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September 20, 1975 - Image 12

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-20
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rage bix THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, September 20, 1975 Saturday, September 20, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A

DEFENSE VERY SPOTTY
Card's offense potent

By MICHAEL WILSON
Without a doubt, the Stan-
ford Cardinals remember the
last time they visited Michigan
Stadium back in 1973, when
they suffered through an em-
barrassing 47 to 10 defeat be-
fore 90,000 enthusiastic fans.
That victory avenged a one-
point defeat Stanford handed
Michigan in the 1972 Rose Bowl.
THIS YEAR'S September 20
contest at Michigan Stadium
stands as one of the high points
of the season for both teams as
Stanford will be coming off an
away game with Penn State,
and Michigan opens its tough-
est non-conference schedule in
years with the Stanford game.
The Cardinals offense offers
a stiff challenge to the Wol-
verine defense with the potent
passing o feither Mike Cordova
or Guy Benjamin, and the ex-
plosive running of a healthy
Ron Inge. Coach Jack Christian-
son has all key personnel re-
turning this year, and plans to
operate out of the I formation
as well as the traditional pro-
set.
"We should be very solid of-
fensively," Christianson notes.
"Though we won't be starting
many seniors, we'll have ex-
perienced players at every po-
sition. We could be scoring a
lot of points this year."
THE CARDINALS are deep
in quarterbacks and receivers
this year. Junior signal-callers
Benjamin and Cordova each
have an excellent shot at' the
starting job with added com-
petition coming from senior

Jerry Waldvogal. Waldvogal, in
his only start of the season last
year, completed 65 per cent of
his passes for 229 yards against
Michigan.
Stanford's receiving corps is
led by 1973 all-conference selec-
tion Bill Singler and junior
Tony Hill. Hill led the Cardi-
nals in pass-catching last year,
grabbing 34 aerials for 542
yards.
Tight end Ted Pappas is her-
alded by Christianson as "one
of the outstanding tight ends on
the Coast." Pappas will receive
stiff competition from 6-foot 8-
inch sophomore Mark Hoaglin.
THE OTHER dimension to
the Cardinal attack is the run-
ning game and the main man
in this department is junior
Inge. "Ron Inge is the class of
our running backs," Christian-
son remarked. "We plan to get
the ball to him more this year
than in the past, and hopefully
the I formation will allow us to
do that."
Complimenting the veteran
running backs will be an ex-
perienced offensive line led by
guards Tom Tipton and Alex
Karakozoff, and tackle Al Ten
Bruggencate. An added plus in
this department will be the
depth sophomores Mark Hill
and Bill Hubbard should give
the Cardinals.
STANFORD'Skicking
game remains solid with the
returning toe of Mike Langford.
The defense however threa-
tens to pose serious problems.
With graduation eliminating the
entire defensive line and two

of three linebackers, Christian-
son faces a stiff challenge re-
building.
"Our defense will definitely
be young and inexperienced,"
Christianson said. "Because of
the inexperienced in our line-
up, enthusiasm may have to
carry us in the early going.
We'll have to run to the ball
and hustle all over the field."
ALTHOUGHtheCardi-
nals lost all-Coast linebacker
Gordy Riegel and two-year
starters Forrie Martin and
John Snider, five lettermen re-
turn to battle for starting nods.
Senior Geb Church leads the
crew which includes Rich Mer-
lo, Dan Francis and John Olen-
chalk.
Stanford's defensive second-
ary essentially remained un-
tounched by graduation. Juniors
Paul Skrabo and Rich Waters
hold down the corners while
seniors Jeff Siemans and Ger-
ald Wilson, and sophomore
Tom Lynn vie for the safety
spots.

Composi
September 20
Stanford at MICHIGAN
Penn State at Ohio State
Miami of Ohio at Michigan State
South Dakota at Wisconsin
Missouri at Illinois
Notre Dame at Purdue
Western Michigan at Minnesota
Northern Illinoisat Northwestern
Iowa at Syracuse
Indiana at Nebraska
September 27
Baylor at MICHIGAN
North Carolina at Ohio State
North Carolina State at Michigan
State
Wisconsin at Missouri
Illinois at Texas A&M
Purdue at Southern California
Oregon at Minnesota
Northwestern at Notre Dame
Penn State at Iowa
Utah at Indiana
October 4
Missouri at MICHIGAN
Ohio State at UCLA
Michigan State at Notre Dame
Kansas at Wisconsin
Washington State at Illinois
Miami of Ohio at Purdue
Ohio at Minnesota
Northwestern at Arizona
southern California at Iowa
Indiana at North Carolina State
Baylor at South Carolina
Army at Stanford
October 11
MICHIGAN at Michigan State
Iowa at Ohio State
Wisconsin at Purdue
Minnesota at Illinois
Indiana at Northwestern
Arkansas at Northwestern

