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September 11, 1976 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-11

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Saturday, September 11, 1976

THEM HIGAILY

I
s
k

Eyewitness recounts

C'luHc/t enoice4

Peasant

re actions

to

Mao's death

AP Photo

A boy and his grasshopper

BEGIN IN AFRICA MONDAY:

K A
Kissinger talks unlikely
tosolve racial strife
J 0 H A N N E S B U R G, persuade the whites to bow to themselves are divided on how
South Africa (P)-Prospects for black demands in return for a to approach Rhodesia. Angola
peaceful and lasting settlement $1.5 billion package guarantee- and Mozambique, both heavily
of the racial crisis in southern ing their assets and the pro- supported by the Soviet Union,
Africa appear dim despite the mise of massive American eco- are regarded as the most mili-
high-powered U. S. initiative in nomic aid after black rule is tant and in favor of continued
the area. . established. war, while Zambia and Bots-
Many political and diplomatic I But many observers in the wana are believed to want a
observers in South Africa, where Rhodesian capital of Salisbury negotiated settlement in Rho-
racial violence continued to doubt Smith will accept what desia.
claim lives yesterday, are they call a "sellout." In any A negotiated settlement in
skeptical that the negotiating case a sharp four-way split in Rhodesia must produce genu-
skills of U. . S. Secretary of the black nationalist movement tne black majority rule in two
State Henry Kissinger will be makes negotiations proble- years, or the protracted guer-
able to stem the tide of con- matic. rilla war is likely to escalate
flict. sharply, possibly with the aid
Kissiner .apparently hopes of Cuban troops.
KISSINGER flies to southern South Af , on which Rhode- South-West Africa is trouble-
Africa on Monday. sia ree Amost entirely some because militant black
The stakes are high in a re- trade, will pressure Smith into nationalists refuse to accept
gion coveted for its mineral an agreement. constitutional talks now under
wealth and its vital geographic way among the territory's 11
location between the Indian and BUT SOUTH African Prime ethnic groups, including te rul-
Atlantic oceans. Minister John Vorster has ruled ic grous,
Kissinger is trying to roll' out any economic sanctions in The multiracial constitutional
1..1,,.r ,consideration of his ultra-con- ;r, ,-

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The followingF
dispatch wasswritten by the editor
of the W~all Street Journal's editor-
ial page, who was in China at the
time of Chairman Mao Tse-tung's
death.
By ROBERT L. BARTLEY 1
The Wall Street Journal
PEKING (AP) - Former De-!
fense Secretary James Schles-
inger was reviewing troops of
the People's Liberation Army
at the Third Garrison Division
base 90 minutes north of Pe-
king when a loudspeaker sound-
ed the notes of the "Interna-
tionale."
An instant later we learned
that the anthem of internation-
al Communism was played not
for Schlesinger, but for the
death of Chairman Mao Tse-
tung, leader of the Chinese Com-
munist revolution and for the
last 27 years ruler kf one-fourth
of mankind.
The procession of cars start-
ed back to Peking. In one car
Ma Yu-chen, information chief
for the Chinese Foreign Minis-
try, started to translate for two
American journalists the official
announcement.
THE BROADCAST announced
"with extreme grief" that Chair-
man Mao had died at 10 min-
utes after midnight the preced-
ing morning. The announce-
ment was broadcast at 4 p.m.
and was rebroadcast all night.
At first, the peasants lining
the road seemed not to know.
A girl in a red-checked blouse
waved gaily to an acquaintance.
Nothing seemed unusual until
gradually one realized the road
was filling with a somber pro-
cession. There were lines of bi-
cycles, some with pigs or bund-
les of fodder on back plat-
forms: carts pulled by small
tractors, horses and mules; and'
an occasional truckload of
peasants. The workkers were be-
ing called back from the fields.
Those who had not yet joined
the procession stood idly in the
fields. A team of ditch-diggers,
stoody blankly with picks and
shovels in hand. Workers squat-
ted in circles in villages.
MA CONTINUED translating
the official announcement:
Chairman Mao founded and led
the revolution and the army and
overcame "left and right oppor-I
tunists." He announced the his-
toris theory that the bourgeoisie
exist within the party, fought
revisionism and provided a new
and fuller experience of world
'significance.
It is now time to "turn grief
into strength," the announce-
ment said, by carrying out
Mao's last will - continuing the
class struggle of unifying
around the Central Committee
of the Communist party, being
prepared against foreign aggres-
sion, "liberating" Taiwan, nev-'

