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September 26, 1975 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-26

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Friday, September 26, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Friday, September 26, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAiLY Page Seven

.............

Lane seeks review Republicans, HRP
of Kennedy murder slam Wheeler veto

By DAVID FENECH
Noted JFK-assassination ex-
pert Mark Lane presented a
case for the reopening of the
investigation of the murder of
former President John F. Ken-
nedy, in a speech Wednesday at
Eastern Michigan University.
Lane, the attorney for Lee
Harvey Oswald, has practiced
law for 25 years, and testified
before the Warren Commission.
HE SPOKE out against doc-
tors and lawyers who he claims
"prostituted their professional
values and ethics" in order to
help the commission bias its
findings.
Lane's conviction that a con-
spiracy was responsible for

a
a
4
t
l
t

President Kennedy's death is
the basis for his desire to see
the investigation reopen. "If
there is a band of people with
guns trying to make our deci-
sions," he said, "we must know
about them in order to stop their
actions.I
"WE HAVE not decided for
ourselves in an election since
1956," Lane continued. "Our
choice in 1960 was gunned down.
Johnson then carried on because
of that assassination. In 1968,
Robert Kennedy could have very
well become President. He too
was shot to death. In 1972, there

(Continued from Page 1)
HENRY mentioned repair of
Ellsworth Road, hiring of more
building inspectors, downtown
improvements, pet control and
legal aid as city services that
Ann Arbor will have to do with-
out, because of the veto.
Councilman Ronald Trow-
bridge (R-Fourth Ward) echoed
Henry's anger, saying, "If the
Emperor (Wheeler) continues to
strut brazenly with no clothes
on, we will not turn our backs.
We will watch and wait to see if
this continues."

3
i
I
'

Illegal use
of U
facilities.
charged
(Continued from Page 1)
any misuse of University prop-
erty."
YET, HE did not dismiss the
rules as inapplicable in this
case. "I think, on their face,
they do apply to the Athletic
Department," remarked Daane.
Other officials were reluctant
yesterday to say that the Uni-
versity guidelines definitely 'ap-
ply to faculty members as well
as student groups.
KENNEDY noted, "My inter-
pretation of the regulation is
that their interest is to aply it#
to student groups who fall un-
der the tax-exempt status of the
University." He pointed out that
certain student groups had used
this tax exemption as a shield
behind which to make consider-
able monetary gains.
Daane concurred: "I think,
when the rules were first drawn
up, the primary emphasis was
directed at the use of facilities
like Hill . , that attracted
large groups with potential for
generating large and inade-
quately controlled revenues."
"I don't see where there'sI
any impropriety," said Land.
"It was done on my vacation
time; the Athletic Department
made a profit because the sta-
dium was lying unused; and T
paid everybody wages."
Dr. Paul C. Uslan
OPTOMETRIST
Full Contact Lens Service
Visual Examinations
548 CHURCH ST.
663.2476

was the assassination attempt KOZACHENKO yesterday pre-
on Wallace's life. These elec- sented Wheeler and the Demo-
tions were decided for us with crats of City Council with a
bullets." four-point "bill of particulars."
Lane is trying to win support The demands include:
for the Citizens' Commission of -Immediate enactment of a
Inquiry in 'order to obtain a re- stiff and effective rent control
investigation via a special con- ordinance;
gressional committee open to -Expansion of the Human
the public as in the televised Rights Ordinance to protect cit-
Watergate hearings. izens from discrimination be-
He reassured students that cause of age, politicalsafsilia-
'"We can control our own des- tion, receipt of public assistance
tinies. We can force Congress to and previous institutional status;
get the facts, but we must work -Immediate expenditure ofI
together. It cannot be done by $1 million in CDRS funds ac-
one man, nor by one committee. c ngnto the original HRP
Since Watergate, Congress has plannand
learned that it must respect and city's disorderly conduct code to
listen to the voice of the people'eliminate victimless offenses
such as drunkenness, prostitu-!
tion, begging, posting of leaflets,
and use of profane language.

But '. Councilwoman Carol
Jones (D-Second Ward) said
that Kozachenko should present
the bill of particulars to coun-
cil herself.
"Kathy has just as much right
to introduce legislation as any-
one else on Council," said Jones.
She has never introduced those
changes. And all of them are
already in the processtofmbeing
put forth. To demand that the
mayor do it is ridiculous.
"In the case of rent control,
she is demanding that the may-L
or legislate what has already'
been defeated by the voters,"
Jones added.
"Little Boy Blue" is the most
famous poem written for chil-
dren by Eugene Field.
WANTED:
Temporary Parents
HOMES FOR
TEENAGERS
1 DAY TO 2 WEEKS
ANY ADULT (S)
CONSIDERED
CALL
OZONE HOUSE
769-6540

