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September 23, 1975 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-23

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Tuesday, September 23, 1975
Judge orders delay..
on ending girl's lie
MORRISTOWN, N.J. (,P) -- courtroom that had been locked
Attorneys arguing whether med- to prevent overcrowding, said
ical devices keeping Karen Ann the attorneys should be pre-
Quinlan alive should be discon- pared to answer the following
nected were given four weeks questions:
yesterday to answer unprece- -"Is this court to place its,
dented legal and medical ques- stamp of approval to medical
tions raised by the case. procedures that may result in
Superior Court Judge Paul the termination of life for Kar- -
Muir ordered the lawyers to re- en Quinlan, or may result in
turn Oct. 20 to help him de- death or damage to some of
cide whether he should grant her vital organs that may
the "extraordinary relief" place her life beyond redemp-
sought by the comatose wo- tion?"
man's adoptive father, Joseph -"Should this court, in the
Quinlan of Landing, N.J. absence of applicable law,
leave the definition of death to
QUINLAN filed suit 10 days doctors, Karen's parents, or
ago asking the court to order both?"
St. Clare's Hospital in Denville "Does the present conditionK
to disconnect the respirator that of Karen Quinlin, in light of
has kept his 21-year-old daugh- present medical practice, quali-
ter alive since last April. Doc- fy her for the extraordinary ac-
tors have said the woman would tion sought in her name?"
die "within minutes" if the re- -"Assuming the proof shows
spirator were unhooked. that Karen Quinlan is legally
The suite quoted doctors as dead, is the only relief available'
saying the young woman al- cessation of the extraordinary4
ready suffered irrerarable devices?"
brain damage with no hope of Paul Armstrong, Quinlan's at- I
recovery. torney, said he also wants to
Miss Quinlan has been in a argue constitutional questions
coma since April 15 when she related to the case, including Tired
did not awaken from a night's the right of privacy and free-
sleep. Sussex County prosecu- dom of religion. He said Karen A Jackson, Michigan, man stands atop a pil
tor George Daggett, who investi- herself had indicated to her years. He is ready, willing, and obviously
gated at Muir's request, report- parents that she opposed pro- -----------
edlast week that her condi- longing vital processes in a SCHOOLS S TA Y OPEN:
tion probably was the result of terminal illness. *
"inadvertant ingestion and in- The Quinlans, who have two1
teraction of a tranquilizer and natural children, said their de- I
alcohol." I cision to file the suit was the
result of many hours of discus-j
DAGGETT said Miss Quinlan sion and reflection. They said o s o e
and some friends had been they consulted two Roman Cath-;
drinking the night before her olic priests, who agreed the re- BOSTON (I) - Teachers in i ton Teacher
condition developed. He said lief they are seeking is "God's Boston walked off the job yes- school coma
the apparent mixture by Miss will." terday, compounding problems Among the
Quinlan of alcohol and tran- M e d i c a l bills for the faced by the city's newly inte- the strike ar
quilizers was innocent and he woman's treatment already grated schools. The strike left committee d
ruled out criminal conduct in have exceeded $100,000 and many classrooms in the system ers work an
the matter. may be nearing $200,000, hos- of 76,000 pupils open but empty. week and a
Muir, addressing a packed pital sources say. The Boston School Committee teacher job
-__ordered schools open yesterday, ment continu
Idespite the teachers' decision Two union
O((Sunday to strike. i had been su
Eloisebatters u THE STRIKE came at the in Suffolk Su
outset of the third week of Last week,
school, despite marathon week- ams issued a
Send bargaining between the Bos- the strike.
1 SQtr-n e SCHL

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three
Nixon not at fault for
tape gap, says lawyer

WASHINGTON (j) - Richard Court, and Carl McGowan and*

Nixon's lawyer said yesterday
that the former president has
denied under oath any "person-;
al responsibility" for the 18 -1
minute gap in one of the White
House tapes, one of the few re-{
maining mysteries in the Water-I
gate scandals.
Attorney Herbert Miller Jr.
said Nixon made the denial be-
fore Special Watergate Prose-
cutor Henry Ruth and two mem-
bers of a grand jury who ques-
tioned him for 11 hours last
June 23 and 24.+
A DAATT T ^.2-F +.' YAi{A

Edward Tamm, of the U. S.
Court of Appeals, would rule I
on the Nixon civil suit, filed
Sept. 7, 1974.
Whatever they decide, a Su-
preme Court appeal was almost;
I certain. The Justice Depart-
ment is seeking to keep the'
Nixon records under govern-
ment control and Miller said in
doing so department lawyers
have cast doubt on Nixon's hon-
esty.
"They say Mr. Nixon is un-
trustworthy, they say Mr. Nix-

0
1

AP Photc

of work?

A PANEL of court-appointed on will distort the record, they
experts concluded before Nixon say Mr. Nixon created the 18 1
resigned the presidency that the minute gap," Miller said.
gap was the result of at least "WITH respect to the 18 1
five and perhaps as many as minute gap," Miller continued,
nine manual erasures of a cru- "Mr. Nixon was interrogated
cial conversation between Nixon by the Office of the Special
and his chief of staff H. R. Prosecutor."
Haldeman. Of the Justice Department
The conversation occurred lawyers, Miller said, "Let them
June 20, 1972, three days after challenge that his Nixon's per-
the original break-in at Demo- sonal responsibility for the tape
cratic N a t i o n a 1 Com- gap was denied under oath."
mittee headquarters. Halde- Asked after the hearing if
man's notes show the subject Nixon had denied responsibility
was Watergate. for the tape gap before the
Miller referred to the tape grand jury, Miller said yes.
gap yesterday during a three- IN A demonstration of her
hour hearing before a special tape transcribing methods Nix-
three-judge court which is con- on's secretary, Rose Mary
sidering Nixon's attempts to Woods, has said she accident-
regain ownership and control ally erased five or six of the
of the White House tapes and 42 18 minutes of the tape, but no
million documents accumulated more.
during his presidency. In his argument before the
THERE WAS no indication three judges, Miller said a nine-
when the three judges, Aubrey month-old federal law making
Robinson of the U. S. District the Nixon papers public prop-

I

erty "is facially unconstitution-
al."
The law violates Nixon rights
to privacy and damages the
rights of all future presidents
who have a right to expect that
their conversations with ad-
visers will remain confidential,
Miller said.
FOR 200 years, Miller said
presidents have had the right
to control their White House
papers after they leave office.
Miller said the 880 reels of
White House tapes "are inter-
spersed with conversations of
trusted aides, Cabinet mem-
bers, his Nixon's daughter, and
foreign leaders." Federal ar-
chivists should not be the ones
to segregate private, political
and governmental policy tapes
or papers, Miller said.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 17
Tuesday, September 23, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a 11y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 Local mail (Michigan and Ohio):
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.50 local mal
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).

le of tires he has accumulated over the past eight
able to give them to anyone who can fine a use.

~

ichers strike,
rs Union and the 1974 the school system had 94,-
mittee. 000 pupils. Enrollment slipped
e central issues in , to 85,000 last fall, and the pro-
re salaries, a school jected enrollment for this year
demand that teach- is 76,000. Attendance so far has
extra 45 minutes a been around 70 per cent.
union request for
security if enroll- SCHOOL officials say some of
ues to decline. those who formerly went to pub-
officials said they lie schools in the city have
bpoenaed to appear moved to the suburbs, some are
uperior Court today. in private schools and others
Judge Samuel Ad- simply are staying home.
an injunction against Teachers picketed the opening
of schools yesterday, but most
0i ne.m4...e..... n..4 4. ines to at.. te4s.....

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Get Ready for JIM REMPE
Winner of 10 Major Pocket Billiard Tournaments
WEDNESDAY-4 P.M. and 8 P.M.
UNION BALLROOM
Pocket Billiard Exhibition
NO CHARGE FOR ADMISSION

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L F CLJLJLJI

MIAMI (A) - Hurricane Elo-h
ise, with 42 persons already
dead in its wake, aimed
strengthening winds yesterday
at what forecasters said would
be a night-time landfall near
Mobile, Ala., and Pensacola,
Fla.
Residents along a broad Gulf
Coast strip battened down and
began evacuating low-lying
areas hurriedly as the storm re-
gained hurricane intensity in the
early morning, leaving them
with less than 18 hours notice.
RED AND BLACK hurricane
warning flags fluttered lightly
in an almost eerie calm from
Grand Island, La., 350 miles
eastward to Apalachicola, Fla.
Eloise was a killer last week
when it lashed into Puerto Rico
and the Dominican Republic,
leaving 42 dead and thousands
homeless. It weakened over Cu-
ba's mountains and sloshed into
Mexico's Yucatan peninsula
over the weekend as a relative-
ly mild tropical storm.
Tropical storms carry winds
of at least 39 m.p.h. They are
classified as hurricanes when
winds reach 74 m.p.h. Eloise
won that reclassification at 8
a.m. EDT, only about half a
day before it was expected to
thunder ashore.
"PEOPLE should take any ac-
tion they're going to take by
sundown," said Neil Frank, di-
rector of the National Hurricane
Center in Miami.
"There are hurricanes and
there are hurricanes," he said:
"On a scale from one to five,
Eloise is a one and could be a
two by the time it reaches land
... Camile in 1969 was a five.
But you can get killed in a one
if you ignore it."
Camile, which struck the Mis-
sissippi coast, was one of the
most devastating storms ever to

h

Daily Official Bulletin
hit the United States. It killed D -i-: ::fm..,uei
more than 300 persons and
caused an estimated $1.4 billion Tuesday, september 23
in damage. Bay Calendar
WUOM: Margaret Thatcher, lead-
FRANK said Eloise's winds er of Britain's conservative Party,
FonKinseddoEmoveistohehwrnat NPR, 40:30 am,
continued to move into the hur- Commission for Women: Women's
ricane's center Monday, a sign Conf. Rm., basement Ad. Bldg.,
of strengthening. 12:15 pm.
Biophysics: S. Krimm, c'Mixed-{
Heavy rains were predicted crystal Infrared Spectroscopy," 618
for Louisiana, Mississippi, Ala- P&A Bldg., 2:30 pm.
bama, Georgia and Florida. The Africa Week: "The Political Econ-!
hurrcan cener aid posi-omy of the Sahel Drought," Hen-
hurricane center said a possi- derson Rm., League - E. Berg, 10
bility of tornadoes existed in am-noon; E. Skinner, 3 pm; de-
southeastern Louisiana and Mis- bate, Berg vs Skinner, 7-9 pm; film,,
sippi, southern Alabama and Drought in Africa: Ethiopia, 1-2:301
1975 Edward Kraus Memorial Lec-
Forecasters said tide would be ture: J. S. Millis, Nat'l Fund for
five to eight feet above normal Medical Education, Case Western
near or just east of the point Reserve, "Wanted - A National
nere rste hurricane's eye Health Policy," Rackham Amph.,
whr tepm.j
crosses the coast. Physics: L. Stodolsky, Max-Planck
Inst, "Single variable Description of
SCHOOLS IN at least five Inclusive Spectra," 2038 Randall
Florida counties closed Monday Lab, 4 pm; W. Weber, Ford Sci-
entific Lab, "Surface Plasmon Re-
afternoon and students were told nances in Metal Films," 4 pm.-
to return to their homes. MARC: Bocaccio Festival - N.
In Alabama, low-lying sections Steneck, "Science and Popular Cul-
of several fishing villages on the ture in 14th Century Thought;" H.
eastrn soreof MbileBayA. Oberman, UJ. of Tubingen, "14th
eastern shtre of Mobile Bay ury Thought and the Meideval-
were evacuated. Mobile's port Renaissance Crisis," Rackham As-
was closed to all shipping. Red sembly Hall, 3 pm; Symposium -
Cross emergency equipment was "European Culture in the Age of
rused ntoMobile from Birm- Boccaccio: Medieval Fruition or
rushed into ambla., rand B ,Renaissance Crisis?" Rackham As-
ungham, Ala., and Jackson, sembly Hall, 8 pm.
Miss. R. C. College: Cutting Loose -
Big meet filmmaker Jane Lipscomb,
Big oil companies evacuated Aud. A, Angell, 7:30 pm.
as many rigs and men as pos- Human Physiology Films: S. Lee.
sible all along the Gulf of Mexi- Hall, Med Sci II, 8 pm.
co's offshore oil area. General Notices
CEW: Meetings every Tuesday,
noon - 1:15 pm, 328 Thompson;
series, "Reports from Returning
Correction Women: Research and Prograss,"
begins Sept. 30 with discussion,
The Daily incorrectly reported "The Emergence of Child Develop-
Sunday that the Emergency mental Sciences, 1910-30," and
Medical Technicians n call at meets every other Tues.; for fur-
Meia -Tcncin-n- ala ther info, 763-1353. '

U~ 11 iosion nave,
been generally peaceful since
they opened Sept. 8 under an
expanded desegregation plan, al-
though there have been some
minor racial conflicts. There
have been frequent skirmishes
at night between anti-busing
demonstrators and police in
South Boston and Charlestown.
Police have maintained a vis-;
ible presence around schools in
those two white, predominantly
Irish neighborhoods.
School enrollment, meanwhile,
has dropped steadily since inte-
gration began under federal
court orders. In the spring of

of them left the lines to attend
a midmorning rally at a crowd-
ed union hall.
Union President Henry Rob-
inson told the cheering gather-
ing of about 4,000 teachers that
he hoped they would be able to
vote on a new offer by tomorrow
or Thursday.
On Sunday, the teachers re-
jected a school committee con-
tract offer that would have giv-
en them a six per cent pay
raise, required them to work an
extra 45 minutes a week and I
provided job security for per-
manent and tenured teachers in
case of declining enrollment.

I

The Medieval and Renaissance Colleqium announces a
one-credit hour mini course to be held in conjunction with
the Fall, 1975, Boccaccio Festival. Requirements for the
course are to attend 1 ) the Festival lectures (September
22 & 23; November 6, 7. & 8; and November 20 & 21,
2) four Festival films (October 24, 25, 26, and December
5 & 6), 3) the performances of "La Mandragola" and
"Carmina Burana," and 4) a show of late Medieval and
Renaissance art in the University Art Museum (November
21 through January 4). In addition, each student will be
required to write a short (5-7 pages) paper. Further in-
formation reaardinq times and titles of performances, lec-
tures, and films may be obtained through the MARC of-
fice, N-Entryway, N-12, Low Quad (tel: 763-2066).
Students may register for the course in the MARC office.
Reaistration must be completed by September 30, 1975.
Course co-ordinator: Jeanne S. Martin, Associate Director,
MARC. Office hours: MW 10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon.

Ia-
4o Icary
* Prescriptions
0 Patent Medicines
0 Cosmetics
* Liqiuor & Wine

)
SGC Needs Students
Elections director; Responsible, enthusiastic
and honest individual to organize all aspects
at the fall SGC elections.
ALSO NEEDED
Assistants to the elections director. Interviews
for these positions will be held Monday and
Tuesday, September 29 and 30.
Need more info? Stop by the SGC of-
fices, ,3rd floor Union to sign up for
interview and to pick up an applica-
tion.

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1112 South University
Ann Arbor, Michigqn
313/663-5553

U

gtWest Side Book 5
_ O~ Used and Rare Books
Bought and Sold

hop

,

Opening Monday, Sept. 22
113 West Liberty St.
Ann Arbor, Mi. 48108
(313) 995-1891

JUDAIC STUDIES PROGRAM
invites

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the home football games are
with University Hospital. The
EMT's are with Fontana Taylor
Ambulance, which has a con-.
tract with the University Ath- I
letic Department to provide
medical assistance at the
games.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 23 12 NOON
Lunch-Discussion
"NUTRITIONAL PATTERNS AMONG
THIRD WORLD CHILDREN"
KWAMI KOFFI, Graduate Student in Public Health

ISRAELI
DANCING
TON ITE, Sept. 23
8:00 p.m
at HILLEL
1429 HILL ST.
663-3336

All interested Students and Faculty
to a
COFFEE HOUR
in
3050 FRIEZE BUILDING
Wednesday, Sept. 24, 3-5 p.m.
There will be a discussion of the program,
its offerings and future development.

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INTERNATIONAL CENTER - 802 E. Madison St.
The Tuesday lunch-discussions are held weekly durinq Fall
and Winter terms, and are sponsored by the Ecumenical
Campus Center and the International Center. Lunch is
provided and served by Church Women United of Ann
Arbor.
What a Rush!
at
PSI UPSILON I
ofE
MoaP rwt smr ~~~ w f

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Indan JewelrySecua
7 daJde Taup',ar.t
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2 for 1 SPECIAL
STUDENTS & FACULTY ONLY
0 LIQUID SILVER (SHIMMERING WATERS) strung with your choice
of turquoise, corral, heshi or mother of pearl.
' REGULAR $12.95 SPECIAL 2 for 1
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REGULAR $29.95 SPECIAL 2 for 1
The above is genuine INDIAN JEWELRY not a cheap imitation.
YES, genuine silver (not plated) with authentic stones.
LIMIT TOTAL OF 1 SPECIAL PER CUSTOMER
0 THE PUKA & HESHI LOOK
REGULAR $2.95 SPECIAL 2 for 1
2 LOCATIONS-OPEN 7 DAYS
0 Gift Shop in Marriott Inn and Win Schuler's Restaurant, Plymouth Rd, at
23 Expressway. Hours 7 a.m. to 11 p.m.

ATTENTION LS&A STUDENTS!
TIRED OF BORING CLASSES?
WANT TO MAKE A CHANGE IN YOUR
EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT?
WANT TO FIND OUT HOW THE BUREAUCRACY MAKES DECISIONS?
The LSA STUDENT GOVERNMENT can help
The Government is currently making appointments to the
following College Committees:
Student Faculty Policy Board
College Curriculum Committee

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