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October 07, 1975 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-10-07

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Tuesday, October 7, 1975

IMF Ml(CMIUAN DAILY

Page Five

Tuesday, October 7, 1975 IHlzMIU~iI(jAN DAILY Page Five

i

Philharmonic disappointing{
in near-modern ro 9ram
By DAVID BLOMQUIST for strings into a raucous, pom- from the podium detailed phras-0
Arts and Entertainment Editor pous mess. Yet without the ing for instruments carryingz
The ability to evoke a wide proper touch of background, the melodic lines. Sections with con-v
range of tone colors and tex- phrase may seem lifeless and trapuntal parts - especially theh
tures is, of course, the raison stale second violins, lower strings,"
d'etre of the orchestra. For both Such was the nagging fault in and lower winds - were left
composer and conductor, the an otherwise creditable perform- without substantial guidances
challenge lies in selecting just ance Sunday evening in Hill and emphasis from the con-:
how much spice to add from Auditorium by the Hague Phil- ductor.
each instrucent group to create harmonic, marking the begin- It is easy to understand why
an ensemble sound consistent ning of the University Musical Martinon chose to conduct prin-
with the atmosphere of the par- Society's 97th annual Choral cipally toward his lead sections:
ticular composition. Union Series. Conductor Jean after all, a badly phrased pas-
The task is expeedingly tricky, Martinon repeatedly failed to sage in first violins is usually
for when the choice of season- properly balance dynamics be- more noticeable than a similar
ing isn't perfectly adjusted, a tween lead voices and harmo- goof in second bassoon.
performance suddenly assumes nies, resulting in a dull, flatIaf
unintended and totally out-of- sound quality that lacked emo- ins exhibitd fine dexterity dvi
character proportions. Too much tional impact.a yt B
brass accompaniment can con- Martinon's attention seemed a lovely, sweet tone. But the
vert a light, dance-like passage to be concentrated on marking overall string sound seemed
_______________________________________________pale - largely, I think, because
I can count on one hand the
number of times during the
Bridge devotees, evening I heard a clearly enun-
ciated passage from the second
lo and behold these violins or violas.
deadly traps! It's a shame, too, because
I artinon's interpretations else-
By MARK FRIEDLANDER wse seemed letter-perfect He
B)M R F{E LA D I keenly captured in style and
tempo the essence of three wide-
North had still overcalled two spades. ly varied works. The first attraction .
49 4 2 West had already shown up The opening selection, Saint- Jean Martinon, conductor of the Hague Philharmonic, smiles as
r K 10 5 with AQJxx of spades. fe prob- Saen's Symphony in A major, during the orchestra's performance in Hill Auditorium Sunday e
f A 6 3 ably had one of the outstanding presented Martinon with an in- Hague ensemble and the University Choral Un on's Festival Cho
4 10 8 7 4 kings for his overcall but he teresting task: a well-crafted Saens, Stravinsky, and Nielsen as part of the University Music
West East could not have obth. With both example of musical juvenilia, the 1,-6 season.
4 10 6 4 A Q J 8 3 kings he would have had 13 dutifully reflecting the young -
V 9 8 6 3 2 r 7 4 points and opened the bidding (just 15) composer's obvious
f J 10 7 5 2 f K 8 .4 one spade. respect for the orchestra style of Carl Nielsen's Fourth Sym- the most frustrating work on the
4 K 4 6 53 Therefore West had at least the German romantics, especial- phony suffered the most from program, for there were a cou-
South one king. If that king were the ly Beethoven. Martinon kept the unequalized balance between ple of moments - just a couple
4 K 7 5 king of diamonds, the club work at a surprisingly effective sections. Still, I enjoyed Martin- - where Martinon turned his
V A Q J finesse would work, but the con- moderate tempo and volume, on's basic approach to the work, attention to his string section
* Q 9 tract could not be made unless cleanly marking entrances and which distinctly underlined con- and guided a couple of well-
4 A Q J 9 2 the king were singleton. slight changes in meter. trasts between violent, forebod- blocked and richly textured pas-
