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September 04, 1975 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two .

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, September 4, 197

Page Two\ THE MICHIGAN DAILY ThursdayF September \^,31915
/ .l "°.-ii5 '' . -. .'~.....Q .......:.. "r 4 ,g..
I ;4i.i*' ~a ' i+3 m..L cw:~. .

CYCYLING NEEDS
FOR $75
See the exciting selection of famous:
Schwinn-Raleigh---Peugeot
Mercicr-Motobecane
* 3 Speed English Bikes
o Complete service on all makes
* We Sell Quality Bicycles and every-
thing in Cycling-Baskets, Horns,
Generator Sets, Backpacks, and
HUGE LOCK SELECTION
* The Friendly Store where students
get their "Wheels"
* Great Campus Location
Campus Bike & Toy'

!
tttCl

Crush
all smokes
dead out.

A PiibfcSerice d
This Newspaper d
TvB Advend.ng Cmp"l

ymoud
you?
Of course you would.
You work hard. And you're good
at it. Like most Americans.
But; if all of us did just a
little letter, we'd wind
up with better products, better
services and even more
pride in the work we do.
America. It only works
as well as we do.
Tht Wiii*ai Comm *ssio n/on ? ihn,. Washingto,,$

Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
The Farmers Market is a Saturday morning extravaganza, where arts and craft objects, fruits, vegetables, baked goods, and
plants are on sale in an open air market. If you get up early, you can get the best produce in town.

--.

F

i 3
}

I i

Fieg l'S
1891 of ann arbor

Farmers Market: A place
to be, buy on Sat. morning

514 E. William

662-0035

(44
PROJECT OUTEC
Department of Psychology
Experiential learning in over 25 different settings
pena l facilities, mental institutions, hospitals,
community services, s c h o s, halfway houses,
homes, etc.
If interested: COME TO-
OUTREACH MASS MEETING
Tuesday, Sept. 9 7:30 p.m.
HILL AUDITORIUM
Questions?- Registration Information and Procedures?-
COME TO Corner House (Introductory Psychology Building)
554 Thompson Street (corner of Thompson and Madison)
or call 764-9279, 764-9179
HELP OTHERS TO HELP THEMSELVES!
Psychology 201 No Prerequisites

(

I I
J t/

OPEN DAILY
8:30-5:30
MON. & FRI.
'TIL 8:30
AN
f '2
L ~§~Y

By JEFF RISTINE
Every Wednesday and Satur-
day morning during the hot,
summer and autumn months,
dozens of men and women from
farms near Ann Arboar load
vegetables, fruit and plants into
the backs of their pickup trucks
and station wagon, and bring
them to a large, three-sided
area not far from the downtown
section of town.
An don those mornings, hun-
dreds of persons drive, bicycle
or walk to the Farmer's Market
to'spend their money on bagsful
of homegrown goodies for the
dinner table. Both sides of the
transactions are happy - they
have eliminated a middleperson
(the supermarket), resulting in
a little more money for the
farmer and slightly fresher food
for the consumer.
"THERE AREN'T many mar-
kets like this in the world,"
says a woman who has been
bringing cabbage and other
food to the market for 26 years,
"It's unique.

She explains the open-air
market's success, in part, by
the growing "back-to-nature"
kick and a general awareness
on the part of citydwellers con-
cerning the importance of farm-
ers. "Without farmers," she
says, "there wouldn't be any
food. There wouldn't be nothin'."
In addition to products from
the soil, many of the market's
sellers offer homebaked edibles
and, in the proper season, honey
and cider. Others display 'pot-
tery, jewelry and leatherwork-
all handled as if the artisans
had never even heard the
phrase "mass production."
REGULAR market-goers will
tell you to get there early. The
best stuff .is often sold shortly
after the 8 a.m. opening, and
a few farmers head homeward
before the market officially
closes at 3 p.m.
"This is good stuff!" ex-
claimed a woman as she sur-
veyed her table of eggs. Shel
said various persons from her1
family have been bringing pro-

duce to the corner of Fifth St.
and Cath'erine for half a cen-
tury. Those who rent the mar-
ket booths, she explains, are
often able to hold the line on
prices when inflation' takes its
toll at the A&P.
The Farmer's Market also
offers endless opportunities for
camera buffs. Almost a micro-
cosm of Ann Arbor itself, all
kinds of people-the young and
the old, the rich and the poor-
can be found strolling through
the market place in search of
something good to eat. Watch-
ing the people is just as pleasant
as filling your shopping bag.
The products, of course, fol-
low the seasons. Look for
squash, apples and cider in the
fall; strawberries and tomatoes
in the. summer. Whenever you
go, you can expect the disap-
pearing. pleasure of being dealt
with and talked to on a personal
level. The farmers enjoy their
work, and the shoppers are de-
lighted by the market's friendly,
casual and open atmosphere.