TODAY'S STAFF:
News: Gordon Atcheson, Elaine Fletcher, George LobsenzHEY1LITTLE PEOPLE
Cathy Reutter, Jeff Ristine, Jeff Sorensen.
Editorial Page: Michael Beckman, Lee Berry, Howard COME JOIN US AT
Cohn,Cary Gold, Paul Haskins, Debra Hurwitz, Tom Corntree Day Care Co-op
Arts Page: David Weinbergv2s-6 YRS. OLD
Photo Technician: Gordon Tucker We have only 6 more places open this' fall. Your mom
and dad's have to do one 4112 hr. shift per week. $ (70/per
mo.) How come? Because they say they're committed to
a non-sexist and non-racist community.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETI.JN COME AND HELP US MAKE IT HAPPEN
YAL 662-2993-LINDA 665-0606-SARA 769-0798
Friday, September 26 Health Issues in Africa," Hender-
son Rm., League, 2:30 pm; Sahara -.IN
Day Calendar la caravane du Sel, Leo. Rm. 1,
WUJOM: Symposium,. "Biology,. MLB, 8 pm: African music, danoe,(
Ethics. & Law: Can They Help Each Res. Coll. Aud., E. Quad, 9npm. )
Other?" 9:55 am. PTP: "Words and Music," Power,
Educ.. Communications. Media: 8 -Pm. m
The Glass House, Schorling Aud., Music School: Degree recital -Se
SEB, noon. Jim Brown, double bass, Recital Sundaycofernoon conversations about
Africa Week: A. Nyongo, "Public Hall, 8 pm.
the relationship between people's spir-
OCTOBER 27 i tual and sexual journeys.
Persons interested in submitting proposals SUNDAYS at 3:0 p.m.
for consideration as Winter 1976 Course beginning September 28, 1975
Mort offerings should come to 2501 LSA
Bldg. (763-3404) soon to obtain application at
forms and an explanation
COURSE MART 01Z TICBU
WINTER '76
of Course Mart procedures and guidelines .o /
from Linda Rogers or Joan Woodward. All
proposals must be completed and returned to
2501 LSA Bldg. by October 27, 1975 to be + A e tfo undtion
considered for Winter Term '76 offering.-28 r v o
Thank you. at'or, an 1,108 tdcphrone 6165-0606
OCTOBER 27

T r T

a

ffj

"OF COURSE, there will have
to be some negotiation of the
CDRS funds," said Kozachenko.
"But we're negotiating, not kow-
towing."

FALAFIL PALACE
FINE MIDDLE EASTERN FOOD
SPECIALS
FALAFIL-69c
BAKLAVA-29c
ALL BAGELS-8c
CIGARETTES-all sizes, all kinds
Cartons $3.99-Individual Packs 45c + tax
629 EAST UNIVERSITY 994-4962

wanted something new..something different...
something with a future.
Midshipman William Freeman, from Colorado Springs, Colorado, is one young man who knew
exactly what he wanted. A field with a future. One that offered new and different challenges-
plus an opportunity for a rewarding career. He found a way to get it, too. Through the Navy's
NROTC2-yearOperation Leadership scholarship program. In the Operation Leadership program,
Bill's getting some of the practical leadership and management experience he needs to becdme
a specialist in the field of nuclear propulsion.
If you're a college sophomore, Operation Leadership can provide the opportunity for you to
qualify yourself for tomorrow's Nuclear Age-today! But it isn't just for anybody. Only a limited
number of students are selected each year for this demanding and highly-competitive program.
Students majoring in engineering and hard sciences such as math, physics and chemistry are.
most preferred, although applicants with other majors may be selected provided they have a
r strong background in calculus and physics. All applicants must have completed one semester of
college physics and mathematics through integral calculus, and maintained at least a B minus
average. In your senior year, assuming that you maintain selection requirements and standards,
you may be given the opportunity to prove to the Director of the Division of Nuclear Reactors and
to his staff that you are qualified and should go on to advanced nuclear power training-and
become a nuclear engineer.
Heavy? You bet it is. But if you're selected for Operation Leadership, you'll receive a full
scholarship worth $8,000-10,000 for the remainder of your college education which includes
$100 a month for living expenses. But, more important, you'll receive training that can help you
become an officer and a nuclear propulsion specialist in today's Navy. You'll work with a great
team of professionals. Plus travel...see the world...and have some fun. But first call your Navy
Operation Leadership Recruiter, Lieutenant Walter Fetgatter collect at 313-226-7795, or call toll
free 800-841-8000. (In Georgia, call toll free 800-342-5855.)
opportunity is for real... and so are we.INAXY

The Medieval and Renaissance Colleqium announces a
one-credit hour mini course to be held in coniunction with
the Fall, 1975, Boccaccio Festival. Requirements for the
course are to attend 1) the Festival lectures (September
22 & 23; November 6. 7. & 8; and November 20 & 21,
2) four Festival films (October 24, 25. 26, and December
5 & 6), 3) the performances of "La Mandraola" and
"Carmina Burana," and 4) a show of late Medieval and
Renaissance art in the University Art Museum (November
21 through January 4). In additaon, each student will be
required to write a short {5-7 paqes) paper. Further in-
formation recardinc times and titles of performances, lec-
tures, and films may be obtained through the MARC of-
fice, N-Entrywav, N-12, Law Quad (tel+ 763-2066),
Students may register for the course in the MARC office.
Registration must be completed by September 30, 1975.
Course co-ordinator: Jeanne S. Martin, Associate Director,
MARC. Office hours: MW 10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon.

UNUSUAL IMP
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