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October 15, 1975 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-10-15

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WjtMCriesuuy

THdIHsdIAL

t}ctober 15, 1§75

You've spent years
getting a degree.
Would you spend
three more months
getting a career?

Talk of the tea:
W here's Robben?

'QUALITY OF LIFE'
Prof knocks survey

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bank or corporation doing work previously done
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The starting salary is good. So is the potential for
advancement.
To qualify, you need a good college record and
a Bachelor's Degree. And you'll undergo three
months of intensive training in Philadelphia.
We've placed over 900 graduates in positions in
more than 60 cities throughout the nation.
There's a session starting soon. Mail the coupon.
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S235 South 17th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19103

1

I

(Continued from Page 1)
Nursing student Ann Rondi
didhnot let Fleming's absence
bother her, however.
"I wanted to look at the
house," she said. "It's so well
decorated!"
INDEED, elegance showed in
everything from the plush, tur-
quoise carpeting to the gold-let-
tered cocktail napkins. Students
found themselves wandering
about the dining room, living
room, library and study, mar-
veling at the Fleming's furnish-
ings.
"I like the flowers they have
and their books," commented
Residential College freshwoman
Polly Prelinger.
Most of the cookies were gone
I an hour, and one student
helper said that the cook had to
call a local bakery to order
more.
Eight Markley student volun-
teers, each stationed in a differ-
ent location throughout the
house, were present, masquer-
ading as "security guards" dur-
ing the traditional affair.
"WE WANT to make sure
--I

what's here remains here," said
Ms. Fleming of the precaution-
ary measure.
Vice Presidents Rhodes and
Johnson, sharing two hours of
trivialities with the visiting stu-
dents, enjoyed themselves im-
mensely.
"I had a great time," said
Rhodes. "What a lovely way to
spend two hours."
ONE woman even presented
Johnson with a fresh-pink car-
nation.
"I'm going to take it homet
to my wife," he said.
"We try to entertain the stu-
dents each fall and spring if we
can handle it,"'said Ms. Flem-
ing. "In previous years, there
was no interest in coming to the
house, but students voiced a de-
sire this year."
Also enjoying himself was
LSA freshperson David Schreir.
"It's cheaper than paying for
dinner," he said of the refresh-
ment table.
_ -4

By DAVID GARFINKEL
A recent "quality of life" survey,
which ranked Ann Arbor the tenth best
mid-sized American city, has sparked
a flurry of criticism from a local ob-
server who claims the study was a
sham.
"It's quick and dirty, and it's ridicu-
lous," stormed University Professor
Milan Dluhy when questioned about the
study.
DLUHY,5 assistant professor in the
School of Social Work, chided the re-
searchers for their superficial rankings
of cities, claiming that the study, be-
cause of the national media coverage it
received, put the reputation of all so-
cial sciences in serious jeopardy.
The survey, conducted by Midwest
Research Institute (MRIf) of Kansas
City, Mo., examined the quality of life
in 83 mid-sized cities with emphasis
on economic, environmental, political,
social, educational and health factors.
"People will be suspicious of social
science data," as a result of the study,

Dluhy said yesterday. He termed the
publicity surrounding the release of
the study "a big setback" to the entire.
field of social indicators.
S O C I A L indicators, according to
Dluhy, are a series of statistics that
measure the concept of "well being"
for a society. It was an injustice to the
field to rank cities as the MRI did,
said Dluhy, who called the institute's
method of compiling data for the sur-
vey "sloppy."
According to Dluhy, the MRI demon-
strated a lack of knowledge concerning
which data to use and how to handle it.
Dluhy suggested that a quality of
life survey could theoretically be done
properly, but not with the scant $50,000
in funds which were provided by the
Environmental Protection Agency.
DLUHY, who has been working with
social indicators since their introduc-
tion as a social research tool in 1968,
said he had never before heard of
MRI.
"It's someplace out in the middle of

nowhere whose livelihood depends on
contracts," he said. "They didn't have
the resources to carry it (the study)
out correctly."
Dluhy also slammed the study for its
uselessness, pointing out that the re-
sults were based on 1970 statistics, and
that the study's "one-shot deal" dharac-
teristic reduces its utility to zero.
SOCIAL indicators are only useful
when they are up-to-date and collected
in an ongoing fashion so they can aid
cities with their immediate problems,
he said.
"It's just another waste of federal
money," complained Dluhy.
In response to Dluhy's criticisms,
Mary Kies, assistant in the preparation
of the study for MRI, said the institute
was "pretty satisfied" with the results.
"The ranking of cities was more for
the general public, who wanted to know
how their cities did," said Kies. "We
followed the procedure the EPA want-
ed. We are very proud of the study,
ourselves."

Please
Name..
Address

send me more information.

S

r
,.. City, State, Zip-

I School and Graduating Date_
Grade Point Average Phone__

IF YOUR STYLE
WORKS
WE WON'T FIX IT
UIN1Stylists

An estimated 60,000 persons
died from typhus at Lyon,
France, in 1628.
Dr aulC. Usla