Lbj

Local vegetables co-ops: Beating
the high costs of eating

How to
coordinate
a contrast..

By PAULINE LUBENS
While the high cost of living'
in Ann Arbqr digs deeper and
deeper into the pockets of city
residents, there are several
ways of alleviating the prob-
lem-the chief source of relief
coming in the form of three
local food co-ops: the Fourth

Ave. People's Food Co-op, the
Pegple's Food Co-op on Pack-
ard and the Ann Arbor Itemized
Fruit and Vegetable Co-op.
The three organizations pro-
vide fresh produce and other
gastronomic delights at remark-
ably low prices. However, they
do not carry meat, consequently

i

meat-eaters m u s t look
where for bargains.

Begin with a confrast. . . in
your knit Farah shirt jacket.
Coordinating, yet contrasting
material around epauleffes,
collar and breast pocket. Then,
put your shirt jacket fogefher
with a pair of flared Farah
slacks with contempo front
pockets. Choice of mix and
match colors.
FARAH*
t. 761-5240

else-

I4

SERIES ONLY NOW ON SALE

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN°
PRESENTS IN THE
POWER CENTER

318 S. Main S

I

I

OADWAY'S FIRST .ct
GIC MUSICAL SHOW "AGREAT DELIGHT..TAP
.DANCING, CHORUS LINES
PUNCH LINES AND
PRATFALLS"-CBS
"THREE COINS INETHE FOUNTAIN"
"HIGH HOPES" r
and many mores
November 7, 8, 9
nPersnAll Evengsp
Wth heBroiysu ' Sunday Matinee: 3pm
'- "S-E-N-S-A-T+O-N-A-L" - Cue
AND
ebr12,14 "
Aft Even ns.8pnm F

Overbeck Bookstore
The Professional Bookstore
BOOKS and SUPPLIES
FOR ALL COURSES
in the
HEALTH SCIENCES
including

BOTH THE Fourth Ave. Co-
op, 212 N. Fourth Ave., and the
People's Co-np, 722 Packard,
carry grains, dairy products and
yoghurt. Patrons are urged to
actively work for the co-ops and
are given slight discounts for
their efforts.
The Ann Arbor Itemized Co-
op is organized on quite a dif-
ferent system, however. There
is no central building where
members purchase their food
but rather a group of four or
five representatives that spend
the early morning hours each
Saturday morning haggling with
the dealers and farmers at De-
troit's Eastern Market.
The Itemized Co-op runs solely
through the constant combined
efforts of its members. It is
not a grocery store which works
for its patrons and pays its em-
oloyes, rather its members work
for it and each week's success-
ful purchase of fresh, inexpen-
sive fruit and vegetables is the
nay-off.
FOR THE purposes of the
Itemized Co-op, the city is di-
vided into numerousregions.
Each region has a communi-
cator who attends weekly cen-
tral meetings and handles most
central business.
After the weary buyers re-
turn from the market to ,etiver
the food to a central dividing
place, the process decentralizes
again. Each region sends mem-
bers to divide the food into the
regional orders, a trucker from
each region transfers the food
to a regional distribution house
where two or three baggers di-
vide the food into the individual
orders which each member or
household then picks up-thus
completing the cycle.
THE PERSON who does'most
of her or his shopping at the
Co-ops, saves nearly $15 per
month-a nice sum of money to
have as rents continue to spiral
in the city..
PLANNED
RET\

4

WWI
r
atom
F

MEDICAL-DENTAL
NURSING-PUBLIC HEALTH

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Sun(

912 N. Main St.

oo A

i

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ANN ARBOR
0 FREE PREGNANCY
IESTING
(same day diagnosis)
SCOTNFIDENTIAL

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