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September 25, 1975 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, September 25, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Mayor vetoes CDRS
plan; Republicans may
launch recall campaign

i
I
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PoocSev_.

CIA opened mail
of govt. officials

Moore led dual life:

i

(Continued from Page1)

(Continued from Page 1)
week should he enact his veto,
said following the Mayor's ac-
tion yesterday, they will launch
a petiton drive against Ann Ar-
bor's unique preferential voting
(PV) system next week adding
that a successful drive may
compel them to initiate a recall
campaign.
Under the city's first PV elec-
tion last April, voters were giv-
en three choices for Mayor. No
candidate received a clear ma-
jority, so the second choices of
the candidate who finished third
were re-distributed among the
other two candidates. It was this
tally system that is credited
with elevating Wheeler into of-
fice over Republcan incumbent
James Stephenson.
ACCORDING to Councilman
Roger Bertoia (R-Third Ward),
starting a recall campaign be-
fore attempting to repeal PV,
would be "premature".
"Pragmatically, it doesn't pay
to go ahead with a recall right
now because it would take too
much effort (out of a PV
drive)," said Bertoia.
However, if the Republicans
garner the 4,000 signatures nec-
essary to put the issue back on
the ballot this April, Bertoia
said the GOP may then carry
through on its recall threat.
COUNCILMAN Ronald Trow-
bridge (R-Fourth Ward) admit-
ted yesterday that he doubted
the Republicans could get the
10,000 signatures necessary for a
recall petition, over the isolat-
ed veto action.
"But I'm working a list (of
grievances a g a i n s t Wheeler)
right now to justify a recall at
some point," he added.
Wheeler, however, has called
the recall threats "ridiculous,"
saying they bother him "about
as much as a fly on my coat."
IN outlining his veto which

he said he regretted, but felt
was necessary, Wheeler cited
ten reasons for his action. The
foremost reason was a reitera-
tion of Wheeler's long-held po-
siton that the vetoed resoluton
"approves a series of projects
and not a coordinated and in-
tegrated program, the primary
objective of which is the devel-
opment of viable neighborhoods
by providing decent housing and
a suitable living environment
and expanding economic oppor-
tunities, principally for persons
of low and moderate income."
Wheeler also offered a "four-
phased schedule" for develop-
ing a revised CDRS program,
the first phase being yesterday's
allocation of emergency funding
to existing community pro
grams.
By October 20 Wheeler hopes
to have completed phase two of
his program, which calls for
council review of all proposals
previously submitted to the
CDRS Advisory Committee,
"with the objective of giving
final or tentative approval to
agencies and activities which
meet essential conditions."
PHASE three involves selec-
tion of a new CDRS comhttee,
and the development of an
amended CDRS proposal by Oc-
tober 31.
The final phase would be the
development and submission to
HUD of a plan for second year
federal funds available next
summer.
Accompanying the veto was
the mayor'stentative plan for
the development of a human
services agency by Jan. 1. The
agency, he said, would act as
an "umbrella" for employment,:
community service, human
rights, recreation, neighborhood
development and informal com-
munity service components.
VERSITY COURSE 414
ETERMINISM:
APPRAISAL"

his tenure as President - and
that mail of other Presidents
had been scrutinized as well.
The aide later withdrew that
statement, saying he had mis-
understood committeehinvesti-
gators, and Church himself con-
firmed the narrower version.
CHURCH said that all the let-
ters intercepted by the CIA were
either sent from Communist
Bloc countries or mailed from
the United States to persons in
those nations.
And Church said that one of
his own letters, written to his
mother-in-law while he was in
the Soviet Union, was included
in correspondence found by his
committee's staff while probing
the CIA mail-opening operation
-a project which was begun in
1952 and not closed down until
Feb. 15, 1973.
Church's first statement on
the matterdyesterday morning
offered no detail but implied a
wider scope to the mail surveil-
lance than he later outlined.
IN PART, he said, "We want
to know why the CIA opened the
mail of organizations such as
the Ford Foundation, Harvard
University, and the Rockefeller
Foundation or why mail to and
from persons such as Federal
Reserve Chairman A r t h u r
Burns, Rep. Bella Abzug, (D-
N.Y.), Jay Rockefeller, Martin
Luther King Jr., Richard Nixon
himself, Hubert Humphrey and
Edward Kennedy . . . should
have been regularly opened and
scrutinized by the CIA."
Sen. Walter Mondale (D-