East South West North Likewise if West's king were The University Choral Union's ing themes in the strings and sages. It was a brief, luscious
2 4 Pass 3 4 Pass 5 4 the king of clubs, the contract Festival Chorus then joined the I more passive motives in the glimpse of what the entire con-
Pass 1 4 Pass 2 4 would be unmakable unless it Philharmonic - minus violins, woodwinds. cert might have been - but just
All pass were singleton. Since East-West violas, and clarinets - for Stra Yet the Nielsen symphony was wasn't.
Opening lead: 10 of spades. had eight diamonds between vinsky's unique Symphony of
When a beginner plays a hand, them and only four clubs, the Psalms, a deeply spiritual work
he plays 26 cards-his and dum- king of clubs was the more that combines traditional as-
my's. When an expert is de- likely singleton. pects of a fugue with unconven-
clarer, he plays as if he sees The expert would know that tional harmonies of the second M ichigan D aily
all 52 cards, just by listening to a singleton king of clubs was and seventh to evoke sensations
the bidding and by making logi- against the odds, but the only of distance and instability.
cal deductions. chance to make the contract Martinon capably emphasized
Sunpose both had reached a rested on finding it that way. Stravinsky's wide range differ-
contract of five clubs on this So reasoning, he would plunk
hand and received the opening down the ace of clubs, bringing ences between high, thickly
lead of the ten of spades. East the king and a look of horror voiced woodwinds and lower
won the ace and returned :he from West who would probably strings, keeping orchestra and
queen, taken by both beginner push his chair back and hold chorus in reasonable balance.
and expert with the king. his hand closer to his chest. Thanks to a shipping mixup in
Here however their paths part. Now the expert is almost
The beginner would count four home. He would pull the rest of New York, the woodwind per-
losers: two spades, one diamond, the trumps and cash three formers were forced to use bor-
and one club. If he could find rounds of hearts before leading rowed instruments, but never- 192 (
the king of clubs, he would a spade to put East on leadin theless flawlessly executedea Fred Zimmermann's 1952
realize, there might be some this situation: complex melodic figure in the
end position developing to dis- North double fugue. And the Hague's EM B
pose of another lser. A- MEMBERn wr ecio eslyO
Not quite emerging from his r- excellent horn section - easily
confusion, the beginner would * A 6 3 the best I've heard in Hill Audi-
lead a heart to dummy and take 4. 10 torium in years - crisply added I
a losing club finesse. West would West East superb backing to a nicely paced
return a diamond and South, A - A 8 final allegro movement. Based on the book and play by Carson McCul-
would end up going down two. 9 9r - lers, this is a tale of two neglected white chit-
After the second round of f J10 7 f K 8 4 The Festival Chorus, however, dren who find an emotional haven in a block
trumps the beginner would dis-} 4 - 4 - had some early problems with maid's kitchen. Wry humor and stabbing pathos
cover that ie had lost to a sin- South pitch and diction. Tenors and mark their first adolescent growing pains.
gleton king and would anologze A - basses sounded a little flat
to his partner saying something V - through the opening prelude
like, "How was I supposed to' * Q 9 movement, while sopranos and WED.: Frank Capra's DRIGIBLE
know?" 4 9 2 altos had difficulty articulating
No self-pity would have been East on lead has to give up y
necessary for the expert. After the rest of the tricks, conceding the Latin text. But both prob- CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD. ARCH. AUD.
counting the same four losers, either a ruff-and-sluff if he re- lems disappeared entirely be- 7:00 & 9:05 Admission $1.25
he would have looked a little turns a spade or leading away fore the allegro.
more deeply into the hand. He from his king of diamonds. - - - - - -
would begin by reviewing the Five clubs, bid and made. It _- -- - .-.
bidding, noticing especially that is easy when you can see all 52
East had passed originally, but cards
Di1d You Know

