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September 12, 1975 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-09-12

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Friday, September, 12, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pogo "M re4

Friday, September 12, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Boyle gets
life terms
MEDIA, Pa. (') - W. A.
"Tony" Boyle, a man who once
counseled presidents of the Unit-
ed States as head of the power-
ful United Mine Workers
(UMW), was sentenced to three
consecutive life sentences yes-
terday for ordering the 1969 as-
sassination of a union rival.
"All I can say is I'm inno-
ent," said the pale 73-year-old
Boyle in a firm voice as he
stood erect and unsmiling be-
fore Delaware County Judge
Francis Catania. Then he
blinked his blue eyes, bit his
lips, clasped his hands behind
his back and remained silent.
BOYLE was convicted in the
same courtroom 17 months ago
of three counts of first-degree
murder for the Dec. 31, 1969
shootings of Joseph "Jock" Yab-
lonski; his wife, Margaret, and
daughter, Charlotte, while they
slept in their Clarksville, Pa.,
home. n
Special Prosecutor Richard
Sprague, who had successfully
prosecuted seven other men and
a woman in the Yablonski slay-
ings, demanded the severest
penalty-consecutive life terms
-because Boyle "caused a
whole family to be assassin-
ated."
Boyle currently is serving a
three-year federal sentence in
Springfield, Mo., for illegallyl
using UMW funds in the 1968
presidential election in support
of Republican Richard Nixon.
That sentence will be complet-
ed at the end of 1976.
Catania ordered Boyle to be-
gin his murder sentences in a
state prison at Dallas, Pa., aft-
er completing the federal term.
He also fined Boyle $100 for
each murder conviction, and or-
dered him to pay court costs
estimated at more than $25,000.

Govt. predicts further
grain sales t0 Soviets

U-M SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING CLUB
MIC-HlI 1S-
CLINICS and TRYOUTS

WASHINGTON 0') - The Ag-l
riculture Department revised
slightly downward yesterday its'
forecast of a record U.S. grain
harvest. But the prediction in-
dicated ample grain would be
produced to permit further sales
to the Soviet Union.
The corn crop is expected to
total nearly 5.69 billion bushels,
USDA said. Wheat production
was estimated at 2.14 billion
bushels. Both are records.
IF THE wheat harvest comes
in at the predicted level, it
would mean the United States
would have nearly 769 million
bushels of wheat available for
foreign sale without jeopardiz-
ing domestic supplies.
The United States is expected
to consume 71.2 million bushels
of wheat this year. Foreign
wheat sales are expected to to-
tal 1.3 billion bushels, including
the 154 million bushels already,
sold to the Soviet Union. !
Total foreign sales of corn are}
expected to be about 1.5 billion
bushels.
ALTHOUGH the forecasts in-
dicate ample grain will be avail-
able for foreign sale, uncertain-
ty over the actual harvest has
prompted some speculation in
the commodity market and
caused some price increases.
Agriculture Department econ-
omists say the grain purchased
thus far by the Soviet Union will
add about 1.5 per cent to con-
sumer food prices through 1976.
President Ford, campaigning
in New Hampshire, did not rule
out the possibility that the Unit-
ed States might attempt to swap
American wheat for Soviet oil.
In an interview, Ford said, "I
wouldn't rule out the possibility
that that might materialize."

corn, 154 million of wheat andf
51 million bushels of barley. c
The purchases, precipitated
by widespread drought in Rus-
sia, triggered protests from
maritime unions and AFL-CIO
President George Meany who,
said grain ships would not be1
loaded without assurances fromt
the administration that Ameri-
can consumers would not suffer..
After a meeting Tuesday with I
President Ford, Meany and I
maritime leaders said they
would wait 30 days before de-c
ciding whether to resume thei
grain ship boycott. Ford said no
Farm wor
remains iu
LIVINGSTON, Calif. (AP) -
The struggle for union represen-
tation of field workers at E & J
Gallo, the world's largest win-
ery, remained undecided yester-
day because of vote challenges
that could affect the outcome.-
The Teamsters Union, locked
in a battle with the Cesar Cha-
vez-led United Farm Workers,c
(UFW), was ahead in unchal-
lenged votes 223-131. But there I

further sales would be made * WED., SEPT. 17-24-OCT. 1
during that time.
Ford also promised to seek 7-9 P.M.
long-term agreements from Rus- -. MARGARET BELL POOL
sia for future purchases of
grain so that U.S. markets and
consumer food prices are not -
disrupted as they have been in
the past.
The Soviets have indicated
they want to buy more U.S.
grain, possibly another 300 mil-
lion bushels or more of wheat
and corn, according to analysts.
Ihree years ago, in sudden, se- I
cret deals, Russia bought 433 I O U o B
million bushels of U.S. wheat
and 244 million bushels of corn.
218 N. DIVISION 665-0606
ker vote iPTLUCK PICNICS
FRIDAYS around 6:00 p.m.
Come on by to the big, blue house on the corner of Cath-
erine & Division, two blocks north of Huron, and meet the
folks who live there and those who like to drop by. Bring
sponibiity f aoptng rlesfor some food or drink if you con, but if you can't, don't let
sponsibility of adopting rules for thatstop you. There's always enough to go around. Have a
voting in cases where an econ- p.
omic strike," began before the p'enic with us before you go out for the evening.
new election law took effect The House is open 9-6, Tuesdays through Sundays, as a
Aug. 28. place to have coffee with a friend, read the paper, study,
Such regulations are still to or just talk.
be drawn up, so elections super- Feast of Thanksgiving on Sundays at Noon.
visor Cornelius Beltran ordered
the ballot box containing all CHAPLAINS: THE REV. ANDREW FOSTER
challenges sealed until the THE REV. BRUCE CAMPBELL
ALRB acts.

._ ter.. r ..r... i a .i, ice. ..a.

..

AP Photo
Big bite
Construction work ers demolishing an old building in Tucson,
Arizona, add a bit of humor to their work, using the name of
the movie thrilling audiences everywhere.

IN A
months
chased

ROUND of orders two
ago, the Soviets pur-
177 million bushels of

were 198 challenged votes still
to be counted.
STATE officials set a meeting
for next Tuesday to discuss the ADVERTISNG IN
challenged votes.
Chavez said his union wants
officials to allow 130 ballots to
be counted from people who 4
struck when Gallo's contract
1973 and Gallo signed with the A icl qau a
Teamsters.
But the UFW is opposed to
including the votes of 36 field -ET T
security guards and eight su-
pervisors. The balance of the
challenged votes are 24 workers
not on the list of Gallo employes.
IF ALL the votes are allowed l IT
except the 24 workers not on
the employe list, the UFW sup
sters would still win a slim vic- YOU'RE READING THIS, AREN'T YOU?4
tory, 267-261. It was not known
who challenged the remaining 24 I
votes. Display-764-0554 Classifieds-764-0557
The five-member state Agri- ,
cultural Labor Relations Board
(ALRB) is vested with the re-o--

Sinai guards

face danger,

LUFFER ZONE, Sinai Desert
(T)) - Landmine explosions and
terrorist bullets - these are
some of the dangers American
civilians may face when they
come to the Middle East to help
enforce the latest Israeli-Egyp-
tian truce pact.
Under the accord worked out
by Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger, still to be approved
by the U.S. Congress, up. to 200
American technicians are to op-
erate electronic listening posts
in the Sinai Desert in a new
United Nations buffer zone.,
FIVE HUNDRED Swedish
U.N. soldiers have been man-.
Of the major languages spok-
en today, Chinese has the most
users-more than 780 million.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. S
Friday, September 12, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a iil y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street. Anp
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.50 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).
CHARING CROSS
BOOKSHOP
Used, Fine and Scholarly Books
316 S. STATE-994-4041
Open Mon.-Fri. 10-8,
Sat. 10-6

ning part of the old buffer zone
a few miles away for more than
a year. The Swedish desert vet-
erans say life might be tough
for the U.S. civilians.
"There are landmines all over
the place," says a Swedish cap-
tain bouncing through the sand
and heat in a desert patrol car.
Rows of deadly explosive
charges, Israeli and Egyptian,
lie a yard on each side of the
car and stretch as far as the
eye can see.
At least five U.N. soldiers
were killed in the Sinai last year
by exploding mines, despite
safety paths cleared by Polish
army sappers. "Nobody knows
how many mines there are in
the buffer zone," says Lt. Col.
Nils-Goran Staf of the Royal
Guards, deputy commander of
the Swedish contingent. "Butl
DAY CARE
CORNTREE CO-OP
AGES 21/2-5
CALL
LINDA FOSTER
665-0606

there are millions of them."
"WE can avoid the mines -
they are marked on maps,"
says a Swedish private. "But
we can't map the scorpions or
mice, and we have a lot of
both." The Swedes haven't lost
a man yet to a scorpion bite,
but they keep their first aid kits
handy.
The Americans will be sta-
tioned seven to 11 miles east of
the present buffer, in the bleak
Gidi and Mitla mountain passes,
but the passes have their mine-
fields, too, and scorpions abound
all over the Sinai.
A deadlier danger could be
the Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization, whose newspaper has
urged Arab patriots to shoot
the Americans as "an enemy
target."
IT WOULD be difficult for a
Palestinian terrorist to pene-
trate the remote truce pact
zone, and U.S. officials say the
Americans will be out of guer-
rilla gun range.
But the technicians likely will

be sightseeing and living off
duty in Egypt, where they
would not be immune to sniper
bullets, or in Israel, where Arab
raiders have staged nine blood-
baths.
The Americans will keep
watch on military movements
from sophisticated stations full
of secret electronic gadgetry.
They are to be volunteers, some
of them former CIA employes,
and their reported salary will
be $40,000 a year.
Te Dee A.Theof it
studio
school of dance
ballet
tap
jazz
995-1747 modern
220 so. main st.
ann arbor, mich.

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11

I

NEW TRENDS
FOR 1975
Trims-Shags
and Razor Cuts
--2 SHOPS-
Dascola Stylists
611 E. University
615 E. Liberty

1976-77 MARSHALL-RHODES-POWER
LONDON EXCHANGE
SCHOLARSH IPS
Nominations and applications for Senior Scho-
larships are now being accepted. These scholar-
ships support successful candidates for one or'
more years of study in Great Britain.
The programs include:
1) RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS (two years of study
at Oxford, males onlv).
2) MARSHALL SCHOLARSHIPS (two years of study
t any British University, males and females).
3) THE POWER FELLOWSHIP (two years at
Magadene College, Cambridge, males only).
4) THE LONDON EXCHANGE FELLOWSHIP (one
year, University College, London,
males and females).
Outstanding seniors and recent graduates are eligible
and are encouraged to apply. Faculty are encouraged
to submit names of candidates as well. Please contact
Sam Wheelis, Director of the Office of Study Abroad
and Senior Scholarships, 1413 Mason Hall, between
1:00 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.

Ann Arbor's Third Annual
'ETHNIC 'FIK*, IA
SEPTEMBER 12 and 13
11 a.m. 'tl 11 p.m.
ON THE MAIN ST. PROMENADE ..
Main Street will be closed from
William to Huron and Liberty
from Fourth to Ashley.
D
Discover and enjoy the
traditions of1
20 ETHNIC CULTURES
TENTS * FLAGS
SIDEWALK CAFES
MUSIC
FOODS. ARTIFACTS
ENTERTAINMENT from 5:00 p.m. to 11 p.m.
M FOLK DANCES FASHION SHOW
ETHNIC BANDS BALADI DANCERS
FOLK SINGERS

I I

I

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Come on down to 420 Maynard anytime and
join the business, news, sports or photography
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FRIDAY, SEPT. 12
FIRST SHABBAT of the Semester
SWould Like to Welcome You Back with a
Cmunity Shabbat Dinner at 7 p.m. Make
Reservations by 1 p.m. Fri., Sept. 12.
Minyan Davening .......6:00 p.m.
nrr U nrv rftfAc tn w w

i

it
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is back
at
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