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September 18, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-18

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, September 18, 1975

ASKS IMPROVEMENT
SACUA hits CRISP

$5 room-switch feel
causes dorm dispute

(Continued from Page 1)

old one We'll go back to the old the problems facing incoming

(Continued from Page 1)

many hours there was some- one." 1students. dent transfers fron
thing drastically wrong." ' HE ADDED that he was "When they found sections dence hall to anoth
WHEN ASKED what prompt-- "very disappointed (w i t h closed they just didn't know getting on a waiting
ed the committee's action, CRISP this fall.) I think all of what to do," he said. "They desired hall, waiting
SACUA vice-chairman Brymer us were. I share the regret with needed some professional as-t de hl, iing
S UAvcchimnBymer to open up, filling out
Williams said, "Heavens, isn't the students who had to stand sistance. It just wasn't fair. termination form, inf
it obvious? The long delays, the in such long lines and I apolo- They were traumatized." two dormitories inv
lines. It doesn't work. I think gize to them." Johnson was careful to say, switch, and turning
we all hope it will not have to Members of SACUA said "The old system was a night- keys and meal card
be abandoned, but if it's not as their intention was to publicize mare, too. There ought to be
good as the old one, what would CRISP's problems and bring enough intellgence on this cam- IRONIC LY a
you do?" pressure upon Rhodes' office to pus that we can come up with Ing officials the $5
Imrv-h ytm The a better system." popular. Director
Rhodes said last night his of- improve thhe e system Tery kamp comments, "I
Tice has already formed a small stressed their desire to reform last spring (when t
comte famnsrtrCRISP rather than have it' JOHNSON and Rhodes ex-
committee of administrators, bderpressed their willingness to ap- first suggested). I'i
faculty, and registrars to re- abandoned. . peal to faculty, students and ad- proponent in the eas
view the system. Rhodes did "I tnin the administration is ministrators for help in solving ing rooms, but the ra
not comment on the effect of genuinely concerned about the problem. tee was fairly insis
the SACUA letter. streamlining the program," Associate University registrar Asked how muchr
Rhodes, whose office holds said Johnson. Harris Olson had not seen the charge will bringt
ultimate decision-making power H O W E V E R, Johnson SACUA letter as of last night versity's general f
over registration, said, "If it pointed out his deep disappoint- and declined comment. Asso- kamp replied, "W
isn't a better system than the ment with CRISP, emphasizing ciate Registrar Douglas Wool-
ley was not available.
Rhodes said, in defense of s
CRISP, "The potential gain isl dLL 1I
terrific. No university has de-
signed something like this on
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, anything like this scale. It's
easy to forget how successful it v
AND THE ARTS was during the summer and pre-1
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN registration. It really ran like (Continued from
a dream."

one resi-
er involves
list for the
for a space
t a contract
forming the
olved of the
g in one's
d.
mong Hous-
fee is un-
John Feld-
opposed it
he idea was
m a strong
se in chang-
ate commit-
tent on it."
revenue the,
to the Uni-
fund, Feld-
e're antici-

pating about 3,000 room
changes, so it should bring in
about $15,000."
Siding with Feldkamp is Hous-
ing Information Director John
Finn, who claims that the fee
will be "very difficult to imple-
ment" because a student can,
wrangle out of it for a variety
of reasons - a health disability,
a psychiatric disability or the
inability to pay additional
money.
The idea is especially odious
among some students. Bursley
Resident Adviser Steve Hibsh-
man, a senior in LSA, claims,
"Because of the dorm lottery
last spring, more people are
rooming blind this year, so
more people are dissatisfied
with their situations. To hit
these people with a $5 fee to
switch rooms is unfair."

'son attacks
as obscene'

Page 1)

The College of Literature, Science, and the Arts is
seeking candidates for the position of Dean. Students,
faculty, and staff are encouraged to submit nomina-
tions. Individuals with a strong commitment to teaching
and scholarship, and demonstrated potential for effec-
tive administrative leadership are desired.
Applications and nominations should be directed
to Professor Angus Campbell, Chairman, Search Com-
mittee, Institute for Social Research, University of
Michigan.
THE UNIVERSITY IS A NON-DISCRIMINATING
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER

A there's
thru
Classified

PATTERSON . didn't. stop,
however, and last Friday went
to seven judges before he found
one that would sign an order al-
lowing him to bust the theatre
again.'
He returned Saturday night
and repeated his performance'
which included carting off the'
projection equipment.
Finally, the owners got a
temporarytrestraining order I
against Patterson in U. S. Dis-
trict Court where a hearing on
the- whole mess is now under-
way.
THOSE proceedings began

a

I

HATHA YOGA
CLASSES
902 BALDWIN, ANN ARBOR
SIDDHA YOGA DHAM
Taught by GIRIJA
Studied hatha voga with Hari Doss in Hardwar, India,
arid spent five. years with Swami Muktananda Paroma-
hansa, during which time she taught hatha voga at his
ashram in Ganeshpuri, India.
t Classes held from 9-10:30 a.m. each Mon-
day, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday start-
ing Saturday, September 20.
ONE DAY A WEEK FOR 6 WEEKS: $20.00
(Evening class may be arranged)
0 BEGINNER'S COURSE.
This course will cover all basic postures, breathing exer-
cise with mantra and relaxation. This course will pre-
pare the body for meditation.
H Keld in a pure and beautiful Ashram envi-
ronment. Tapes, of chanting.
0 Call 994-5625 or visit our Ashram to register.

Tuesday with the judge chas-
tizing Patterson for conducting
"hit and run attacks" on the
theatre. Judge John Feikens
also reminded Patterson that
it's up to a jury - not the
county prosecutor's office -
to determine if Stranger is in-
deed obscene.
Still, Patterson has no doubt
that it is.
A fter viewing the film, in
the prescence of a judge, Pat-
terson says he found it sex-
ually explicit and "in .living
color with all the moans and
groans to go wit it." He went
on to compare it with the much
ballyhooed Deep Throat, say-
ing that Stranger was "worse."
"I'M NOT A moralist. I'm
not on my white horse, I leave
that to the ministers on Sun-
day," he adds.
But Jeffrey Faintuck, an at-
torney representing the Studio
North Theater management,
claims Patterson began the
busts after he determined "that
it was in his own best interests
to close down the theater and
to try to get as much publicity
as he could out of it."
Patterson disclaims any per-
sonal interest and contends he
only wants to preserve Fern-
dale- as a quiet community
that's free of adult book stores,
theaters, and massage parlors.
He adds that, based on mail
received by the prosecutor's
office, the entire community
stands behind him in that quest.

AP Photo

DUKE LAW SCHOOL
will interview interested students
Thursday, September 25
contact
Career Planning and Placement

J

L..... ..

I

a - - - - - _ _. _ _- - -

Patriotic poultry
In the true spirit of the bicentennial, Jason Loughmiller
poses with his turkey which he has outfitted in red, white
and blue bunting during the fourth annual Daviess County
Turkey Trot Festival in Montgomery, Ind. In addition to the
costume competition, four days of live turkey racing attracted
more than 35,000 to the small southwestern Indiana town.
P anel recommends
facuilypay hie
(Continued from Page 1) men faculty members are about
we will have to forego some of 15,600 less than that of men
these in the interest of main- faculty members.
taining the strength of the oth-
ers," Fleming said.
Also included in CESF's re-
port were:
-the "bringing to fruition" of Have a flair for
the annuity supplemental pro- artistic writing?
gram for University retirees, If you are interest-
where average payments will be ed in reviewiiW
$120.55 per month. or writingdfeature
-the average salary of Uni- stories a b ut the
versity full professors is $25,382; drama, dance, film
-the average salary of the as- arts: Contact Arts
yE d itoar, c/o The
sociate professor is $18,413; Michigan Daily.
-the average salary of the as-
sistant professor is $14,826; and
-the average salaries of wo-
Don't Let the University
Screw You Again
YOU TOO CAN LET IT FLY ON
THE FOLLOWING COMMITTEES:
" Student Organization Board
Acts as Liason for Students and U. Administration
" Research Policies
* U. Relations
*Academic Affairs
" Budget Priorities
" Permanent Interviewing Board
" Women's Inter-Collegiate Athletic Advisory
Committee
INTERVIEWS WILL BE HELD
MONDAY & TUESDAY, SEPT. 22 & 23
Drop by SGC Offices on the Third Floor-Michigan
Union to sign up for an interview and pick up appli-
cation forms.

