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September 14, 1975 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

. Qge Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September 14, 1975

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

%% -'M' DEFENSE TOUGH:
SGC Needs Students)s
* U-Cellar Board of Direc-as
tors has two openings for
graduate students. ( (Continued from Page 1)ex the end zone for Michigan's first third period the Wolverines set off
in the first period after an ex touchdown of the 1975 season. up Wood's third straight field in
University Council has change of punts. The conversion by Bob Wood goal giving Michigan a 13-6 lead1bu
two student openings. BELL TOOK a pitch from made the score 7-3 in favor of with 7:16 left in the third per- sMI
Leach and romped around left the Wolverines. iod. ig
INTERVIEWS for these committees will be end for 14 yards and a Michigan FROM THIS t Michigan failed to move the W
held Tues. and Wed. nights, Sept. 16 & 17. st own all Maize and e as the da
took the following handoff on a alMieadBlea h e punts and with 2:19 left in thea
Need more information? Stop by SGC Offices, counter play for 11 yards and fense kept gaining tigh con- third quarter Michigan punter oth
third floor of the Union; sign up for an inter- another Michigan first down. trol of Wisconsin's running Anderson stood behind center sai
-ea piu- npiaoIOn the first play of the second gakeand the Michigan offense Jim Czirr to punt for his sec- A
view and pick up an application. quarter fullback Rob Lytle rip - back the Badger defense and and final time of the game.
ped through a gaping hole onbk Anderson kicked a low line do
the left side, and waltzed into Leach, however, threw a drive 48 yards to deep man ute
- - costly interception later in the Mike Morgan who caught it in ga
quarter, into the hands of Wis- full stride. Before Michigan de- pl
- - _ I consin buck-back Steve Wagner fenders knew what had hap-
giving the Badgers the a on pened Morgan raced 56 yards an
THE IMichigan's 27 yard line. to the Wolverine 13 yard line.ya
Five days later Wisconsin Scott Corbin saved a touchdown yS
awwwn n.kicker Lamia made the score by nailing Morgan from behind. ,Q

I. U

cold
f to the one and only Marek
a line plunge up the middle
t the Wisconsin star ran
nack into the arms of Mich-
an linebacker O'Neal and the
sconsin attack was dead.
'I just felt we had to go for
TD then," Jardine said. "An-
her field goal and we would
ll be behind."
AFTER AN interception but
wn by 7 points with 13 min-
es remaining Wisconsin be-
n to force the play and five
ays later Michigan defensive
captain Don Dufek picked off
hastily thrown Kopina pass
d returned the ball to the 21
Od line of Wisconsin.
Seven plays later Wood made
e score 16-6 when he connect-
for his third field goal in
many attempts.
Michigan completed the scor-
later in the period on a
ven-yard touchdown pass to
ll. Woodconverted to make
escore 23-6.

ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER

0 a place to meet persons from many countries
and'to discuss global issues and personal questions
* TUESDAYS-Lunch-Discussions
with international perspective-held weekly at the
INTERNATIONAL CENTER, 603 E. Madison Street
beginning September 16. Cost 50c.
* THURSDAYS--Lunch-Seminars at the Ecumenical Center
during October. Cost $1.00.
* INTERNATIONAL RESIDENCE for foreign and American students
(a few openings are avaialble for the Winter Term, 1976)
" HOME VISITS for foreign studehts and scholars with
American families in and around Michigan.
0 COUNSELING SERVICES particularly with reference to intercultural,
interfaith matters, including premarital and marital counseling.
M SEMINAR AND CONFERENCE PLANNING for student and
community groups on values and ethics in national and
international issues.
All Interested Persons Are Welcome to Participate
Stop By for Coffee and Get Acquainted!

7-6 in favor of Michigan with
4:51 remaining in the first
half.
After receiving the ensuing
kickoff, the Wolverines cranked
up their offense again and sev-
en plays later found themselves
sitting on Wisconsin's 20 yard
line with 1:38 remaining in the
first half. Michigan drove to
the five yard line where Wood
kicked his second field goal of
the game giving Michigan a 10-
6 lead at the half.
AFTER a drive early in the

HOWEVER, a magnificent
defensive stand by the Wolver-
ines forced Wisconsin into a
fourth and four situation on
Michigan's six yard line.
Quarterback Kopina handed

the
ed
as
ing
sev
Be
the

Wihy not join the DAILY? .
THE DAILY IS A GREAT PLACE TO:

'I

"
0
"
"1

meet other good people
drink 5c Cokes
learn the operations of a newspaper
write stories
see your name in print
earn a little money

