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September 12, 1975 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-12

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Criday, September 12, 1975
Vets

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage Nrne

lead

Badger
By RICK BONINO
The offense sells the tickets, goes the old
gridiron adage, and the defense wins the ball-
games.
The fans in Madison this week proved the
first part of that all-too-often quoted saying.
The University of Wisconsin somehow ran out
of student football tickets for Saturday's home
opener with Michigan before it ran out of stu-
dents.
This unprecedented ducat demand is largely
due to the fine Badger offense, which ranked
second only to awesome Ohio State in confer-
ence scoring and total yardage last season.
WISCONSIN'S ATTACK, although sound, ap-
pears quite predictable-Marek, Marek and
more Marek. Balding Badger Billy, who ranked
first in Big Ten rushing last season and third
in the nation, heads a ground crew that returns
last year's top five rushers.
Marek, a good bet for Wisconsin's first All-
American since 1962, has also been touted as a
possible Heisman Trophy winner. If he can re-
peat last season's performance-1224 yards at
5.9 per crack while pacing the nation in scor-
ing--he should at least be in the running.
HOWEVER, the 5-8 tailback often falls prey.to
injuries. Marek missed all or part of three
contests last season, including over three quar-
ters of the Michigan game.
Though he suffered a collarbone bruise in
practice two weeks ago, Marek returned to this
week's contact drills.
"Any team in the Big Ten can beat me up
physically," Marek admitted at a pre-season
press conference.
Even without Marek the Badger ground game
remains impressive.
Marek's backup, sophomore Mike Morgan,
comes off a 466-yard debut including two
hundred-yard games and eight touchdowns.
WISCONSIN'S TOP two fullbacks form an
equally impressive tandem. Senior Ken Starch
gained 643 yards in 1974 and barely trailed
Marek with 5.8 yards per carry.
Junior Larry "Sweet C" Canada played often
enough to garner 358 yards last season and
adds blocking force with his 6-2, 227 frame.
Marek and Company accomplish their feats

attackASIAN AMERICAN
attack,
behind an outstanding offensive line appropriate PROGRAM: 1. Welcome new and any interested students.
ly dubbed "Marek's Marauders." . Upcoming service and social activities of East Wind for
The right side features two potential All- Students of Asian-American background.
Americans, guard Terry Stieve and tackle Den- 3. Introduction to Asian-American Heritage.
nis Lick. Stieve (6-2, 256) reportedly added 4. Party with drinks and food.
weight and strength over the summer and re-
turns better than ever. Lick (6-3, 262) is simply Sponsored by DATE: Sept. 13, Saturday
regarded as one of the best. EAST WIND 7:30 p.m.
"IF THERE'S A better tackle in the country,
I"wn t THee' hi r sai Badgr le coch An Established PLACE: University Ecumenical Center
Chuck McBride. "He has exceptional balance UM Student Organization 921 Church St.
and picks up assignments right away." CLIP AND SAVE
Opposing defendersswill also take their
brother Steve. The 6-1, 235 sophomore is ex-. Z~iU W -2 ;
pected to follow his brother to stardom.
At the quarterback position . . . who knows? ANDY WARHOL Painted "The Campbell Soup Can"
Badger coach John Jardine shuffled three can-
didates in practice in an effort to replace*
graduated Greg Bohlig. ANDY WARHOL Produced The Film "Blow Job"
SENIOR DAN KOPINA, who understudied
Bohlig the last two years, probably has the ANDY WARHOL Managed The Rock Group, The "Velvet Underground"
inside track. Kopina saw only limited action
but Jardine feels his varsity experience will ANDY WARHOL Pointed"Jacqueline Kennedy" "&'Marilyn Monroe
help him avoid mistakes. Kopina also runs well,
and even played at tailback in spring drills.
Other quarterback candidates include fresh- ANDY WARHOL Painted "The Rrillo Soap Pad Box"
man Tony Dudley and junior Mike Carroll. Jar- * 0
dine credits Dudley, a formerDetroiteNorthern ANDY WARHOL Is The Granddaddy of Pop Art
star, with the most ability of the three but said *NY * *i heGadadyo opAtt
he lacks experience. Carroll's hopes rest on a
strong passing arm. ANDY WARHOL Produced The Film "Taylor Mead's Ass"
Passing, however, should remain somewhat * * *
of a rarity at Wisconsin. Even Bohlig averaged ANDY WARHOL Paintings Are In The Permanent Collections
only eleven passes per game last season and the Of Museums All Over The World
top three receivers - who snared 50 of the
Badgers' 81 completions - have graduated.
A QUARTET OF juniors fill this year's pass- ANDY WARHOL Produced A "Schrafft's" TV Commercial
catching slots. Randy Rose and Ray Bailey ap-
pear deadlocked at split end and Ron Pollard, I ANDY WARHOL Wrote The Novel "A"
who can also run, returns at flanker. Former * * *
Plymouth High standout Ron Egloff moves inAWP hM lJ a e
at tight end. Marek, the squad's top returning ANDY WARHOL Publishes The Monthly Film Journal inervie
receiver, can also catch the ball.
Wisconsin won't have the only run-oriented at- ANDY WARHOL Painted "The Electric Chair"
tack with a mystery quarterback in Camp Ran-
dall Stadium come Saturday, but they just might ANDY WARHOL Produced The Film "Blue Movie"
have the best. Still, if defenses do indeed win ,
ball games, even the conference's best offense WAR HOL JUST WROTE
may not be enough to beat Michigan. "THE PHILOSOPHY OF ANDY WARHOL4
FROM A TO B AND BACK AGAIN
. BILLBOARD $7.95
ieA call-out is scheduled on ".}
Monday, September 15, at 6 ANDY WARHOL will be at CENTICORE
p.m. at Matt Mann Pool, for all;HA.s
m that remains prospective members of the wo- BOOKSHOP MONDAY, SEPT. 15 to si
T, Illinois, prob- men's swim team. Coach Stuart Books and ra with ou. COME!
. The Ilini just P Y
quarterback to Isaac also needs a student man- ,.3Oomto3:O0 m
MSU, Michigan, ager.1: a t3 0 m
isin. They lost
and are going _ __ _
ve Kopatz. Ko-
ave the exper
to lead the team C nticore b 0 s oC4
to be said for 1D Crie B 336 MAYNARD STREET
they have a re- P t ervice
sive secondary ,. c . e$ ' '%
Mike Gow and -- -_---
They also have 11 r I1I1 111ATA

Daily Photo by KEN FINK
The vaunted Michigan defense will be put to the test tomor-
row when it squares off against the equally imposing Wiscon-
sin offense at Madison's Camp Randall Field. Middle guard
Tim Davis (56), shown here with the graduated ,Tom Drake
(28) in last year's Ohio State game, is one of the veterans
being counted on to thwart the Badgers.

M, OSU, MSU VIE FOR CROWN

No claims on Big

Ten ti

By DAVE WIHAK
With the Big Ten football
s e a s o n rapidly approaching,
every football fan in the area
is trying to size up the real
contenders. In fact, even Jimmy
the Greek is second-guessing.
Ohio State is probably the
safest bet, next to Michigan.
The Buckeyes' chances rest on
two "name" players-quarter-
back Cornelius Green and tail-
back Archie Griffin. Their run-
ning ability is well known in the
Big Ten, and big things are ex-
pected of them this year.
But with the loss of three
men on the offensive line,
that running game may be
hampered unless Hayes can
find adequate replacements.
Defensively, the Buckeyes suf-
fered through graduation. Hav-
ing lost eight starters. inclding
Van Decree, Pete Cusick and
Neil Colzie, the Buckeves will
be fielding a lot of unknowns.

OSU boasts key personnel in
safety Tim Fox, tackle Nick
Buonomici, and linebacker Ken
Kuhn.
Before passing over the Buck-
eyes' strength too quickly, one
should remember their kicking
game. For some reason the
name Tom Klaban comes to
mind. He's that Czechoslovak-
ian field goal kicker.
There are a couple of black
marks -against the Buckeyes
which could be their downfall.
They play road games at East
Lansing and Ann Arbor, and in
the close matches that both
games shape up to be, the home
team advantage will be a heavy
factor.
The Spartans of Michigan
State will rely heavily on
quarterback Charlie Baggett
to lead them to the promised
land. Last yepr, he passed for
965 yards and scrambled for
11 touchdowns. He will be the
key to how well the Spartans

do this year, despite any im-
provements they may have
made defensively.
Fullback Levi Jackson will re-
turn to give the Spartans a well
balanced running attack, and as
Ohio State will attest, a poten-
tial breakaway threat.
The offensive line will have
strength in tight end Mike Cobb
and guard Greg Croxton, but
the Spartans may fall short in
wide receivers. State is going
with inexperienced people that
just might prove its greatest
weakness.
Defensively, the Spartans
have a premier end in Otto
Smith, and with Greg Schaum
returning they have the nucleus
of a strong defensive line. Their
linebacking corps is not the
best, although they have exper-
ienced men in Kim Rowekamp
and Pat McClowry. State has
three starters returning in the
defensive secondary which
should complement its line very
well.

The only team
to be mentioned
ably shouldn't be
don't have the
compete with M
OSU or Wiscom
Jeff Hollenbach,
with senior Stev
patz doesn't ha
ience necessary
very far.
The only thing,
the Illini is that1
spectable defen
with players like
Bill Kleckner.T

an excellent placekicker in Dan
Beaver. In two seasons with the
Illini, Beaver has piled up 102
points.
If Illinois has any hopes of
beating Michigan, OSU, or:
MSU, they'll have to borrow the
Rock of Gibraltar to fill the gap-
ing holes in their defensive line.
Dr. Paul C. Uslan
OPTOMETRIST I

JUG rnuiu
Ann Arbor's
largest
processing lab.
3180 Packard
1 block East of Platt
973-0770

le. mac.

I IRMW

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yr, ...:. . ..:. .....:. ...... .*.
Major League Standings

The Spartans may be ham-I
pered by a tough early sched-
nie. They will open against

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East
WV L P'ct. GB
Boston 86 60 .589 -
Baltimore 81 65 .555 5
New York 75 71 .514 11
Cleveland 70 72 .493 14
Milwaukee 62 85 .422 24y2
Detroit 55 91 .377 31
West
Oakland 88 56 .611 -
Kansas City 80 64 .556 8
'Texas 72 75 .490 17'X
Chicago 68 76 .472 17%
Minnesota 66 75 .468 20"
California 66 79 .455 2211
Yesterday's Games
Boston 3, Detroit 1
Baltimore 10, Cleveland 2
New York 10, Milwaukee 2
Tonight's (ames
Oakland (Bosman 9-5 and Siebert
4-4) at Minnesota (HUghes 14-12
and Bane 0-0), t-n
California (Kirkwood 5-4 and
Singer 7-14) at Kansas City (Bird
9-5 and Fitzmorris 14-10), t-n
Milwaukee (Slaton 11-18) at Bos-
ton (Cleveland 11-9)
Baltimore (Torres 17-8) at De-
troit (Coleman 9-16)
Cleveland (Peterson 12-7) at New
York (May 13-10)
Chicago (Ostren 7-14 or Jefferson
4-9) at Texas (Jenkins 16-15)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East

Ios Angeles 78 68 .534 18 4
San Francisco 70 76 .479 26%
San Diego 66 80 .452 30% .
Atlanta 64 82 .438 32%2
Houston 58 90 .392 39y2
Cincy clinched division title
Yesterday's Games
Chicago 12, St. Louis 6
nouston 4, San Francisco 3, 12
innings
New Tork 7, Pittsburgh 0
Philadelphia 5, Montreal 2, called
at 7 innings, rain
Atlanta at San Diego, inc.
Cincinnati at Los Angeles, inc.
Tonight's Games
Montreal (Blair 8-15) at Pitts-
burgh (Candelaria 7-5)
New York (Matlack 16-10) at St.
Louis (McGlothen 14-11)
Houston (Richard 10-9) at San
Diego (Spiliner 5-12)
Atlanta (Niekro 14-12) at Los
Angeles (Sutton 16-12)j
Cincinnati (Gullett 13-3) at San
Francisco (Falcone 11-10) .

OSU, then play Miami of Ohio, Full Contact LensS
North Carolina State, Notre Visual Examinat
Dame, and Michigan. If they 58CUC
get through that unscathed, 548 CHURCH
chances are they would win 663-2476
the Big Ten. That's a big "if."

Service
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KOSHER
MEAT COOP
MEETING
Sunday, Sept. '14
I0 a.m.
at H ILLEL-
1429 HILL ST.
663-3336 I

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Rush Registration
Call: 663 4505

ANN ARBOR
CIVIC BALLET
AUDITIONS_
Fo~r Iiin ior r n el t nrCnrr

Mass Meeting

from Reprise

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1 WEE

Sentember 18.7:30 nm

Thurs. 10-9; Fri. 10-mid.
Sat. 10-9; Sun. 12-6

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