Minn.), also said among those
on the CIA "watch list" were
double Nobel prize winner Linus
Pauling, author John Steinbeck
and labor leader Victor Reuther.
CHURCH told of the CIA's
mail opening operation as his
committee questioned James An-
gleton, former CIA counter-
intelligence chief and National
Security Council member Rich-
ard Ober, who once worked for
Angleton.
Angleton insisted, the overall
operation had been valuable. He
cited leads it provided in the
still unsuccessful pursuit of
Kathy Boudin, a woman alleged-
ly seen running from an explo-
sion which destroyed the Green-
wich Village bomb factory of
the Weathermen, a radical left-
ist group, on March 6, 1970.
"When we went back through
the mail program letters we
found she had written from Mos-
cow 30 to 40 letters to people
in the United States," Angleton
said. "These were the only leads
the -FBI had. She's still a fugi-
tive. It raises in anyone's mind
the question of whether she's in
Moscow."
But Church said the pro-
gram's value must be balanced
against the harm it did to the
constitutional rights of Ameri-
can citizens.
"In the future, intelligence
organizations had better honor
the Constitution and the laws
because that's what freedom is
all about," Church said.

Radical and informer
(Continued from Page 1) attempt."And as a result, there
tests on whether she is sane is an open investigation based on
enough to stand trial on a what she said.
charge of attempting to assassi- "It just so happened that the
nate the President. shooting occurred at this time,";
the source said.
MOORE will spend about two;I
months in a light, cheerful room: MOORE, an informant for the
at San Diego Metropolitan Cor- FBI, local police and the fed-
rectional Center, opened Dec. 2 eral Bureau of Alcohol, Tobac-
by the U.S. Bureau of Prisons. co and Firearms (ATF) gave
It is one of the three federal' her most recent information on
facilities in the nation designed federal gun control violations,
specifically for psychiatric work- the source said.
ups on prisoners before trial or W. H. McConnell, assistant
sentencing. to the director of the ATF, said
The warden at the facility in Washington:
said yesterday there are no spe- "Contact with Mrs. Moore is
cial plans to house Moore, or to . ith
beef up security. vestigation and we decline to
Warden J. D. Williams said, discuss anything."
"She'll be treated like all the
others." The 45-year-old Moore, a di-
vorcee with a 9-year-old son,
THERE are no bars in the had lived on the fringe of the
22- story downtown building, Bay Area radical world while
which cost $13 million. The resi- slipping information to the FBI,
dents are given private rooms ATF and San Francisco Police.
with piped-in music, a dressing
table, a reading lamp and a THE FBI said it ended its con-
,private toilet. tact with Moore in June after
"She gave federal firearms she publicly admitted her year-
agents a bit of information with- long efforts a stheir informant.
in the last two or three days," In the 48 hours before the shot
said one law enforcement source was fired at Ford, Moore hinted
the day after the assassination to police what was on her mind.
Because of the effects of the new CRISP reqistration sys-
tem, the PIRGIM fee is now collected in the manner ori-
cinally petitioned for by 1 6,000 UM students. You have
been assessed a $1 .50 fee for PIRGIM on your tuition bill.
For those students who do not wish to support the group,
PIRGIM announces:
PIRGIM FEE
I REFUND

GIRLS! GUYS!
WHAT WOULD YOUR MOTHER SAY
IF YOU JOINED A FRATERNITY
FIND OUT
Join THETA XI
THE COED FRATERNITY
RUSH - SEPTEMBER 21-25 - 7-10 p.m.
OR CALL 1345 WASHTENAW
761-6133 or 665-0334 (the house with the white- pillars)
SIMCHAT TORAH
Hakafot-singing and dancing with the
Torah and the Jewish people.
SATURDAY NIGHT, Sept. 27
at 7:30 p.m.
At HILLEL
1429 Hitl-663-3336
IOUSBU
4kc epi.~coat , Aertt %un4.Mwrt
2i. n.gdcvtctn i
an arbor, lM a'4 9i8105* telepfote 665-0406
THE HOUSE IS OPEN
The big, blue house on the corner of Catherine & Division
is open-to you and everyone from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.,
Tuesdavs through Sundays. Some folks find it a cood place
to read the paoer, study, come by with a friend for coffee,
or make friends'with someone at the House. -
If You want some help with a problem, or simply want to
talk with someone, there are people around who are easy
to talk to, including the two chaplains. If we can't help,
we might know someone who can.
Pot-luck picnics on Fridays around 6:00 p.m.
Feast of Thanksqivinq on Sundays at Noon.
CHAPLAINS; The Rev. Andrew Foster
The Rev. Bruce Campbell

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t
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MINI COURSE--UNIV
"BIOLOGICAL D
A CRITICAL

NOON LUNCHEON
SOUP and SANDWICH--S50c
MAHMOUD DIALLO
Natural Resource Economist, has traveled. ex-
tensively through regions of Sahel drought,
speaks of
"RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
IN THE SAHEL"
FRIDAY, Sept. 26
at GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
(no reservations)

A. AVAILABLE.
Mon., Sept. 29-Fri., Oct. 3
Student Accounts Office
2nd Floor, SAB
8:30-12:00, 1:00-4:30

B. SIMPLY
1. Take your' .D.
to SAB.
2. Fill out form
brief at SAB.
3. Receive a $1.50
credit on next
tuition bill.

Public Interest Research Group in Michigan

SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 6
Mini course will consist of five days of quest lectures of
3:00 and 7:30 p.m., discussions, workshops and a weekend
retreat all revolving around the idea that human behavior
is fixed by biology alone.
For more information call POINT 30.
Sign up at 4101 Nat. Sci.

" !#

______________________________________________________________________ I Ii

ON

U

n ape
PHARMAC
DEPT.

TYLENOL
TABLETS
For the millions who
should not take aspi-
rin.
100 COUNT
98c
Our Rea. $1.27
Y

Cl

I

rr nA!lilllil nrirr """"rnllt
ry f(( .tpLitrn u,,.... Ilrnnr.a

I hit ars.

PRICES GOOD THRU
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1975
Meijer reserves the right to limit quantities
according to specified limits. No sales to deal-
ers, institutions, or distributors.

ALBEE
with "C"
Hiqh potency B-complex
vitamins with 300 mq. C.
100 TABLETS
OUR REG. $5.27
$496
PHARMACY DEPT.

"
Each sefc contams
Arpoonootrate t8.-- R
%
Pyn aox.rsc tBr) .10 mg 150$
Nac'u am .. rB.7 5 ma
Cal,
Asuxpr oaotorAC~ata 10,n9 500%
acU tYgem.n C7
1 300 ^9 4 1000
!Op COSUCES
+ROBINS
+r
rt. t fill) lIDlIUlrypr,. t

Probably not. All things considered you do
what you do pretty doggone well. After all, no one
has taken your job. And you'e eating regularly.
But...
But have you ever considered what doing your
job just a little better might mean?
Money. Cold hard coin of the realm.
If each of us cared just a smidge more about
what we do for a living, we could actuallyturn that
inflationary spiral around. Better products, better
service and better management would mean savings
for all of us. Savings of much of the cash and frayed
nerves it's costing us now for repairs and inefficiency.
Point two..By taking more pride in our work
we'll more than likely see America regaining its
strength in the competitive world trade arena. When
the balance of payments swings our way again we'll
all be better off economically.
So you see-the only person who can really
do what you do any better is you.

l 'I

r . --Oq

w-

I

I

SALLY HANSEN
Hard as Nails
with NYLON
Our Re.84 c U wih
COSMETIC DEPT.
- ----------- - - - __
,Lp o SAVE 20c
with tis C ouponl
owa~d the., p..chose of:
C d SALLY HANSEN 0 N
Wrd Ac N ilc K4#-

fragrant! fluffy! cool!
the moisturizer...for after
OUR REG. $2.29

BLOW-CARE
FOR HAIR
4 FL. OZ. BOTTLE$
OUR REG. $1.87 1 with
while 36 per store last coupon
COSMETIC DEPT.
-~-------------
o SAVE 80c ©<80
Q oward the purchose of
C a * 4 oz. btil. our req. $1.87 N
Blow Care for Hair $1.07
Good thru Sat. Sept. 27, 1975 with coupon
while 36 per store last

$1

96

1

1
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t
1
1

s aa s 1411 cY
Kith NYLON our reqi. 84c wiah 1
uoanoo
Good thru Sat. Se. 2.2,1975

PHARMACY DEPT.

ID Gdupoo limited to anepet itesn and per pet
M.eijer'THRIIY ACREI

. I

I

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,90DEPT
690

[ r g-+ imtr .FJoeprisn~ e ~ws

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