te Schedule
October 18
Northwestern at MICHIGAN
Wisconsin at Ohio State
Michigan State at Minnesota
Purdue at Illinois
Iowa at Indiana
Missouri at Colorado
Stanford at Washington
October 25
Indiana at MICHIGAN
Ohio State at Purdue
Illinois at Michigan State
Northwestern at Wisconsin
Minnesota at Iowa
November 1
MICHIGAN at Minnesota
Indiana at Ohio State
Michigan State at Purdue
Illinois at Wisconsin
Iowa at Northwestern
November 8
Purdue at MICHIGAN
Ohio State at Illinois
Michigan State at Indiana
Wisconsin at Iowa
Northwestern at Minnesota
November 15
MICHIGAN at Illinois
Minnesota at Ohio State
Northwestern at Michigan State
Indiana at Wisconsin
Iowa at Purdue
November 22
Ohio State at MICHIGAN
Michigan State at Iowa
Wisconsin at Minnesota
Illinois at Northwestern
Purdue at Indiana

I

By JON CHAVEZ
This season, Ohio State's
Woody Hayes has been crying to
anyone who will listen of how
tough his schedule is with the
addition of Penn State, North
Carolina and UCLA.
Some might shed a tear in
sympathy. At Purdue they just
laugh uproariously.
COACH ALEX Agase's Boiler-
makers are cursed with probab-
ly the thoughest schedule in the
nation. Six of their opponents
ranked from No. 2 to No. 12 in
the final Associated Press poll.
An undefeated season would
mean knocking off USC (2),
Michigan (3), Ohio State (4),
Notre Dame (6), Miami of Ohio
(10), and Michigan State (12)
with Wisconsin thrown in for
fun.
Agase's attitude in view of all
this is admirable.
"I'm not the kind of football
coach that at this stage of the
game will say, '7-4 would be a
good year.' That's conceding
four defeats. If you're better
than me, you'd better prove it
on Saturday," he says ada-
mantly.
LARGE WORDS from a coach
whose team was 4-6-1 last year
Still, it was that kind of talk
last season that enabled a shaky
bunch of sophomores to upset
Notre Dame 31-20 and tie Mi-
ami (O.) 7-7.

This fall, the crafty coach has
40 lettermen returning to West
Lafayette, 13 of which were
starters. Eight others started
various games.
At halftime the Boilermaker
band features the "Golden
Girl." For two halfs Agase will
feature his "Golden Boy," quar-
terback Mark Vitali, who passed
for over 1,000 yards last fall.
The Purdue coach feels the 6-4,
191-pound junior "has matured
now and has .got the experience
and confidence he needs to be-
come a good quarterback."
At tailback and fullback are
Scott Dierking and Mike Pruitt
who rushed for 594 and 553
yards respectively last season,
good for the No. 9 and No. 10
conference rushing spots.
LAST YEAR'S offensive line
was "as green as grass" in
Agase's words. But with a sea-
son under their belts senior
tackles Ken Long and Jeff Sta-
pleton and junior guards Tom
Gibson and Connie Zelencik
could do a fine job. Gibson,
though, has just come off of
knee surgery and the Boiler-
makersrdon't appearto have
much depth behind him or the
rest of the line.
Wide receiver is another prob-
lem. Jesse Townsend is no Lar-
ry Burton and has but six min-
utes of playing time. Reggie
Arnold and Paul Beery are ex-
perienced, but average.

As far as defense is con-
cerned, Agase hopes to shore up
last year's leaky backfield (9th
in the Big Ten) by adding in-
creased speed.
To meet this end, he has
moved reserve tailback Mike
Northington to cornerback to
play beside speedy Pat Harris.
ANCHORING Purdue's defen-
sive line will be Outland Trophy
candidate and All-Big Ten
tackle Ken Novak. At 6-7 274
pounds the rugged Novak has
pro scouts-,drooling, "We've al-
ways felt Ken has been blessed
far beyond the average ball
player in talent," insists defen-
sive coach Tom Roggeman.
If so, Novak may have to car-
ry the weight for more than one
player, as the only other return-
ing starter -is middle guard
Mark Gorgal.
Agase's corps of linebackers
are all back. This includes Joe
Sullivan and Bob Mannella, the
top two tacklers from last year's
squad, who may be called upon
to do a lot more tackling this
year.
"We have a tough schedule,"
admits Agase candidly, "there's
no question about that. But if
this squad progresses like we
think it can, we have strong
feelings that it will be competi-
tive with the schedule we play."
Actually, 7-4 would be a good
year.

USC, BUCKEYES AND OTHERS

Minnesota looks
* - -www-wm -w w--

Purdue faces tough schedule but defense rem

By JON CHAVEZ
The 1975 Minnesota Gophers
are seeking to change their im-
age and head coach Cal Stoll is
doing everything humanly pos-
sible to bring that about.
SO STOLL has come up with
a new maroon and gold uniform
to replace the old solid gold
ones, a huddle which hasn't
been seen for a while, and a
new offense (to replace the
Veer--T) which he calls "the
Minnesota Multiple Pro-Style
Offense."
He would be smarter to pur-
chase a good used defense from
the neighboring Vikings. For
without one, the '75 Golden Go-
phers might not be any better
than last year's 4-7 team.
When the Gopher defensemen
"dug in" last season, opposing

offense
tune o
last il
against
the pa
stalwaz
was gc
the sin
"WE
mouths
fesses
sipated
year
even a
game
"I t.
for po
since
sity,"
Such
where
turns,
S

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Already without No. 1 QB,
Baylor must pu miracle
By JEFF SCHILLER Bears suffered acrushing placements is
it's midnight for "Cinderella" blow when quarterback Mark . ever-
Baylor. The 1974 "Whiz Kids" Jackson was lost for the year The ground
are seeing their defense turn because of an injury sustained questionable..
into a pumpkin. Injuries and during the season opener by center Car
graduation will once again rele- against Mississippi. over from a st
gate the Bears to long shot sta- There are however ,bright and guard Re
tus, though obviously this has spots and a nucleus with which denda k
not proved detrimental in the to work. Offensively, Baylor re- dependable
past. turns four starting interior line-ndsand of their top ri
For those with short memo- then, ubotetrtngendslbad- back Jackson
ries, Baylor was the surprise en fensively, the Bears five start- holes at both
of last year's college season. back. The de
Picked by the "experts" to ers back from last season. pound tailback
continue their annual losing Baylor's major offensive lin will be a k
ways, the Bears shocked every- weapon may be the pass, for Defensively
one by winning their first South- the Bears are deep in receiv- some good d
west Conference title in school ing quality,, Ricky Thompson Cotton Bowl
history, and a berth in the Cot- and Alcy Jackson are excel- Ken Quesenb
ton Bowl, lent split ends, and Sam Har- dle guard in
This year however, Coach per is solid at tight end. a lot of po
of the Year Grant Teaff must Ironically, the loss of quarter- but inexperi
perform his miracles while back Jackson may be a help Their perfor
working with a notable lack here ,as the junior signal-caller ably be the
of experience at the "skill po- was a far better runner than factor in d
sition". Just recently, the passer. The quality of his re- lor's success

again
uncertain how-
game's status is
Baylor's line, led
l Gregory (moved
arting tackle slot)
11 Tipton is excel-
Pat McNeil is a
ballcarrier -"and
he Bears lost one
unners in quarter-
n, and there are
tailback and wing-
velopment of 205-
Cleveland Frank-
key factor.
y, Baylor boasts
eep backs led by
Defensive MVP
berry, a fine mid-
John Oliver, and
tentially talented
enced youngsters.
mance will prob-
most important
determining Bay-
or lack of same.

s.d : f...

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blend of specially selected portions of beef and lamb. It is lightly seasoned and cooked
to sear the outside so that the iuice and flavor are sealed inside. The meat is cooked
to order on the Autodoner, which gives it that "charcoal like" flavor. Served with
Raw Onions, Tomatoes on Greek Pita Bread. 1.45
SHISH-KA-BOB SANDWICH Succulent, marinated 'Greek "Ka-Bobs" broiled to perfec-
tion and nestled between thick wedges of our own special Greek Pita Bread. Served with
Onions and Tomatoes. 1.40
GYROS PLATE A fine meal in itself, served on a plate with a generous portion of meat,
Raw Onions and Tomatoes. 2.25
MOUSAKA Sauteed eaa plant and potatoes covered with a generous layer of pured
around beef and our special seasoning, then topped with special cream sauce. 1.75 i
PASTITSIO A hefty portion of pure ground beef and tender macaroni, slowly baked ,
with a delicate cream sauce topping. 1.75 -
DOLMADES-"STUFFED GRAPE'LEAVES" Made with around beef, mixed with rice,
wrapped in grape leaves and topped with a special lemon sauce. 1.75
SPINACH PIE Fresh spinach mixed with Greek cheese. 1.75
COMBINATION PLATE Pastitsio, Mousaka,
}IDolmades, Spinach Pie, and Gyros. 3.65"
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7

LEVI'S shirts you in pr
borrowed from Americar
rugged-as-the-Old-Wes
cotton casuals in a sele
that are naturally relax
jeans and corduroys. E
tones. Sizes S, M,

JacoIbs( i-~

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