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October 10, 1975 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-10-10

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rage Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, October I U, 19 l5

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY I~riday, October 11), 190

Another Outstanding Value from...
DISCOUNT BOOK CENTER
on THE MEZZANINE

Don't Let The U
Screw You Again !
SGC is interviewing for ACRICS
(Athletic-Advisory Committee on Recreation
Intramurals Club-Sports)
Interviews will be held
for 2 Student Positions
MONDAY, OCT. 13th
Stop by the 3RD FLOOR OF THE UNION for an
application and more information.

1

i,

Attitudes
cause of
SAT drop
(Continued from Page 1)
increase in the number of col-
leges.
Fricke also said that while
grade point averages in schools
are rising, the quality of educa-
tion has declined.
"GRADES are determined by
many things. They don't neces-
sarily reflect what a student is
learning. While grades have
been going up, quality of educa-
tion, as measured by tests and
other outside indicators, has
been going down," he added.
For the past 12 years entrance
exam scores have followed a
downward trend, causing con-
cern in some circles. Last year
the average SAT score dropped
10 points for a verbal score and
eight for math.
ASSOCIATION OF
JEWIS GRAD STUDENTS
PRESENTS
GRAD FALL
SOCIAL
Sat., Oct. 11
8:30 p.m.
at HILLEL
Music-Dancing-Food
4 50c
1429 HILL 663-3336

r------

The Harvard Lampoon Centennial
Celebration 1876-1973
97 years of the World's Greatest College Humor Mag-
azine are abridged and collected " here, perhaps as a
theoretical proof of non-developmental evolution. Per.-
haps not. Anyway, there are lots of pictures, and it's
several thousand dollars cheaper than buying all the
back issues.

Students say nein, 'non'
to language requirements

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MEET CONGRESSMAN
MORRIS UDALL,
D'emocrat CANDIDATE FOR PRESIDENT
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10th
8:30 P.M.
Conference Rooms 4 and 5
Michigan League
WES VIVIAN, Treasurer
paid political advertising

By LOIS JOSIMOVICH
For years the language requirement has
vied with the natural science distribution for
top honors as the most hated part of the.
University's liberal arts program. Yet, de-
spite the reluctance of many students to ap-
proach beginning, language courses with en-
thusiasm, the teaching assistants. (TA's)
seem to enjoy their jobs.
"I'm not discouraged at all," said one
French . staff member, "I just go into a
classroom and (try to) be myself, and I don't
have many students who don't seem inter-
ested.
ROSA PEREZ, born in Cuba, has taught
Spanish here for the last five years.
"It's never happened that I've had a lot
of people taking Spanish just because they
like it," she admitted frankly, "But I've
never been discouraged by it, it happens in
all courses."
Unfortunately, students aren't nearly as
pleased with the situation as their teaching
assistants.
"I THINK IT (the language requirement)
stinks," said LSA freshperson Mike Mar-
tino. "I don't see why it should be required
of a person trying to get into medicine."
Many students were concerned about ',the
affect an undesired language class could have
on their grade point average.
German student Roswitaj Jordan comment-
ed, "I dislike it very much - if I didn't
.have it my grades would be a lot higher,"
Some TA's sympathize with the students.
In an effort to aid students, Spanish TA
Tom Fine has devised his own system of

grading.
HE explained that students can receive
an A by merely learning the basics, coming
to class, and making a good effort..
He is, however, still in favor of the lan-
guage requirement, remarking, "I am for the
language requirement, but I think it should
be backed up by a strongEnglish grammar
background."
Not all language TA's are in favor of the
requirement, however.
A TA in the German department said, "I
think the language requirement is absurd.
It's unfair to the teachers, as well as to the
students. Why should students be forced to
take classes they don't want or nedd, and
why should we be required to teach. unin-
terested students?"
She declined to give her name, because
as she said, "most of my co-workers disa-
gree with me."
German staff member Philip Sweet doesn't
think that the requirement is the major prob-
lem with beginning language students.
"I think the biggest problem is just an at-
titude toward learning a language, period,"
he said. "I "think it- has something to do w l*
the fact that it's not a purely intellectual
process; It's more like football practice than
chemistry, for example, and a lot of students
don't like that. r
SWEET, a fourth year TA, added that "the
excitement really comes in the second year
when students start to understand things bet-
ter."
"There's really a natural rewards system
in that sense," he.. said.

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If you're a college sophomore, Operation Leadership can provide the opportunity for you to
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HELD OVER WITH LOVE
in 1500 Theatres Nationwide.
It was History's first 3 day standing ovation!..
the country's wild about "Harry"! L

I

Lebanon
I
verges on
collapse
(Continued from Page 1)
KARAMI was to meet with
Lebanese President Suleiman
Franjieh.
j Increasing numbers of guer-
rillas who have bases in Leb-
anon's Palestine refugee camps
for training and raids into IsZ
I rael have been seen taking part
in the Beirut battles.
The two largest and most
,moderate guerrilla units, Ara-
fat's Al Fatah and the Syrian-
backed Saiqa, which together
i can field 12,000 armed troops,
publicly p r o f e s s neutrality.
BUT RADICAL guerri.'11as from
left-wing splinter groups are
fighting with Moslem leftists
against private armies of right-
wing Christian parties. Abcui
800,000 of the 2.5 million Leba-
nese are Christian.
The guerrillas, armed heavily
in recent years by Syria, Iraq,
Libya and other Arab oil states,
provide most of the firepower
for the armed gangs (4 leftists.
I-

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