of blue and gray.
AT 5:35 P.M. the first black
arm band appears. Soon two
more are seen and through our
drive their numbers grow. Nor-
mally cyclists ignore motor cars
with abandon and the cars honk
furiously. But now silence, bro-
ken only by an occasional de-
corous beep.
The procession arrives at the
Peking Hotel and the Americans
offer condolences to the Chi-
nese. No one seems sure what
to do next.
By 7 p.m. a harvest moon
rises over Tien An Men Square,
the heart of Peking. The dark-
ness gathers, accentuating the
huge portrait of Meo over the
gate to the Forbidden City, the
palaces built for the emperors
of China in the early 1400s. His
portrait is flanked by Chinese
inscriptions that say "Long
Live the Chinese People's Re-
public," "Long Live the Solidar-
ity of the People of the World,"
and "Long Live Chairman
Mao.'
THE CROWD of a few thou-
sand far from fills the huge
square, but gathers in clumps
and knots, diminished and re-
plenished by passing cyclists.
The biggest group is in front
of the Forbidden City. One gray-
clad youth goes to the foot of
the bridge through the gate
and bows from the waist. He
advances halfway across the
bridge, bows again and retires
without turning his back.
A mother in pigtails stands
with an arm around her daugh-
ter in pigtails. A young couple
sits side-by-side, holding hands,
a sight almost unknown in this
city.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No. 3
Saturday, September 11, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at thetUniversity of Michigan. Newrs
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a iily Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street. Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters): $13 by mail outside Ann
Arhor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

.1

er seeking hegemony or "be-
coming a superpower."
One lane of the four-lane high-
way that begins just outside
Peking is full of cyclists head-
ing into the city, a vast river.

Across the street from the'
gate a man stands rigidly and
silently with his head stiffly
bowed. A bit behind him are
two more in the same position.
Near the other end of the
square a group sits in a cir-
cle listening to a radio broad-
cast of the announcement. Be-
yond it is the "Monument to
the People's Heroes," rows as-
cending and descending. At the
top four wreaths already have
been laid. A soldier pulls a
low chain across the entrance
to the monument, which stops
no one.
AT THE REPORTERS' urg-
ing, Benoit tries to strike up
a conversation by offering con-
dolences to a young man. With-
in three seconds a circle of
50 people has gathered and the
foreigners beat a hasty retreat.
They pass two men sobbing
openly. Two of the three rigid
head-bowers are still in their
positions.
What Mao's death may por-
tend for the Chinese people we
will learn another day. The Chi-
nese themselves talk of con-
stant struggle against "capital-
ist roaders." And the succes-
sion of Premier Chou En-lai
was decided only after a riot
of 100,000 people in Tien An
men Square.
Let the superstitious recall
that the Chinese regarded earth-
quakes like those this year as
portending changes in the "man-
date of heaven" and a new
dynasty. Let the China watch-
ers weigh, uselessly, if experi-
ence is any guide, the nuances
of the official proclamation.
IN HUMAN TERMS the emo-
tions in the faces seen in Pe-
king in the hours after the an-
nouncement of Mao's death
were last seen by this writer
some 13 years ago as a cub
reporter. The assignment was
to go into the streets and ask
Americans what they thought
of the assassination of John F.
Kennedy.
Daily Official Bulletin
saturday,september 11, 1976
Day Calendar
Football: UM vs. Wisconsin, Sta-
dium, 1:30 pm, (broadcast over
WUOM, 1:15 pm).
Word of God: Concert, '"The
Lighthouse," Power Ctr., 8 pm.
Black Repertory Company: Cald-
wel's "The Devil and Otis Red-
ding or The King of Soul," Arena
Theatre, Frieze, 8 pm.
WUOM: "Jazz Revisited Request
Night," 8:05 pm.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Morning Worship at
9:15 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Bible Study
at 9:15 p.m.
Midweek Worship Wednesday,
10 p.m.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
662-4466
Worship at 9:30 and 11:00 on
Sundays.
Student coffee hour at 12:00.
Recreation-supper e v e n t on
church lawn at 4:30 Sunday,
Sept. 12.
College program under direc-
tion of the Rev. Graham Pat-
terson.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
The Rev. Fred B. Maitland
The Rev. E. Jack Lemon
Worship Services at 9:00 and
11:00.
Church School at 9:00 and
11:00.
Adult Enrichment at 10:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Student groups active pro-
gramming worship and study.
Stop in or call us. 602 E. Huron,
668-6881.
* * *
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Rev. Terry N. Smith,
Senior Minister
608 E. William, corner of State
Worship Service-10:30 a.m.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL-A Campus
Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
Welcome to all students!
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship
-"Hospitality.'
11:15 a.m.-Coffee Hour.
6:00 p.m. - Service of Holy
Communion-"God's "Hospital-
ity."
"God's people in God's world
for God's purpose."
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Service at 11:00 a.m.
ST. MARY STUDENT
CHAPEL (Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday, 5 p.m., 11:30 p.m.
Sunday - 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
(,nlns 9:30 a.m. North Campus).

AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER
502 E. Huron-663-9376
Ronald E. Carey,
Campus Minister
Sunday Morning Worship-10
a.m. First Baptist Church.
Bible Study-11 a.m.
Fellowship Meeting Tuesday
at 7:30 p.m.
ANN ARBOR CHURCH OF
CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of U of M
Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday 9:30
a.m.; Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship -Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m.
Need transportation? Call 662-
9928.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
* * *
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Services and Sunday
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-8:00 p.m.
Child Care Sunday--under 2
years.
Midweek Informal Worship.
Reading Room-306 E. Liber-
ty, 10 - 5 Monday - Saturday;
closed Sundays.
* * *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH
1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
* * *
BETHEL A.M.E. CHURCH
900 Plum-663-3800
Rev. John A. Woods, Pastor
Sunday Morning Services -
8:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School-9:00 a.m.
Transportation available.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at the
Ann Arbor Y, 530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transpor-
tation: 663-3233 or 426-3808.
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship.
Try
Daily

back growing SovIeti nuuence
in the region by ending Soviet-
backed guerrilla wars in Rho-
desia and South-West Africa,
also called Namibia, and by
bringing racial harmony toI
South Africa.1
THE UNITED States, while
advocating guaranteed rights
for the white minorities, is,
pushing for black majority rule
in Rhodesia and South-West
Africa and stressing the need 4
for comprehensive change in
South Africa.l
Rhodesia, where 270,000 whitesj
rule some six million blacks, is
afflicted by the most explosive~
situation and perhaps the most
difficult to resolve. Prime
Minister Ian Smith has been
defying demands by Britain, the
former colonial ruler, to bring
about black majority rule for
over a decade.
His country is now embroiled
in an escalating hit-and-run war
with black nationalists operat-
ing from bases in Mozambique,j
Zambia and Tanzania and arm-
ed with Soviet guns.
K IS S I N G E R hopes to

servative white electorate.
The black nationalist move-
ment in Rhodesia is so sharply
divided that many observers in
neighboring Zambia believe if
the whites eventually abdicate,
a major civil war in the coun-
try is inevitable.
The presidents of Zambia,
Tanzania, Mozambique, Bots-
wana and Angola, who met in
Tanzania last week, again fail-
ed in continuing efforts to unite
the competing factions in the
black nationalist movement.
THE FIVE black nations
GROUP TRAINING
WORKSHOP
Expand counseling skills--
Work on personal issues--
Ongoing & Weekend
CALL
LIFEWORK
COUNSELING
995-0088 leave message for
Richard Kempter-Leader.

conference has agreed on Dec.
31, 1978, as the date for South-
West Africa's independence
from South African rule. But
the South-West Africa People's
Organization, which is conduct-
ing the war and is recognized
by the United Nations as the
sole representative of blacks in
the territory, refuses to join
the talks.

Cl

lassifieds

9

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Flexible Programs and Hours
Over 38 years of experience and success. Small classes. Voluminous
home study materials. Courses that are constantly updated. Centers
open days and weekends all year. Complete tape facilities for review
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missed lessons at our centers.
. Write or call:
1945 Pauline Blvd. KAPU N
Ann Arbor 48103 TEST PREPARATION
662-3149 SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938
Call Toll Free (outside N.Y. State) 800 - 221-9840
For
Affiliated Centers in Major U. S. Cities

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DISCOVER

FLYMI

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THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN FLYERS INVITE YOU TO

introductory Ground School Meeting
MONDAY, SEPT. 20, 7:00 P.M.,
Room 3080 East Engineering

For More Information
CALL 769-6367

t

1p.

-LS & A SCHOLARSHIPS-
LS & A Scholarship applications for winter 1977 will be
available in 1220 Angell Hall beginning Sept. 13, 1976.
To qualify for scholarship consideration, a student must be
an LS & A undergraduate and have attended the Univer-
sity of Michigan for at least one full term. Sophomores
must have a U of M grade point average of 3.6 or better
and Juniors and Seniors must have a GPA of at least 3.5.
The awards are based on financial need and on academic
merit. Completed applications must be returned to 1220
Angell Hall by October 11.
FOXX
50c Discount on Admission
With Student I.D.
r1 COMING: Tues., Sept. 14 '

OPEN

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