Even if
v it Hurts
Nm mw- L eba H e rt z
Michigan defenders...
.'wewere ready'
jJEFENSE IS THE NAME of the game, and yesterday Bo
Schembechler's defensive squad exhibited mid-season form in
holding the nowerful Wisconsin offense to only six points.
The mighty Blue defense, remembering last year's 287 yards
that they surrendered to the Badgers, were ready to nlay.
"We played real well," said co-captain Don Dufek, who in-
tercented a key pass n the fourth quarter.
"Basically, it was a whole team effort." said middle
guard Tim Davis. "Last year, you know what happened - we
got ripped. This year we were ready.
"Last year, emotionally and hvsically T got beat. This year
I planned not to get beat. We played a helluva game."
Offensive mistakes didn't make things any easier for the
Wolverine defense. The defense had its work cut out for it when
five bad turnovers put the Badgers in Michigan territory.
The only scores Wisconsin could muster with those breaks
were two field goals. And in view of the potentially powerful of-
fense the Badgers boast, the defense can be very proud of its play.
"We gave our defense horrendous field position," said
Schembechler, "With three interceptions, one fumble, and a
tremendous punt return, you need a super defense to stop
a team like Wisconsin.
"Our defense can't stand that pressure the rest of the sea-
son, Hopefully, the offense will stop the mistakes."
On the second play of the game, Michigan found itself in a
deep hole as tailback Gordon Bell fumbled and Wisconsin re-
covered at the Blue 32.
All-America candidate Bill Marek seemed to be living up to
his reputation as he garnered 19 yards' and ran for two first
downs in only five carries. But then the defense tightened and
forced Badger coach John Jardine to send in Vince Lamia to
kick a field goal.,
The defense halted the Wisconsin offense on the next two
Badger possessions.
But then an intercepted pass off freshman quarterback Rick
Leach placed the pressure back on the defense. Wisconsin moved
to the 17, but again was forced to kick a field goal.
The greatest task for the Michigan defense was yet to
come. In the third quarter, with the score 13-6, Badger Mike
Morgan ran back a John Anderson punt to the Michigan 13.
A touchdown, and Wisconsin ties the score.
But on a fourth and four situation at the six, linebacker Cal-
vin O'Neal stopped Marek dead, and Michigan"s offensive er-
rors were again overcome.
In Marek's last three games in 1974, he rushed for over 200
yards each game. Yesterday, the Wolverines held the runner to
a mere 58 yards.
O'Neal commented: "Last year, we never hit him. This year,
we were ready. All we talked about was cutbacks. I slowed a
little slower so when Marek cut back, I was ready."
"We tackled him high and drove him back," added Davis.
"You have to hit like any other runner."
The score that put the game out of reach for Wisconsin was
set up by another defensive play. Dufek's interception put a
final dent in the floundering Badger attack.
"I think the quarterback misread the play," said Dufek.
"I broke and I think he was going for the wingback. He
misread me, and I became the wngback."
"The defense was superb," said Schembechler. "We played
two of the better offenses in our last two games (Wisconsin and
Ohio State) and no touchdowns were allowed."
The last touchdown scored against Michigan was a punt re-
turn by Illinois' Mike Gow in the ninth game of the 1974 season.
On the dearth of touchdowns allowed by the Michigan defense,
Davis simply says, "We plan to keep it that way the rest of
the way."
Another opening, another win

UM FOLKLORE SOCIETY
Get-Acquainted
Meeting
Thurs., Sept. 16th
8 p.M.
Pendleton Arts
Center
2nd Floor
MICHIGAN UNION

Come on down to 420 Maynard anytime and
join the business, news, sports or photography
staffs!
---

I

i
I
i

r.........
...
E
t
IF
M

1111I

III

921 Church Street

662-5529

PUBLIC INVITED
Picking, Singing,
and Good Listening

SINGLE SHOW SALES BEGIN MONDAY!

2

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Pfofes sional

Feate

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PRESENTS

IN T H E
POWER CENTER

classroom instruction in
electronic music
the music
studiO
If you want to create electronic music, our
12-week course is meant for you. Learn how to
use a synthesizer, operate tape recorders and
m i x e r s professionally, choose equipment
appropriate to your needs, and much more.
Classes are small and individual attention is
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MICH wISC

555 e. william

994-5404

First Downs 20
Rushing (att/yds) 62-394
Passing (att/com/int) 10-2-3
Passing Yards 34
Fumbles (no./lost) 3/1
Penalties (no./yds.) 2/25
Punting (no./avg.) 2-49

hol. - -Iq

CLASSES BEGIN THIRD WEEK OF SEPTEMBER

8
42- 98 Lytle
9-4-2 Leach
38 Bell
J. Smith
3 Corbin
6-43.2 Huckleby
R. Smith

PAT
CARROLL
IN
A MUSICAL SPOOF FOR
MYSTERY LOVERS
September 19, 20, 2
Al; Eerigs: 8pm
Suncay Man 3

< ,.
:: <!
:--:<: >
_

s "THREE COINS
"CALL ME IF
"HIGi-
and rr
1 (CA
SIn
wiAt th

>I
R
H
n
5
, .
'E.

