100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 04, 1975 - Image 52

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1"hursday September 4, 19 1D

Page Four THE MICHIGAN DAILY fhursdoy, September 4, 19D

REGENCY
TRAVEL
Ann Arbor's
Professional Agency
SERVICING:
Students'
and
Faculty's
and
Staff's
and

CONSISTENCY THE

KEY

f
I
t
;i
t
i
}
t
{,
:
,
E
s
l
1
1
7
I
a

Hockey:
By BRIAN DEMING sixth
Success is an athletic tradi- seaso
tion at Michigan that has found every
its way into almost every var- once
sity sport in recent years. Wol- togeti
verine teams succeeded in cop- "W
ping Big Ten championships in comn
Cross-country, football, tennis, super
gymnastics, baseball, and in very
fact Michigan claims ,Big Ten Until
champions in all these sports of th
for 1974-75. anyth
tent
There is one sport however at Ind
Michigan that has failed in re- Indk
cent years to measure up to!aweek
this winning tradition. N o tI tiona]
since 1964 has a Wolverine hock- enou
ey squad finished higher t h a n Char
fourth in the WCHA (Western by M
Collegiate Hockey Association)
standings and as recently as TH
1973 Michigan finished dead last the s
in the conference with a 5-28-1 gan i
record. Before the 1974-75 sea- defea
son, a Michigan hockey squad first
had not had a winning record Wolv
since 1969. seaso
they
BUT THINGS are beginning to in th
look up for Michigan hockey. In
In 1973 the Wolverines got a; al To
new home and a new headmas- mas,
ter. Yost Field House was re- Harv
novated and transformed into of th
Yost Ice Arena while Dan Far- Crim
rell, former assistant coach at in thi
Michigan Tech, became head tourn
coach replacing Al Renfrew. The Stadi
dekers finally put together their ines
first wining season in seven hand]
years this past season struggling of th(
for 20 regular season wins es.
against 16 setbacks. In
The Wolverines showed defin- Tech
ite signs of greatness last year cham
though they finished down in them

The

talent is there

U-M Community

place after the regular
)n. While Michigan b e a t
team it played at least
the Wolverines rarely put
her a string of victories.
e were very inconsistent,"
nented Farrell. "We'd play'
one night and then play
mediocre the next night.
the last four or five weeks
e season we couldn't get
ing together in a consis-
form."
eed, in those last fewi
s Michigan played excep-
lly well - nearly well
gh to qualify for the NCAA
npionships eventually won
ichigan Tech.
E WOLVERINES e n d e d
eason by sweeping Michi-
State 11-8 and 7-5 and then
ted Colorado College in the
round of the playoffs. The
erines, however, saw their
n come to an end when
failed to upset Minnesota
e second round.
the Great Lakes Invitation-
urnament held over Christ-
Michigan's victory over
ard was another highlight
e season. Michigan met the
son .as definite underdogs
e first round of the annual
ament held at Olympia
um in Detroit. The Wolver-
came up with a 3-2 win,
fng the Ivy Leaguers one
eir four regular season loss-
the finals against Michigan
the Wolverines saw t h e
apionship snatched from
as the Huskies exploded

S5

FULL TRAVEL
NEEDS
REGENCY TRAVEL
665-6122
601 E. WILLIAM
(corner William
& Maynard)
(Ask for Joan or Kris!)
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Daily Photo by KEN FINK
Power play!.
Wolverine dekers, Greg Fox (3), Gary Kardos (12), and goalie Robbie Moore, thwart a power
play by the Minnesota Gophers in last season's action at Yost Ice Arena. Michigan opens
the 1975-76 season against the U. S. Olympic Team on October 31, at Yost. This year as
every year, the Wolverines play the finest college teams in the nation, hosting the National
Champion, Michigan Tech, November 21 and 22; the same weekend the football team meets
Ohio State. The nationally ranked Minnesota Gophers will invade Yost on the 23rd and 24th of
January. For the holiday, the Maize and Blue dekers will compete in the Great Lakes Tour-
nament in Detroit. Michigan will skate against the likes of Penn State, Boston University,
and Michigan Tech December 29 through the 31st'.