f that nearly ten million homes in the
United States now subscribe to Cable
TV?
" that Michigan C a b le TV systems
serve almost a quarter million homes?
* that no roof-top antenna, anywhere,
can receive the same consistent pic- -
tuce quality received by cable?
0 roof top antennas, because of wind
and lightning, cause millions of dol-
lors in damage to homes each year?f,
0 your TV set itself will operate more
efficiently on cable? Cable will even
compensate for certain deficiencies
in your set.x
0 the number of channels that can be
carried by cable i salmost unlimited,
while over the air broadcasts have
almost reached their I i m i t. Detroit
has already reached the limit of TV
stations allowed by the Federal gov-
ernment.
* the f utur e of video communica-
tions will be via cable, with additional Guest Artist WILLIAM LEACH (Willy Loman) and PORTER ANDERSON
services such as shopping and bank- (Biff) in Arthur Miller's award-winning production DEATH OF A SALESMAN
ing without ever needing to leave being presented by the Professional Theatre Program at the Power Center

WHY WALK FARTHER!
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Available at
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Daily Photo by KEN FINK
he carefully marks meter
vening. Martinon guided the
rus through works by Saint-
al Society's first offering for
NINA
SIKALOM
JEWS IN SYRIA:
A PEOPLE IN BONDAGE
Tuesday, Oct. 7-8 p.m.
H ILLEL
1429 HILL ST.
663-3336

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING QUICK RESULTS

I

thi wek

1975 UAC Homecoming Photography Contest
REQUIREMENTS: Black & White 8" by 10" (maximum)
THEME: "Students Interacting"
ENTRIES ACCEPTED Oct. 6 thru Oct. 21
ENTRY FEE: $1.00 per photo
ENTRY FORMS Available at:
PURCHASE PHOTO, South University; QUARRY PHOTO, State
Street; UAC OFFICE, 2nd Floor Michigan Union; U. CELLAR, Photo
Desk; ART SCHOOL, North Campus.
For More Information: Richard Sherry-763-1107
UAC Travel
Domestic Travel is promoting trips to New York City on Nov. 25 and 26
before Thanksgiving at a $35 savings. Deadline for signing up is
OCT. 25.
Also flights to New York City, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Dallas
at Christmas Break at comparable savings. Deadline for signing up is
NOV. 20.
Ski and Florida trips for Christmas are in the works . .. final details to
be forthcoming shortly.
MEDIATRICS
"THE CONVERSATION" starring Gene Hackman
OCT. 10 & 11-NATURAL SCIENCE AUDITORIUM
TIME: 7:30 AND 9:30-PRICE: $1.00

UAC Shakespeare Cinema
Laurence Olivier's "HENRY V"
OCT. 13-ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN AUDITORIUM
TIME: 7:00AND 9:30--PRICE: $1.00

UAC Concerts
Tickets for LOGGINS & MESSINA
At UAC Ticket Booth, 1st Floor Michigan Union
Prices: $7.00, $6.00, $5.00, $4.00-Good Seats Still Available
Tickets for BONNIE RAITT, on Sale Today
At UAC Ticket Booth, 1 st Floor Michigan Union
Prices: $5.00, $4.50, $4.00, $3.50-Sorry, we cannot accept personal checks
Minority Affairs
Minority Affairs will be meeting every Monday at 6:00 p.m., at
UAC offices, 2nd floor of the Michigan Union.
UAC Children's Theatre
NEEDS: Choreographer, Prop Head, Costumer, Lighting Designer, Set
Designer, Artist,
any other interested people contact
Linda Cycowski at 763-1107 or 769-6093

Thot Productions
Presents THESE WEEKS ARTS MAGAZINE
Watch for its November debut
Persons with ANY interest call David Oleshansky at 763-1107

I - . mI I

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