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September 19, 1975 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, September t v, IV t

Page Ten THE MiCHIGAN DAILY Friday, September I '~3, I '11)

Mayor recall readied-

i

War stats distorted
-ex-CIA official

(Continued from Page 1)
more emphasis on social serv-
ices.
BECAUSE reorganizing the
funding proposal would take
months, the Democrats have
advocated an emergency alloca-
tion of $500,000 for social serv-
ices, while HRP has advocated
spending $1,000,000 in emergen-
cy monies.
However, in order to facilitate
quick dispersion of the $2.4 mil-
lion, HRP and the Republicans
then struck a compromise -
taking away many of the funds
earmarked for downtown im-

provements and refunneling the
money into human services and
city code inspection - and
thus have the necessary votes
to put it through council.
But Wheeler promises to veto
the measure if passed at the
emergency meeting at 5 p.m. to-
day.
COUNCILWOMAN
Kathy Kozachenko (HRP-First
Ward), when questioned last
night whether she would vote
with the Republicans com-
mented "I sure as hell will --
we've (the HRP) had it with

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them . . . we don't trust the
Democrats to come up with a
better proposal."
She said that the Democrats
were "completely unwilling" to
compromise with her and it was
"incredibly authoritarian for
them to do that."
"With drastic unemployment,
I don't think we can delay this
for six months," Kozachenko
declared.
The councilwoman reported
that the HRP has not given
their support to the recall drive
should it begin, but "we would
advocate picketing his office."
HENRY conceded that ob-
taining the necessary 10,000
signatures to force a recall
election would be tough. "I
don't think it'll be easy," he
commented, "but we're going
to try."
Co u n c i 1w o m an
Elizabeth Keogh (D-First Ward)
seemed to think that the chan-
ces of getting the required
amount of signatures is "very,
very small. I don't think it's go-
ing to succeed," she said, "but
there may be a lot of people
out to get him - he's black
and he's been around for a long
time . . . he's not a white lib-
eral."
IF THE necessary signatures
were obtained and if Wheeler
was voted out of office, she
said, Council would have to ap-
point a temporary mayor

(Continued from Page 1)
"THESE PEOPLE all made
their positions by screwing up
intelligence on Vietnam," Ad-
ams testified."
NLF and North Vietnamese
forces caught U. S. defenses by
surprise Jan. 30, 1968, attack-
ing not only Saigon and the
U. S. embassy there but 40
of the 44 South Vietnam pro-
vince capitals.
Some observers credit Tet
with ultimately leading to
President Lyndon Johnson's de-
cision not to seek a new term
in office.
Meanwhile, a member of the
Senate Intelligence Committee
said the Defense Department
may have avoided obeying an
order to destroy stockpiles of
chemical and biological war-
fare agents by simply transfer-
ring the poisons to the Central
Intelligence Agency.
"I am very suspicious that
whoever did it, instead of obey-
ing the presidential order,
sneaked the stuff out the back
door and then prepared an in-
ventory for high authority to
suggest that it had all been
destroyed," said Sen. Walter
Mondale, (D-Minn.).
THE SENATE committee to-
day completed its public hear-

ings into the CIA's, secret of
cache of deadly poisons with-
out pinpointing who was direct-
ly responsible for defying the
order to destroy such sub-
stances.
"Like other examples discov-
ered in previous executive ses-
sions ... the case of the shell-
fish toxin illustrates how elu-
sive the chain of command can
be in the intelligence commun-
ity, Chairman Frank Church,
(D-Idaho), said ,as he gaveled
the hearings to a close after
three days of testimony.

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U of M and EMU 50-yd.line
home game football tickets
being given away at

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Name
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