for three goals in the last 5 15
of play to win, 3-2.
Losing dnly five members of
the '74-75 squad to gradua-ion
- Randy Trudeau, Frank Wern-
er, Gary Kardos, Randy Neal,
and Paul Paris - there is ev-
ery reason to believe the Wol-
verines should surpass last sea-
son's record. As evidenced by
the periodically excellent play,
Michigan has the talent to beat
anybody.
THERE ARE two key reasons
why Farrell especially looks for-
ward to this coming season -
a big reason, and a small rea-
son. The big reason is the re-
turn of 6-4, 210, Angie Moretto.
The senior centerman lead the
team in scoring with 30 goals
and 55 points.
The smaller reason is the
return of senior goaltender Rob-
bie Moore. What Moore lacks in
size (5-5, 155) he makes up in
quickness to make him one of
the most respected netminders
in the Conference.
But if the Wolverines are to
be contenders this season they
must depend on more than
just these two men. One of the
team's biggest weaknesses over
the past two years has been the
lack of support fore Moretti and
Moore. Goal scoring has gener-
ally been sluggish on any 1 i n e
other than Moretto's and de-
fensive lapses have crippled the
Wolverines.
Farrell considers the 75-76
edition of Michigan hockey to
be strong and deep. "We're in
pretty good shape wish depth
at every position."
THE THIRD-YEAR mentor
sees the center position as being
especially strong. Along w i th
Moretto, Michigan's most val-
uable player in 1975, ir senior
I Don Fardig and sophomores
Dave Debol (most colorful rook-
ie) and Kip Maurer (most im-
proved). Fardig was hampered
by injuries last seasan b u t
when healthy performed well
for the Wolverines.
Also returning at either cent-
er or wing positions are Kris

Manery, Pat Hughes and Doug
Lindskog. This trio comprised
the secopd, third and fourth
leading scorers on last years
squad. As juniors they will be
expected -to pick up even more
of the scoring burden.
Size and aggressiveness have
been trademarks of Michigan
hockey in recent years and two
makers of that image have been
Don Dufek and Gary Morrison.
Dufek who doubles as a defen-
sive back on Michigan's foot-
ball team in the fall will join
the dekers around midseason.
LOSING only one defenseman,
Captain Randy Trudeau, Michi-
gan returns an abundance of
defensemen.
Junior Rob Palmer and senior
Greg Fox anchor the defense
while senior Tom Litdskog, jun-
ior Greg Natale, and sophomore
John McCahill also return.
Sophomores Frank Zimmer-
man and Rick Palmer will back
up Moore in goal. While Pal-
mer saw only limited action
Zimmerman was thrust into re-
gular action early last season
after an injury to Moore. The
Edina, Minnesota, naive per-
formed adequately and ended
the season allowing just over
four goals per game.
Already Farrell has recruked
five prospective freshmen, any
or all of whom could move into
regular positions. Bill Wheeler,
from Detroit, played left wing
on Ecorse's National Junior B'
Championship teams At 5310,170,
Wheeler, according to Farrell is
"very, very quick."
FARRELL also says he's
found a fine skater in Michael
Coffman from Richfield, Minne-
sota. Coffman, 6-0, 175, plays
center and right wing.
A left wing and center Mark
Miller from Windsor, Ontario, is
a left-handed shot with speed.
Farrell thinks he's found a
capable left handed center in
Dan Cormier, 6-1, 170, from
Toronto, and a defenseman who
can double as a forward in John
Waymann from St. Lambert,
Quebec.

t 1
SWEAERSFORFALL
See Ann Arbor's largest and most comprehensive selection of
sweaters ever offered on Campus!
The Crew Neck Shetland
A campus favorite. q
Machine wash for easy care.
Shown in over 60 colors
Stocked in both plain
and cable stitch. Also in 21
different combinations of
stripes and patterns.
The Turtleneck
You're out of it if you don't incudet<
this sweater in your wardrobe. ,v
Shown in over 30 colors.
Stocked in both lambswool
and shetland. Plain, cable and .I
rib stitch.,
kh "r;ad utenc
w)r$j TeCen w and Turotesnse
k ;.. ryt ,,} ; n ~Mofayctoliks. s cmor n
9c aK 3Cand( ashmere Sweaweas.rs
SIN L^NGtAND
- - -EE-E-E- - -DE- .
You'e ot of;it ifble modolst inclnde
Shown in ovry30ccolors
StceMn bothV-ecamLaswoooo
an shntlandhmPlinScableran
ribYstitch
' y.- 3 Y-s4--a 5 t'-y¢ -I-LNGAN
d" F~x ^--------------------------- 6
w~fuu9aycsrat ; b: . . " n~ S EE EL SSMO EL

B.MAKER &SALDEALER G ITAR SU I
WORLD FAMOU SU I
H U- N MSICALER
INSTRMENT -IMORIC
MODE R
* A DOMESTIC
. - IStIJEN tS FOREIG
SALES
V -- -ACCESSOIES AL
LESSONS FMUKC
ISUMENTSTae CLASSIC
DPHONE 665-8001 OAMPTSUN
209 S. STATE, ANN ARBOR (UPSTAIRS)

II

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan