100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 01, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 1, 1915

PageEigt IE MCHIGN DILYWedesdy, Otobr 1 1 911

_.. _..

Hear

WEDNESDAY Is
OPERA NIGHT
ON
WUOM 91.7, FM
October 1-7:30 p.m.
Ponchielli: LA GIOCONDA
October 8-8:05 p.m.
Gilbert and Sullivan: THE MIKADO
October 15-8:05 p.m.
Massenet: THERESE
LA NAVARRAISE
October 29-8:05 p.m.
Puccini: LA RONDINE
FOR A FREE PROGRAM GUIDE
CALL (313) 764-9210
Poid for by The Corporation for Public Broadcosting

st uncooperative
SAN FRANCISCO {P) - Law- District Court Judge Oliver Car- proceedings to be
yers for Patricia Hearst reveal- ter, the lawyers said Hearst they said.
ed for the first time yesterday breaks into tears when asked "She would som
that the kidnap victim is not about her experiences with the several minutes sta
cooperating for her defense. Symbionese Liberation Army ahead, ignoring q
Attorneys Terence Hallinan and refuses to discuss her under- were put to her, ev
and John Knutson said Hearst ground life. were repeated sev
is "vacillating in her attitude In the document, labeled "a the lawyers reporte

with

counsel

e taken ;n,"
etimes sit for
aring straight
uestians that
ven when they
veral times,"
ed.

toward her parents and her law-
yers" and is impatient with dis-
cussions of her legal case.
MEANWHILE, a specialist in
legal psychiatry said court-or-
dered mental examinations may
unnerve Hearst since they are
designed to expose her inner-
most feelings. The accused bank
robber underwent four hours of
intensive physical and psychi-
atric testing yesterday.
In another development, attor-
ney F. Lee Bailey, who joined
the Hearst defense team last
week, said the ex-fugitive's trial
would not begin until 1976.
In a statement filed with U.S.

preliminary statement of our
concept of Patty Hearst's mental
and emotional condition," the
attorneys also said they believe
Hearst may be on the verge of
"a nervous breakdown."
HER LAWYERS said in their
statement that during jailhouse
discussions, Hearst "appeared
disorganized, flat and listless in
her account and vacillating in
her attitude toward her parents
and lawyers involved in the
case.
"She seemed to have no idea
of the gravity of her position
and listened with obvious im-
patience to any discussion of the

Dr. Michael Coburn, who spe-
cializes in legal psychiatry, said
the tests Hearst is taking are
"designed to uncover underlying
conflicts, to get beneath the
conscious levels.
"THE PROJECTIVE tests ex-
pose one to his or her own feel-
ings" andacould produce dis-
comfort, said Dr. Coburn.
"Any attempt to force Miss
Hearst into a discussion of the
dark areas in her recent past
brings her to tears and extreme
emotional turmoil," the attor-
neys said in the statement that
was dated Sept. 26, adding their
opinion that to press her further

on these areas "might resLtt in
a permanent and irreversible
psychosis."
". .We are dealing with a
mentally and emotionally dis-
turbed young woman w no is
either emerging from or about
to fall into a nervous creak-
down.
"WE HAD constantly to with-
draw from questioning her be-
cause of, to us, inexplicable ex-
pressions of impatience or re-
sentment .. .
"As. of now, this young wo-
man's mind is too fragile to face
the horrors which she received
during the long period of her
kidnaping."
Hallinan had said earlier that
a "really heavy afternoon" of
testing over the weekend "took
a terrible toll" on Hearst and
made doctors fearful she might
attempt suicide if left in jail.
He asked Judge Carter to let
her be moved to a hospi'al.

Bailey

Hearst

The standard elementary
school textbooks for nearly a
century were written by Prof.
William Holmes McGuffey, his
first and second readers coming
out in 1836.

1600 HEAD FOR S. VIETNAM

Refugees return home

Ford dedicates new
FBI headquarters

Everyone likes to keep snapshots.
We'll snap the ones you can't.

ILIA
.t . r

-rniT E ~J
Mi-i -~Y5~

iI
a,

By AP and Reuter
WASHINGTON - The United
States has decided to allow 1,600
South Vietnamese refugees to
return to their homeland from
Guam following violent demon-
strations in refugee camps on
the island, it was announced
yesterday.
Describing the situation as "a
human dilemma," Julia Taft,
director of the U.S. interagency
task force on Indochinese refu-
gees, said many had fled "in
panic" or under duress and now
wanted to be reunited with their
families.
THE DECISION to allow them
to return was taken by Presi-
dent Ford Monday night, follow-
U

ing a series of petitions and
demonstrations by the refugees,
including a riot August 31 in
which four U.S. martials on
Guam were hospitalized.
U.S. officials said yesterday
that all the refugees had left
their country voluntarily, but
conceded that many of them
were crewmen on ships that had
been ordered out of Vietnamese
waters by fleeing superior of-
ficers.
The voyage from Guam to
South Vietnam, which is expect-
ed to take about two weeks,
will not begin until a ship has
been adequately refitted, fuelled
and supplied for +he journey,
Taft said. She quoted U.S. Navy
officials as saying this would
take two to three weeks.
TAFT acknowledged that de-
spite a recent visit to Hanoi by
the U.S. high commissioner for
refugees, Prince Saoruddin Agha
Khan, there was no assurance
that the rfge will be ac-

cepted.
Taft said letters from relatives
and parents and radio broad-
casts from South Vietnam con-
vinced the refugees they should
make the repatriation attempt.
"We didn't want to be in a
position of denying the self-
determination of these people
who have pleaded for the oppor-
tunity to sail their own ship
home," Taft said.
Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-
Mass.) chairman of the Senate
refugees subcommittee issued a
statement saying the adminis-
tration's "humanitarian intent"
was clear, but he questioned the
wisdom and efficacy of the de-
cision. He asked: "Why have
we opted for the risky course
of simply letting the repatriates
set sail, with no clear under-
standings over their reception?
And what risks do we run by
having U.S. naval vessels escort
the repatriates to Vietnamese
waters?"

WASHINGTON JP-President
Ford got his G-man badge yes-
terday as he dedicated tne new
$126 million FBI headquarters
named for the late J. Edgar
Hoover, who once called the
building a monstrosity.
"Mr. President, we've been
looking you over and you appear
to be good agent material," FBI
Director Clarence Kelley told
Ford during the ceremony in the
sunlit courtyard of the building.
SOME 1,600 dignitaries and in-
vited guests gathered at the
structure officially designated
the J. Edgar Hoover building to
hear the President say the dedi-
cation of FBI men and women
"will be a monument even more
enduring than this imposing
building."
The massive structure on
Pennsylvania Avenue occupies a
full city block about halfway be-
tween the White House and the
Capitol.
Hoover reportedly disliked the
design so intensely that he
hoped the building would not be
named for him.
IN HIS dedication address,
Ford called for "renewed com-
mitment to the rule of law in
America and to the legal system

that perpetuates freedom and
justice."
Ford revealed that he, like
thousands of other youths in the
Hoover era, dreamed of being
an FBI agent. He confided this
ambition after Kelley presentea
him with an FBI agent badge
mounted on a plaque.
T h e dedication cerem(,ny,
complete with the U.S. Marine
Band playing the "J. Edgar
Hoover March," marked the end
of 13 years of planning, con-
struction and cost overruns.
HOOVER ONCE complained
that "the ancient Egyptians
were able to build heir pyra-
mids in far less tine than it is
taking to erect our new build-
ing," a comment Kelley recalled
as he expressed relief that the
work was done.
Many of the FBI's operations
previously were housed in the
J u s t i c e Department building
across Pennsylvania Avenue, but
other offices were in eight
buildings scattered around the
city.
Beginning today, the pubic
gets the chance to appraise the
new structure inside and out.
That's when the popular FBI
tour moves from the Justice De-
partment to the Hoover b'uilding.

MIC IGANENSI .N
U-M's Year in Review
SENIOR PORTRAIT SITTINGS THRU OCT. 10

To make appointment, visit Diag,
phone 764-0561, 6-8 p.m., or,
stop by 420 Maynard

10-3,

WANTED:
Temporary Parents
HOMES FOR
TEENAGERS
1 DAY TO 2 WEEKS
ANY ADULT(S)
CONSIDERED
CALL
OZONE HOUSE
769-6540

I

THIS WEEKEND
FRI.-SAT.
Wade Mainer
Steve Ledford

. a 1.1 £

.

MICHIGAN'S MOST
COMPLETE HI-FI &
ELECTRONICS CENTERS

and the 1q4.I iLu
LEDFORD
STRING BAND

L

$2.50

Ford visits Chicago
under tight security

SALE PRICES GOOD'
DAY, OCTOBER 7

THRU TUES-

Mainer and Ledford, of MAINER'S
MOUNTAINEERS (the leading
stringband of the Southeast during
the 1930's) in a reunion.
Special Gospel Music Workshop Saturday 2 p.m.

I

HALF PRICE SALE!

a

f

s

r

MARANTZ 1030 Integrated
Stereo Amplifier

$899

:3 ' *
0

__ _ i
_,..*;0I., .

e 0 Sorim cooperative
-TONIGHT-
ELLIOT GOULD in ROBERT ALTMAN'S
THE LONG GOODBYE
(1973)
Brazen anti-myth is the theme with Gould out to bumble
Bogart into the around. But Altman softens and courts
the. private-eye genre in beautiful night-beach scenes of
Sterlina Hayden's Heminawayesaue demise and much not
to be missed ACTION-especially catch Mark Rydell's
aanaster role and Henry Gibson's audition for NASHVILLE.
At 7 and 9 p.m.

(Continued from Page 1)
job properly," Ford sa'.d.
"I INTEND to keep my com-
munications open, not i any
foolhardy spirit, but by every
prudent and practical means."
The security was tight from
the time Ford's blue and silver
Boeing 707 jet touched down at
a remote corner of O'Hare air-
port, where only a handful of
officials were on hand to greet
am as he began a two-day visit
to the Midwest.
Chicago police took every rpre-
caution possible after they had
received an anonymous tele-
phone call earlier marking the
President for assassination on
arrival.
Near the rear entrance of the
hotel, about 10 or 15 minutes
before Ford's arrival, police
arrested a woman with a loaded
.2s calibre automatic pistol in
her purse, but Secret Service
agents later determined she
had a permit for the gun and
that she was no threat to Ford.

REGULARLY
$179.95

11

I

, Auk

*WITH PURCHASE OF A PAIR OF SPEAKERS AT REGULAR PRICE FROM
$59.95 PER SPEAKER AND A TURNTABLE, BASE AND CARTRIDGE AT
OUR LOW PACKAGE PRICE FROM $59.95

AMPLIFIER
ALONE-.....129.88

Aud. A, Angell Hall

$1.25

The exciting Morantz 1030 stereo console amplifier has 30 Watts continuous power (RMS)
into 8 ohms from 30-20,000 Hz. with less than .5% total harmonic distortion. Features in-
clude front panel mike input, full automatic protection for output circuitry and associated
speakers, gold-anodized front panel. Wood case optional extra.
-__- = - "MARANTZ 1060 Integrat
_....Stereo A m plifier
97 R EGU LARL
$239.95
AMPLIFIER 'WITH THE PURCHASE OF A PAIR OF SPEAKERS AT REGULART
ONE FROM $99.95 PER SPEAKER AND A TURNTABLE, BASE AND CAR
ALO E... AT OUR LOW PACKAGE PRICE FROM $79.88

THURS.: BLOW-UP and THE WILD CHILD

I

a

- O
OWWWWANNOMOM - -- i --- a wo

ted

FORD SAID in his prepared
remarks that he is giving "pri-
ority" attention" to concluding
a long-term agreement with the
Soviet Union "to assure grain
sales over the next five years at
levels considerably higher than
in the past."
"I am confident we will soon
reach an agreement with the
Russians to facilitate the sale of
this year's bumper crop with
assurances of similar sales in
future years - all while meet-
ing needs at home and keeping
food prices steady," Ford said.
The President also said that
"the recessionary trend has
been reversed" and hailed the
diminished rate of inflation
shown by the August cost of liv-
ing increase of two-tenths of 1
per cent.
"BUT THIS does not mean
the battle against inflation is
won," Ford said, calling for
continued restraint, "particular-
ly on inflationary spending by
the Democratic-controlled Con-
gress.
After the dinner, Ford's
schedule included a reception
for 75 GOP contributors and an
overnight stay at the North
Shore Hilton Hotel in suburban
Skokie.
After meeting there this
morning with a group of small-
town and suburban mayors,
Ford was scheduled to fly to
Omaha for a local television in-
terview and an appearance at
a White House-sponsored do-
mestic policy conference be-
fore returning to Washington.
DESPITE FORD'S vow to
maintain his hectic travel
schedule, yesterday's trip dem-
onstrated clearly the increased
part security considerations are
playing in his plans.
All of the scheduled appear-
ances were before groups whose
members could be screened in
advance. There were no plans
for mingling and hand-shaking
with crowds, and Ford was
scheduled to travel around the
two cities in an armored, en-
closed limousine.
On past Chicago trips, Ford
stayed in downtown hotels.

PUT

t

LY

ON YOUR DOORSTEP!

PRICE
RIDGE

The exciting Marantz 1060 stereo console amplifier is craftsmanship and engineering at
its best. 60 Watts continuous power (RMS) into 8 ohms from 20-20,000 Hz. response with
less than .5% total harmonic disotrtion. Features include 2 front mike inputs, stepped 3-
zone controls, separate preamp and power amp inputs and much more including gold-
anodized front panel. Wood case optional extra.
VISIT OUR ROOM AT
W-103 1975 STEREO & QUAD SHOW

Why wait until the afternoon to find
out what's happening when THE
DAILY can be on your doorstep in
time for breakfast?
Read THE DAILY and keep up on
world, local and campus news, and
sports.
ONLY X12

s
,J7
,,:,;
."

I

OCT. 3rd-Noon-0 p.m.
OCT 4th-Noon-10 p.m.

3rd Floor of the
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
U of M Campus

FOR BOTH SEMESTERS

I -U

. I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan