100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 18, 1975 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

S
Thursday, September 18, 1975

THE MiCHsvAN DAILY

Page Three

Thursday, September 18, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

...

Damage heavy
in hirricane

British judge gives no go
to young girl's sterilization

From Wire Service Reports
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico -
Hurricane Eloise slammed tor-
rential rain and winds of up to
80 miles an hour on the Domini-
can Republic yesterday after
wreaking widespread death and
destruction in Puerto Rico on
Tuesday.
Initial reports from the Do-
minican Report yesterday said
rain and screaming winds were
battering the north coast. There
were no immediate reports of
casualties or damage, although
officials said they expected dam-
age in the lush Cibao agricul-
ture area to be in the millions
of dollars.
PUERTO RICAN civil defense
authorities counted at least 25
dead, most victims of drowning
or electrocution. Fifty persons
were reported injured and dam-
age was estimated between $40
and $50 million by authorities.
Officials in Puerto Rico said
21 towns were without commun-
ication, six without electricity,
and 14 without drinking water.
Heaviest rainfall was in the
island's central and southern re-
gions where ten inches of rain
had fallen since Saturday.
Weather reports expect more
rain the next few days, although
the worst of the storm is over.
DESPITE reports of receding
flood waters, some 5,500 per-
sons, mostly from the mountain-
ous interior, are still homeless-
housed in schools, churches, and
public buildings after a massive
rescue effort conducted by po-
lice, Red Cross, and other re-
lief workers.
San Juan, on the north coast,

escaped serious damage. But
police said most government
offices, businesses and all
schools were closed.
Col. Antonio V. Munera, the
deputy Civil Defense director of
Puerto Rico, said the death toll
and damage were the highest
of any of the 16tropical storms
that have hit the nation in the
past decade.
THE PUERTO Rican gover-
nor, Rafael Hernandez Colon
was flying back from Washing-
ton for a survey of the damage
and said he would seek federal
aid.
The storm, about 125 miles e
long and 50 miles wide, was ex-s
pected by the National Hurri-
cane Center in Miami to bring
heavy rains and floods to Haiti
and Cuba. A hurricane alert was
also issued for the Bahamas.
Dominican Republic author-
ities fear a high loss of life. All
communications between Santo
Domingo, on the south coast,
and the northeast coast were
cut off. The state electric com-
pany cut all power on the is-
land of four million because of
numerous fallen wires and the
danger of electrocution. Tele-
phone service was sporadic.
In Santo Domingo, police and
Civil Defense workers evacuat-
ed low lying suburbs and areas
along river banks. Waves were
breaking along the palm-lined
coast road from the airport into!
the city.
In Haiti, Red Cross Director
Dr. Victor Larouche said he was
especially concerned about what
Eloise might do to the country's
northwest, which is suffering
from prolonged drought.

LONDON (P) - An English
judge yesterday ordered doctors
not to sterilize an 11-year-old
girl they say is mentally back-
ward, declaring that it would de-
prive her of the basic right of a
woman to reproduce. The doc-
tors felt the operation was nec-
essary because the girl was
mentally backward while her
"physical development had ad-
vanced at an exceptional rate,"
according to Judge Rose Heil-
bron.
The girl's mother, a 51-year-'
old widow and cleaning woman
with two other children, had
consented to the operation. But
an educational psychologist,
Margaret Dubberley, who works
at a special school attended by
the girl, brought legal proceed-
ings to stop it.
The girl never has been
named and Judge Heilbron or-
dered that no hint be given of
her identity.
At the end of a five-day pri-
vate hearing in high court,
Judge Heilbron said she was an-
nouncing her decision in open
court because of the controver-
sy the case has provoked over
whether English law adequately
protects the rights of children.
SHE SAID the operation was
''neither medically indicated nor
necessary, and it would not be in
the girl's best interests for it to
be performed." The girl's be-
havioral condition had im-

proved, and the operation would'
"deprive her of a basic human
right - that of a woman to re-
produce," Judge Heilbron said.
The judge praised the "cour-
age, persistence and humane
concern for this young, girl"'
shown by Dubberley and her
colleagues and described the
girl's mother as "excellent, car-
ing and devoted." The mother
had "courageously faced vari-
ous problems over her daugh-
ter" and had consented to the
operation on medical advice, the
judge said.
Doctors said the girl suffers
from a rare condition, "Soto's
Syndrome," which results in
large bone growth, behavioral
problems and often some degree
of mental retardation. However,
Dubberley had said she did not
consider the girl retarded,
though she is somewhat clumsy
and of below-average intelli-
gence.
The operation was originally
proposed by Dr. Ronald Gordon.
He said it seemed sensible to
prevent having babies persons
who could not look after them,
and the benefit to the commun-
ity in reducing congenital ab-
normalities was obvious.
THE CASE HAS similar par-
alels to one in the United States
two years ago. The U.S. Office

of Economic Opportunity re-
ported two years ago that 11
minors may have been involun-
I tarily sterilized by a federally
funded birth control clinic in
Montgomery, Ala., after an in-
vestigation prompted by a law-
suit filed on behalf of two ster-
ilized girls.
There was no indication that
mental retardation was involved
in those cases, but a U.S. fed-
eral judge issued guidelines ear-
ly last year prohibiting the ster-
ilzation of any institutionalized
mental patient in Alabama un-
der 21 year old except in cases
of "medical necessity." Earlier,
a three-judge federal panel had
declared unconstitutional an
Alabama law which provided for
the sterilization of residents of
mental institutions.
NEXT WEEK
ot the UNION
THURS.-4&8 p.m.
Jim Rempe
POCKET BILLIARD
EXHIBITION
FREE

AP Photo
Those were the good old days?
With autumn's chill around the corner, a sea lion takes a last lingering look at the sun and
rehashes old memories from the stern of a sailboat anchored In Washington's Puget Sound.