C1
"AGREAT DELIGHT. . .TAP**
DANCING, CHORUS LINES,
PUNCH LINES AND
PRATFALLS" - C.B.S.
IN THE FOUNTAIN"
RESPONSIBLE"
HOPES" *
any more *
)00y%0A .#
November 7, 8, 9
All Evenings: 8pm,
u s Sunday Matinee: 3pm

ANTHONY ASQUITH'S 1938
PYGMLION
George Bernard Shaw's play made into a film with Shaw adding 14 new
scenes and winning an Academy Award for his contributions. Unavail-
able until recently because of legal complications involving the musical
version (MY FAIR LADY), PYGMALION remains more Shaw's than
Hollywood's. With Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller.
TUES.: Fritz Lang's METROPOLIS (at 7)
George Cukor's IT SHOULD HAPPEN TO YOU (at 9:05)z
TONIGHT at OLD ARCH. AUD.
CINEMA GUILD 7:00&9:05 Adm. only $1.25
JAZZ NIGHT
FEATURING A LIVE PERFORMANCE FROM
MIXED BAG
(7-8:30)c
PLUS A DOUBLE JAZZ FEATURE
BERT STEIN'S 1960n
JAZZ ON A SUMMER'S DAY
As an impressionistic view of the 1959 Newport Jazz Festival, this beautiful color film
shows not only the performers but the crowds and scenery that made Newport what it
was. The sound track is a iazz buff's delight. "One of the most exciting jazz concerts
ever recorded . . . a witty and perceptive document"-Judith Crist. Features: Thelo-
nous Monk, Sonny Stitt, Louis Armstrong, Chuck Berry, Jerry Mulligan. At 8:30
AT 8:30
MICHAEL CURTIZ' 1950
YOUNG MAN WITH A-HORN
The Bix Beiderbecke story with Kirk Douqlas as trumpet player Rick Martin, Lauren
Bacall as the neurotic wife and Doris Day as a happy, briqht-eyed vocalist who pulls

Marek
Starch
Kopina
Morgan
Pollard
Leach
Kopina
Carroll
Starch
Pollard
Smith
Bell

RUSHING
MICHIGAN
att yds avg
15 91 6.1
8 30 3.8
28 210 7.5
4 28 7.0
5 23 4.6
1 6 6.0
1 6 6.0
WISCONSIN
att yds avg
21 58 2.8
11 27 2.5
7 14 2.0
2 2 1.0
1 -3 -3.0
PASSING
MICHIGAN
att comp mt yds
10 2 3 34
WISCONSIN
7 3 1 27
2 1 1 11
RECEIVING
WISCONSIN
no yds
2. 17
2 21
MICHIGAN

/"

1®(*)A

W1
JASON ROBARDSM
IN
Eugene O'Neill's
LONG DAYS JOURN EY
T AT'7 TNT1f_U

AND
rII)Ic

j

Feb. 27 - 29
or April 16-18

.

EPT 2 6 27 & 28 n4
:nay Mainee,:3 prr

SCORES
MICHIGAN 23, Wisconsin 0
Ohio State 21, Michigan State 0
Illinois 27, Iowa 12
Indiana 20, Minnesota 14
Northwestern 31, Purdue, 25
Oklahoma 62, Oregon 7
Nebraska 10, LSU 7
Tennessee 26, Maryland 8
Colorado 34, California. 27
Penn State 34, Stanford 14
Tulane 17, Clemson 13
Florida 40, SMU 14
Kentucky 27, Virginia Tech 8
East Stroudsburg 7, Slippery Rock 0
Memphis State 31, Auburn 20
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Baltimore 8, Detroit 0
Milwaukee 9-3, Boston 6-6
Cleveland 7-3, New York 1-4
California 6, Kansas City 2
Oakland 8, Minnesota 5
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Montreal 5, Pittsburgh 2
New York 6, St. Louis 2
Chicago 4, Philadelphia 1
S-an Francisco 9, Cincinnati2
Cellist
(viola, double bass,
bassoon, trombone,
percussion)
OPEN INGS
illlur" IT

- IC&

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