I
,Angerec
Bursley
residents
ather
By LOIS JOSIMOVICH
Bursley Hall residents last
night held protest meetings on
two unrelated issues - the dor-
mitory's latest sack lunch pol-
icy and reduced night bus serv-
ice to the North Campus area.
Although attendance at both
meetings was sparse, Bursley
Resident Advisor Steve Hibsh-
man, coordinator of the meet-
ings, claimed he had heard "a
lot of complaints" in both areas.
CO MP L AINTS over sack
lunches centered on what Hibsh-
man termed a "drastic ,cut" in
the amount of food available for
students whose tight academic
schedules do not allow time for
a trip to the dorm for their noon
meals.
"I'm not saying we should
have unlimited food," said one
resident, "but it doesn't seem
fair that we can't have as much
as the people who eat the regu-
lar mealswhen we're paying
the same amount."
Of the hundred-odd people
who take advantage of sack
lunches at Bursley, most say
they are not able to transfer to
another dorm to eat. And budget
cuts at the University Food
Service have made their lives
a little more difficult.
ALTHOUGH students last year
were allowed to take - large
quantities of fruit, drinks, and
dessert for their lunches, rising
costs in soft drinks, yogurt, and
cold-cuts have limited the choice
to two sandwiches or a yogurt,
either milk or a fruit drink, po-
tato chips, and either one fruit
or one dessert.
Hibshman,sin answer to the
residents' complaints, intends to
ask thetCost Reduction Commit-
tee, set up last spring to find,
ways of cutting costs in the face
of the University's six per cent
budget cut, to reconvene in the
near future.
IN REGARD to the transpor-
tation question, most people
agreed that daytime commuter
s-rvice has improved despite
an 89 per cent turnover in bus
drivers this fall.
However, students claim there
is much over-crowding due to
the newly-opened Art and Archi-
tecture School on North Cam-
pus, and the University isn't
compensating with more bus
service.
Instead, the last bus from
central campus to Bursley and
Baites leaves an hour and a
half earlier than last year at
12:15 a.m., and an hour later
on weekends. After 10 p'.m. serv-
ice drops to a bus run every 40
minutes, making things very un-
comfortable for the late-night
studier or party-goer who
misses a bus and must walk or
hitch-hike several miles back to
Bursley.
SHORT or LONG
HAIRSTYLES TO PLEASE
DASCOLA
STYLISTS
ARBORLAND-971-9975
MAPLE VILLAGE-761-2733
E. LIBERTY-668-9329
E. UNIVERSITY-662-0354

E
(orduroy Overalls
AND I
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tJ " MAC."
La ORM 0 /'/Pk A il

I

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CLONLARA offers
CHILD CARE
for all Football Saturdays
3-YEAR-OLDS through 11-YEAR-OLDS
Children in age groups with activities
geared to their interest level.
$3.75 PER CHILD-
reduced fees for each additional child in family
FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 769-4511
and make your reservation before 3 p.m. on day pre-
cedinq the qame.

1

TODAY 3 p.m. & 7 p.m.
Free Instructions
Pocket Billiards
Our instructor is
a nice guy, too.
Michigan Union

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Wet WhIy Wot'?,
Sorority Rush Info.
663-4505 am's
Mass Meeting 7:30pm

In the time it takes to drive responsible for killing young people- -- - ----- Y-
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