Former Secretary of Labor
criticizes U.S. technoloyv

11

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OPTOMETRIST
Full Contact Lens Service B RI
U ONVisual Examinations By RCK SOBLE served.
UNION 548 CHURCH ST. Technological , advancement "T R A D I T I 0 N A L full
663-2476 does not represent progress in employment policies won't
-_this country, according to Wil- solve the problem", he said. "In
Biard WirA, a former secretary the U of M idiom, 'the best de-
of labor. fense is a good offense."
sCds Addressing a sizeable crowd Wirtz suggests shifting our
at Rackham auditorium last values away from material
night, Wirtz said that because production to individual mat-
Cancelled so many jobs have become ters: "Maximizing the oppor-
automated, "there are between tunity of the individual to make
for t onday, Oct. 20 four to five million Americans the best of the life experience."
who are not doing anything More specifically, he suggest-
Power Center worthwhile for themselves or;ed planning to improve the
atPfor their employers." quality of life by utilizing man-
W E O U G H T to go back power to control pollution, be-
all tickets refundable at HI LLEL along the chain of technological come energy independent, pro-
progress to just this side of out- vide housing, and improve
1429 Hill St. door plumbing," he added. mass transportation.
Wirtz also said that the re-'
placement of workers by ma- "T H E R E A R E infinite-
chines has contributed to the Iy large numbers of things that
STUDENTS d 'thigh unemployment rate. He we can do to improve the qual-
LEAVTh ve estimates that one out of six , ity of life that are economically
Americans may be unemployed : feasible," he said.
toSHEEP...enyears from now. "In the words of the cartoon
"People in this country. are character Pogo, 'our only prob-
YOU Can make a difference asking for the first time, will lem is insurmountable oppor-
there be enough to do?" he ob- tunity," he added.
SGC will be interviewing for the follow-
ing student positions on SACUA com-
m i tees :More wo+men cn(
mittees: OCW m nC
" STATE RELATIONS
* CIVIL LIBERTIES BOARD &6M TO
"ToACADEMIC AFFAIRS (Continued from Page 1) Now, the influx of women is
SRESEARCH PO L C ES And with the increase of wo- forcing a re-evaluation of the
* REEAR H PLIC ESmen training for management,( jobs done, the way things are
(Grad Students) technical and service positions, srun.
changes are becoming apparent "THE FIRST question the
INTERVIEWS for these committees will be held within ROTC's old macho ma- guyswould ask ussat training
TUES. AND WED., OCT. 21 AND 22. Need chinery. thryee years ago was, 'are your a
The Army never really evalu- cadet (ROTC officer) or a wo-
mor information? Stop by SGC Offices, 3rd ated itself, explains Larry Reed, man,''" he said.
floor Union; sign up for an interview and pick a psychology major and ROTC
a tjunior "But Vietnam showed That question has since been
up an application. them they really didn't know answered in the affirmative oni
how to do it all themselves. both counts and Wong, naw aI
- - - - senior ROTC officer, spends
time giving easy instruction to

Wirtz pointed out the inade-
quacy of current national em-
ployment policies. Even if pub-
1 lic employment programs were
expanded to their limits to cov-
er 600,000, over seven million
people would be left unem-
ployed, he said.
REGULAR CASH ayments
to the unemployed, on the other
hand, "represents a form of de-
nfeatism", he said.
Wirtz dealt briefly with the
problem of youth employment,
which is three times greater
than overall unemploymente
"There must be a better ar-
ticulation of the educational and
work processes in this country"
he said. "We must tell young
people what the job prospects
are going to be oberospnext
five years."

"WE COULD develop a profes-
sional career counselling and
guidance service" to replace
inadequate high school counsel-
ing, he proposed.

ishing
?OTC
side by side and it really booted
morale."
But although women have suc-
cessfully penetrated the barriers
to ROTC and military science
101, they have yet to make it to
combat positions on earth, land
or sea.
"LAND COMBAT will take a
while," comments Wong indi-
cating that she has quite a few
reservations about serving such
a function, "and I think most
men do too - infantry is always

Spiritual Leader and Healer on
being sentenced for his presence at
"We Indians have been on suspended sentence for 300
years. We were here long before the wasicum came with
their court houses and jail houses and mad houses. We will
still be here when all these things have long gone."
FRIDAY, OCT. 17-7:30 p.m.
PENDLETON LOUNGE--2nd floor Michigan Union
SLIDES AND DISCUSSION
OFFICE OF ETHICS & RELIGION-764-7442

the new recruits on the iatri- I the last thing they'd choose too."
cacies of an about face turn. As for the current Air Force
"I think we are more easily ban on all female pilots, Wong
accented n o w because, they would like to see it lifted de-
(ROTC recruits) see us in the spite objections that flying, un
upper ranks," explains Wong. der turbulent battle conditions
And Frank Bondy, a nuclear is too ,strenuous on a woman's
physics major, agrees saying, body. "Women are supposed to
"At first a few of us wondered have more endurance," she re-
'women?' but now we really sponds."
enjoy it." Although some men feared the
"THEY (the regular army ad- female ROTC recruits would be
visors) don't go so straight by "hardcore regular army types,"
the books now that women are and others suspected they were
here--it makes for a more re- "Just out- to catch husbands;"
laxed atmosphere. Before it was Wong asserts. "We're really
ouite a macho club," adds pretty normal."
Bondy, "You've got some women who
"IT'S STILL a comnetitive are really gung-ho army and
structure but the women who others who are in it for the ad-
have started getting in are very ministrative and business exper-
responsible people with their ience, of course," she admitted.
own goals too," points out "But the marriage types usually
Bondy. drop out - or get married."
The ROTC program is fully Fifteen of this year's 33 ROTC
integrated right down to a sum- freshpersons are women. The
mer field training session all program first allowed female
must attend. "The army's get- applcantsfi 1973.
ting ready to be flexible," com-

L:

mm

.N

I

I

mlents Bondy. "We participated

ments Bondy. "We participated

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Ford
threatens
vetoes
(Continued from Page 1)
The President said his spend-
ing and tax cut proposals will
lighten the public's tax load and
"help make up for the ravages
of inflation. He said special tax
incentives to business would

R A A!°

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