I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 13
Thursday, September 18, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 964-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a ii y Tuesday througn
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Anp

Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 ocal mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states,and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.50 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
:..... . ... *. r. ..1... {?":........
Thursday, September 18 A. Nisbet, Columbia U., Prophecy,
Day Calendar Hopes, and Fears: Alexis de Tocque-
a Hess, chief writer, le's Assessment of American So-
1960 & 1964 Republican platforms, ge in, 4 pm.A
"Building a People-Controlled Com- tr. Japanese Studies/Film Co-op:
munity," :0a.OusTeEdo umr ak
IWY/Friends of Museum of Art: hamA , E-10 mummer,pRamk-
Valerie Baas, "The Craft of Making Women's Studies Films: It Hap-
an Etching;" tour of K. Kollewitz s ;i-st; apy
exhibit, Pendleton Ctr., Union, pens to Us; M. Trsrtate; Betty
noon.Tells Her Story; No Tears for Ra-
Ctr. Japanese Studies: M. R. Pe- chef, Lee. Rm. 1, MLB, 9 pm.
attie, Penn State, "Japanese Liter-
ature 1920-1933 Dealing with the
Strategic Aspects of a Possible-US- CHARI NG CROSS
Japan War," Commons Rm., Lane BOOKSHOP
Hall, noon.
Medical Ctr. Commission for Wo- Used, Fine and Scholarly Books
men: 4554 Kresge I, noon. 316 S. STATE-994-4041
Regents Meeting: Regents' Rm., Open Mon.-Fri. 10-8,
2:30 pm; public comments, 3:30 pm. Sat. 10-6
Bicentennial Lecture Series: R.
s 'U

gar

WHY WALK FARTHER !
LEVI'S BRAND
Available at
Wild's Varsity Shop

FEATURING:
" Denim Bells
" Brush Denims
" Corduroys

THE DAILYI
make
interesting
reading

/

For
Bargain
Hunters

" Panatella 0 Work Shirts
Knit Slaks " Flannel Shirts
" Boot Jeans
" Pre-Wash Sloks 0 Denim Jackets

Wild's Varsity Shop
311 S. STATE STREET
a o~- - --w, - - - - w

I

CLASSIFIEDS

TO BE
TO BE BLACK
TO BE BLACK AND LONELY
TO BE BLACK AND SEARCHING
FOR YOURSELF
Small group discussions dealing with the
interpersonal relationships of undergraduate
Black brothers and sisters
Our objectives are to examine Black sexuality with open-
ness and honesty. Focus on feelings, values, beliefs, atti-
tudes, experiences, more than on information. Exploration
and sharing about attitudes and behavior will be encour-
"qed.
8 weekly sessions on Thursday evenings ---
Limited to 6 men and 6 women --
- Includes an all-day workshop in November -
Call JANIE BOWENS (764-7442) THIS WEEK for more
information or for a reservation. First come, first served.
A brief interview may be required.
Sponsored by the Office of Ethics and Religion
Student Services, Third floor of the Michigan Union.

I

BENEFIT'

HOMECOMING.
MASS MEETING
TOMORROW NIGHT,
THURSDAY, SEPT. 18, AT 7:00 P.M.
IN SPECIAL EVENTS OFFICE OF UAC
2nd FLOOR, UNION

9i

Authentic Dinner
from Senecal, W. Africa
Minimum Contribution $1.75

s "

All proceeds will go toward
"Sahel Drought Relief"
at GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
Friday, Sept. 16 at 6 p.m.
For Reservations; call 662-5189

- EVENTS -

"
S

DIAG DOG CONTEST
AMATEUR PHOTO-
GRAPHY CONTEST

FRISBEE CONTEST

" BEER CHUGGING
CONTEST
" PARADE!
" DANCE-
" TRICYCLE RACE
" BED ROLLING CONTEST
" EGG TOSS
" MAGAZINE

Ours b k
are inVfU0

0
"

BEER CHUGGING
FRISBEE CONTEST
CONTEST

t
JF.
'v
6:.
y"rc:

or CALL RICHARD SHERRY-763-1107

A

i1

L

J

f

014024 rr

OF LY
a rcLgiot5 ar~ sriej of orna utuareven{ 3
C. G. JUNG
"THE STORY OF CARL JUNG"
PART 1-In Search of the Soul
PART 2-67,000 Dreams
PART 3-The Mystery that Heals
A FILMED DOCUMENTARY ON
JUNG'S LIFE AND WORK
WILL BE SHOWN:
Friday, September 19
8:00 p.m.

i
i
i
I
i
I
f
F
I
i
i
E

ADEUMO

Bask to the Gel--ar.

Add these words to your basic vocabulary
now, whether or not 'you're planning a trip
to Mexico soon.

SPANISH
chocho
gargarizando
sacamuelas
bulla
manteca
pantufla

ENGLISH
childish old man
gargling
quack dentist
soft coal
lard

bedroom slippe

Here at Jose Cuervo, we believe
an informed consumer is an
informed consumer.

v L },::
{
1 """, ""
;::{ i
S

A_

S
A

V S

L...

cl

.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan