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September 20, 1975 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-20
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Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, September 20, 1975 Saturday, September 20, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. . .. .

BeIY
By BILL STIEG
Boring? To some, yes. Con-
servative? Relatively. Machine-
like? In a way.
Effective? Definitely, abso-
lutely, undoubtedly.
Bo Schembechler's theories
and practices concerning of-
fense have been called many

Lytle

lead-

attack

Philosopher

Hayes

ecti

things. But one thing's for
certain: his system works.
Schembechler no longer wor-
ries about criticism aimed at
his offense. In his six years at
Michigan, he has proven that
his style of play is the most ef-
fective at achieving his primary
goal: winning football games.

I

I

t

Table of Contents
Michigan offense ...................... Page 2
Michigan defense ...................... Page 3
1975 Schedule .................. .. Page 4
Opponents: Wisconsin thru OSU ...... Pages 5-14
Woody talks.........................Page 15
SUPPLEMENT EDITOR: Brian Deming
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Tom Cameron, Al Hrap-
sky, Leba Hertz, Rich Lerner, Ray O'Hara
STAFF WRITERS: Jon Chavez, Jeff Schiller, Bill Stieg
and Mike Wilson
COVER DESIGN: Kathy Ryan
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I

He's won 58 times since com-
ing to Ann Arbor in 1969, and
a goodly portion of those vic-
tories were the result of a
steady, time-consuming, ball-
control offense.
At Michigan, the old cliche,
"Your opponent can't score
when you have the ball" is
treated as the Holy Writ.
Schembechler uses the for-
ward pass sparingly, as if it
were an exotic spice to be
used when his meat-grinder
running game becomes too
bland or predictable.
This, at least, has been the
case the past three years, when
Michigan started Dennis Frank-
lin at quarterback and wanted
to take full advantage of his
running skills. Franklin might
have been an excellent passer,
but no one will ever know -
his end sweeps and broken field
running were too successful to
bother switching to a passing
attack.
This year; things could be dif-
ferent. Michigan's top two quar-
terbacks, Mark Elzinga and
Rick Leach, are best known for
their passing abilities, and nei-
ther is singled out for outstand-
ing running skills.
So it's not , unlikely that
Michigan fans will see more
forward passes this year, des-
pite Bo's reputation. Many
have forgotten that the Michi-
gan career record - holder
for most passes attempted is
Schembechler - coached Don
Morehead.
Both Elzinga and Leach can
throw well, and have some very
capable targets at the receiving
end. At split end is Rick White,
a big yet fast junior with hands
See PASSING, pg. 4

Editor's Note: At the Big Ten
Kickoff luncheon held in Chicago
late in July, Ohio State football
coach Woody Hayes took the po-
dium before an audience of about
twenty reporters to give a brief
summary of what the 1975 Buck-
eye team would look like. He pro-
ceeded to talk about his offense
and defense and went down the
line talking about all the indi-
viduals. The speech was essential-
ly similar to all the speeches the
other Big Ten coaches gave until
he came to the Buckeye kickers.
When Woody began to speak
about Tom Klaban, the Ohio State
place kicker, he digressed onto
subjects far from football. The
following are excerpts from the
conclusion of the speech.. The
speech was recorded by Daily
sports writer Jon Chavez. The
transcript was edited by Sports
Editor Brian Deming.
I think it would be worthwhile
for me to mention quite a bit
about our kickers because we're
enormously fortunate. We're
enormously fortunate that a
man had the great guts to make
up his mind to get out from be-
hind the iron curtain. And it
took him seven years to get his
plans made to get out of there.
He got his wife, himself, and
his two children out.
Three years ago that man
came walking down my hall on
a Saturday morning and he in-
troduced me to his son in rather
broken English. I asked him, I
said, "How long have you been
in this country?"
He said, "Three years."
I said, "Well, what do you
thinkof America?" And get
ready for a blast, because he
jumped straight up in the air
and he yelled, 'I LOVE IT!'"
How many Americans could
you get to yell that loud? By
God, I brought some people over
from Viet Nam that just got out.
They've seen the light in here
and they like that Ohio State
"Fight the .Team Across the
Field". They're not too corn-
ball to sing it.
I'm so damn tired of shoulder-
shruggers. Name me one hero
we have left. Lincoln andethat's
all. We've torn Washington
down. This year they came out
with a storyon Thomas Jeffer-
son with his Negro mistress.
Hell, I don't care if he had one
or not. He was a damn great
man. But tear him down.
And in so many of our col-
leges of journalism all they
want to do is go out and get
a story. It doesn't make a
damn bit of difference whether
it's true or not. Just so it will
be a great story. And then
they'll put all their narnes un-
der it. Great. I'm tired of that
ki n I of jo'r wlism ay
X hen' I wrx ip way y ars

ago, years ago, the Big Four. I
wonder who can name the Big
Four of the twenties? Who were
they in sports? Who were the
Big Four? Paul can name them.
I know damn well he can. He's
younger than I am.
But it was Jack Dempsey, the
best fighter of all until Joe Louis
came along. I'd of loved to see
them fight. That 'a been a dan-
dy. Alright. Sure, Tunney
whipped him. I rooted for Tun-
ney. But Tunney didn't catch
him when he was at his best,
you can be sure of that.
Alright, then here's the
"grand slammer". Who was the
only "Grand Slammer"? Not
even Jack Nicklaus has been
the "grand Slammer". Who was
it? . . . Bobby Jones, you're
damn right, sure.
Then there was a notorious
homosexual you never heard
of in those days as a homo-
sexual. Just as a great tennis
player. Later you heard about
him as a homosexual, but at
that time you didn't. What
was his name? Bill Tilden.
You're damn right. Alright.
The fourth one was probably
the best of all. Oh, lately they've
come out and exposed him. Sure.
Lately, they will do that. Sure,
he chased around quite a bit,
and drank when he shouldn't
have, and all that sort of thing.
But I'll tell you what he did
do. le went to many, many hos-
pitals to see kids. Andhhe prom-
ised 'em, "I'll get a home run
tomorrow and I'll bring you the
game ball." By God, he'd get it.
Babe Ruth.
You know, back in those
days, there were times there
werewreal heroes. Now what
do we do today? We tear
them down, tear them down.
And hell, what arehwe doing?
We're tearing ourselves down,
that's all we're doing. That's
all we're doing. And if you
don't have people to look up
to, you have no place to go.
No place to go. Am I old-
fashioned corn-ball? You're
damned well I am. But prove
me wrong. You've got to have
that.
And that's why these college
sports of our' must bekclean.
M\ust be. We've got to keep it
that way. We've got to play with
youngsters who are truly getting
an education. Are they all
smart? Hell, no.
But I'll bet you we've had
more doctors and lawyers. And
I'm not proud of those lawyers
noW adays even thou gh my son's
one. I'm not so proud of that.
Not when we're orly getting two
per cent convictions on crimin--

als. We've got too many law-
yers. You may quote me. We
have too many. We're getting
too many crooks off: The law is
not serving its purpose.
I didn't come here to talk
about those things, but I worry
a hell of a lot more about those
things than I worry about our
tough schedule. This is probably
the toughest we've ever had.
But if I was only to worry
about me and my schedule,
then I'd be selfish. And I like
to feel I'm a little bit of a cut
above other people. I can
think in terms of this nation.
And believe me, I know what
makes it great.
Because I can get that great
feeling in the locker room be-
fore our ball game. I see a
bunch of youngsters dedicated
into playing together. And how
they respect and how they like
one another.
And you can talk about Arch's
great record, and it is that, and
he'd be the first to tell you how
much those blockers meant. But
it goes farther than 'that. Be-
cause if you're going to have a
Heisman award winner, you've
got to have the ball. He doesn't
win it by sitting on the bench
too long.
You've got to be out in front
where you can run that guy
and protect that lead. And if
you've got a bunch of line-
men that are stepping back
to protect the passers they're
not going to be charging and
opening holes for your Heis-
man Award winner.
Because football is an aggres-
sive game. You take it to them.
You take it to them. That's the
way it's played. And it is the
single greatest, greatest sport.
Incidentally,' you know what
the oldest show in television is?
Gunsmoke is off the air. Bonan-
za is gone. I Love Lucy's been
gone for years. The oldest show
in television is The Woody
Hayes Show.
And do you know why it's last-
ed? Well sure, Woody Hayesbhas
lasted. But because it's about
something positive and people
love positive things.
I pick up the papers now
and I have to jump over that
front page. Now I've got the
sports page and I hear all
about hold-outs and all this.
It's so damn disgusting. Hell,
that's all you hear about now-
adays.
I don't see how a man could
fight people for so long and then
go out and play football for
them. I just can't see how.
If I had a football player that
acted like that, I'd say, "Son,

don't bother to come out. We'll
be better out without you."
But the reason that show's
still on is because it is positive.
It's about positive football play-
ers. We put them on that show.
That's the greatest thing that's
ever happened to Ohio State
football.
When I went there they
thought Ohio State football play-
ers were just a bunch of big
lugs. And then they put them on
the show and they find out. HelL,
they're just like every other stu-
dent in the university. They're
like the youngster next door.
Who could ever impress you
more than Arch Griffin?
Oh, the sociologists are now
writing about the Griffins. Hell,
I knew that three years ago. I
had them both on the television
show two years ago. I want
them to answer questions and I
doubt if either one of them had
ever read a psychology book.
But they know how to raise
kids. They know how to do it.
And that is the one thing that
worries me in our society
most. Because when I get into
all of these great homes, when
I'm looking for a football
player, I'm looking for a great
home. B e c a u s e they've
learned to play on a great
team long before I get them.
Because a good football play-
er is team-oriented. You'll find
that. Itwon't turn a youngster
down that's come from a bad
home. I'll take him. I'll give
him a greater chance than any-
body else. But I'll have to coach
him a lot harder than anybody
else. I know that. Because this
great home thing is the great-
est thing in the world.
Last spring I was recruiting a
youngster from a city in Ohio.
And he told me, we sat down to
talk very seriously. And he was
in my office and he- said
"Coach," he said, "My mother
isn't going to live very long. She
has a malignancy. But," he
said, "when you come to visit
us don't you let on, don't you
dare let on." So I said, "I prom-
ise you, I won't."
So a few days later I went
to his home and I met with
his father and mother, talked
to them, had a wonderful
evening. I kept checking on
the youngster and very short-

ly aft
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Ohio
with (
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tinue
coach

1

Daily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
THE WISCONSIN DEFENSE closes in on - converted Wolverine
fullback Rob Lytle in last week's season opening 23-6 win.
Schembechler switched the erstwhile tailback, who shared
time with Gordy Bell last year, to utilize his adroit running
ability. While Lytle gives up a lot in size, 6-1, 195, he makes up
for it in aggressiveness and speed.
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