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September 17, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-17

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Pae Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, September 17, 1975

Intramurals face space age

By ENID GOLDMAN .I
After far too many years of
battling the crowds at the an-
tiquated IM building on Hoov-
er Street, students and faculty
will soon be able to pursue their
recreational, intramural, and
club sport interests in two new,
spacious facilities.
The new IM structures, which
will be ready for use by Sep-
tember 1, 1976, are the only
ones to be built since 1928,
when the University of Michi-
gan dedicated the Hoover
Street edifice as the first intra-
mural building in the country.
WITH THE ADDITION of the
two facilities, now nearing com-
pletion behind Bursley-Baits on
North Campus, and on Central
Campus in the Hill area, the
University of Michigan will
once again have more indoor
recreational space than any
campus in the United States.
"For a few years, until Ohio

SHOWN HERE IS THE NEW Intramural Sports building on North Campus. This facility, as
well as the one being built on Central Campus, will be ready for use by Fall, 1976. The two
buildings make Michigan the leading school in the country in providing indoor recreation for
its students. To help pay for the new facilities, students will be assessed a fee of $10.

State completes its multi-mil-
lion dollar structures, there
won't be anyone in the country
who can match our facilities
area-wise," confirmed Dr. Mi-,
chael Stevenson, Associate Di-
rector of recreational, intra-
mural and club sports.
Students will be assessed a
fee of $10 to help pay for the
new constructions, which will
resemble the Hoover Street IM
building in basic lay-out.
THE CENTRAL CAMPUS
building will feature a multi-
purpose gym floor - lined to
accommodate nine badminton
courts, four basketball courts,
four tennis courts and six vol-
leyball courts.
Nine handball / paddleball
courts and three squash courts
have also been constructed with
space available for two addi-
tional handball / paddleball
courts and three squash courts
if funding can be arranged.
A one-eighth mile track, men
and women's locker rooms, a
first aid room, a martial arts
room, offices and physical edu-
cation classrooms, comprise the
rest of the building.
Swimmers will continue to
utilize adjacent 21 - year - old
Margaret Bell Pool.
In all, the new facility will be
slightly larger than the Hoover
Street construction.
THE TOTAL PROJECTED
cost of the Central Campus and
North Campus IM buildings is
about $8 million. Most of the $3
million allotted for the North
Campus building, however, will
go towards the construction of
an indoor pool with outdoor sun-
deck/patio.
The North Campus building
will be about two-thirds the size
of the Central Campus build-
ing, and willralso include abgym
marked off for three badminton

courts, two and one-half bas- ering to married students and mural
ketball courts, one tennis court faculty; and "special event" to hold
and three volleyball courts. type of activities such as all the ne
There will also be five hand- night mixers ,trivia bowls, con- studen
ball / paddleball courts, two certs and card games. whena
squash courts, one-eighth mile "Depending on student inter- dentsr
track, a weight room, an exer- est and need we'll see what di- sits w
cise room, equipment room, rection to take," Dr. Stevenson and th
first aid room, conference emphasized. increa
room, offices, and men and wo- Though a committee of stu- better
men's locker rooms. dents, faculty, and administra- would
Both buildings are not only tors concurred on plans for they c
intended to alleviate overcrowd- the new buildings, the student to ass
ed conditions but also to create body at large was not asked for the
space needed for developing its opinion of the proposed con- The
new programs. struction. in Aug
"With these three facilities, "I haven't heard anyone com- as par
plus the Coliseum (on Fifth and plain about it," Dr. Stevenson cluded
Hill), we hope to encompass stated. "The total recreation from t
more of the student community program has increased 74 per House
in recreational activity," stated cent in the last five years." the Ti
Dr. Stevenson.
"Right now competitive intra- IN 1969 THE Advisory Com- to cop
mural sports, sports clubs and mittee on Recreation, Intra- Yost's
informal recreation claim all
scheduled time in the IM build-
ing. In addition to continuing
the same programs we are now
planning to add to this list of Jjfijm
indoor irtivities."
n DR. STEVENSON FORSEES 1

and Club sports decided
A off the final plans for
ew IM buildings due to
t, protest. At that time,
a reaction was sought stu-
argued that the Univer-
was suffering financially
e money gained from an
se in fees could be put to
use. Since everyone
not use these facilities,
laimed, it would be unfair
sess all students equally
eir construction.
buildings which surfaced
gust, 1974, were conceived
rt of a package which in-
moving the ice arena
the Coliseum to Yost Field
and the construction of
rack and Tennis Building,
mpensate for the loss of
facilities.

mm

" """""""'"

zi~ion

The College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts
and
the Bicentennial Committee of
the University of Michigan
cordially invite the public to a
Bicentennial Lecture by
ROBERT A. NISBET
S AlbertSchweitzer Professor of Socioloqy at Columbia University
PROPHECY, HOPES, AND FEARS
ALEXIS DE TOCQUEVILLE'S ASSESSMENT OF
A AMERICAN SOCIETY IN RETROSPECT
AUDITORIUM A, ANGELL HALL
4:15.pm.-TH URSDAY, Sept. 18
4:15 p~m.-T_ _p_'

Gri~dde Picks

C

family oriented recreation cat- By TOM CAMERON
The intramural department is filled with busy dates this
S The Top 20 week, and all divisions of the program hav entries due within
the next two weeks.

a

Bring your Griddes over to the Daily (420 Maynard) by mid-
night Friday to win this week's prize, a free pizza from Pizza

By The Associated Press
1. Oklahoma (53) 1-0-0

Bob's.
1. Stanford at MICHIGAN
(pick score)
2. Missouri at Illinois
3. Indiana at Nebraska
4. Penn State at Ohio State
S. Iowa at Syracuse
6. MiamiĀ°(0) at Mich. State
7. Northern Illinois at
Northwestern
8. Notre Dame at Purdue
9. Western Mich. at Minnesota

lmm gomlk

I

104 WASHERS
& DRYE R%
NO WAITING!~

10. S. Dakota at Wisconsin
11. Clemson at Alabama
12. Auburn at Baylor
13. Boston College at Temple,
14. Oklahoma at Pittsburgh
15. Bucknell at Rutgers
16. Texas A&M at LSU
17. Florida at N.C. State
18. Toledo at Villanova
19. Maryland at N. Carolina
20. DAILY LIBELS at Milford
High
Saturday
Child Core
WANT TO study or
shop or take the day
off every Saturday?
Call CLONLARA
THE fun place for kids
769-4511
Child care offered
each Saturday from
9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Ages from 2 to 11 years
CALL NOW FOR MORE
INFORMATION...

2. MICHIGAN (2)
3. Ohio State (2)
4. southern California
5. Missouri
6. Nebraska
7. Penn State
8. Texas
9. Notre Dame
10. Tennessee
11. Texas A&M
12. UCLA
13. Florida
Daily Libels (tie)
14. Alabama
15. Pitt
16. Arkansas
17. Arizona
18. Arizona State
19. Miami, 0.
20. West Virginia

1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
2-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
0-1-0
1-0-0
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0-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0
1-0-0.

1,139 For those interested in golf, entries are due Friday, Sept. 26,
931 in the All-Campus, Independent, and Residence Hall divisions.
922 Golf entries for the Faculty, Fraternity and Graduate divisions
632 are due on Friday, Oct. 3.
478
For women golfers, the intramural department is offering
427 competition for those with entries in by Sunday, Sept. 28.
Touch football will come to Michigan along with October.
272 Entries should be in at the intramural department for the
217 Fraternity and Women's divisions on October 1, Graduate and
205 Independent on Oct. 2, and Faculty on Oct. 3.
109 The ever-popular Co-recreational touch football league has
64 entries due on Sept. 28.
56 September 24 is the day for badminton singles entries in the
42 Women's division, while the Residence Halls have until Sept. 26
29 to get the track entries in.
Squash will start on Oct. 1 in the All-Campus division, and
graduate bowlers should have entries in by Sept. 30.
The program is still in need of touch football officials for
this season. This year there will be three instead of two officials
per game, and the increase has created a need for more officials.
For those interested, there will be a meeting on Tuesday, Sep-
tember 30, at 7:30 p.m. in the Sports Coliseum.

OPEN 24 HOURS EVERY DAYs
SPECIAL-Every Tuesday & Friday

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WASHERS
COIN LAUNDRY
MR. STADIUM & DRY CLEANING
668-7928
1958 5. Industrial Hwy. (Next to Colonial Lanes)

FRITZ LANG'S 1926
METROPOLIS
(AT 7)
This futurist study of revolt amonq the workers in a utopian
city is also a famous German Expressionist silent.
ELlA KAZAN'S 1957
A FACE IN THE CROWD
(AT 9.05)
Andy Griffin, Patricia Neal, Walter Matthau and Lee
Remick star in this study of a country singer who be-
comes a political demagoque. By the people who made
ON THE WATERFRONT.
CINEMA GUILD both shows OLD ARCH.
or$2.00 AUD.

I

2

FI

DUKE LAW SCHOOL
will interview interested students
Thursday, September 25
contact
Career Planning and Placement

s_ r

;w-

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