THURSDAY NIGHTS AND OTHER TIMES
Call us at 668-6881 for details

_
., ,.
w, ..
-f

The opportunity is for real.

..and so are we. NAY

Welcome Back Alumnus . .
Welcome Back to
"O L LET T'SGEW

322 S. STATE

HOMECOMING WEEKEND HOURS
FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 1975: 9:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
SATURDAY, Oct. 25, 1975: 9:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.

Come in and Look for
your favorite
mug, t-shirt, sweatshirt .
or book!
Lois of specials at aood prices I

! "

~ w

G

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