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September 10, 1976 - Image 19

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-10

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Friday, September 10, 1916

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.FridaySeptember'1 , 19---- -H----IC--G-N --I-Y

Caveat emptor: Bicentennial
ripoff artists swindle public
DETROIT (UPI) - What lighten the public on such en- to police or law enforcement
better way to get into "the terprises. officials that they've been had.
Spirit of '76" than a cruise Bank spokespersons said the And it's these silent victims,
aboard the majectic S.S. United major problem connected with the spokespersons said, who
States. swindles iS that victims often keep the crafty con-artists in
The only trouble is, the lux- are too embarrassed to admit business.
ury liner has been in mothballs - --
since 1969.
But that hasn't stopped Bi-
centennial ripoff artists from PLA
selling reservations by the fist-
ful, says a Detroit bank ex-
ecutive who has been keeping M A RK ET
track of such swindles.
WILLIAM KALMER, assist- TODAY, Friday, Sept. 10
ant vice president in charge of 1 .00-9.00 P.M
auditing at Detroit Bank &
Trust, said some of the schem- First United Methodist Church
es are so ingenious they merit
Benedict Arnold Awards. Corner of State and Huron
Among' the most popular and
successful swindles con men Sponsored by the Notional Organization for Women
have wrapped in red, white and
blue packages are:
- The so-called "John Paul
Jones Special." That's the oneI
where reservations are sold for
the cruise aboard the moth-ball-
ed luxury liner.

Dage Nineteen
"Health and Healing Energy"
Weekly presentations at Canterbury
Friday, September 10th
POLARITY THERAPY
AND ACUPUNCTURE
) MAX HEIRICH, MIKI SHIMA
8 p.m. herb tea 8:30 discussion
Canterbiry llou~e
218 N. DIVISION ST.
corner of Catherine and Division
for information: 665-0606
HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF APPLICATIONS
FOR 1976-77 ACADEMIC YEAR
Available Starting September 10, 1976
In Housing Office
1500 S.A.B.
POSITIONS INCLUDE:
Resident Advisor-Thronson, South Quad
(Undergraduate Female Corridor)
Resident Advisor-Bush, South Quad
(Undergradaute Female Corridor)
Resident Advisor-Huber, South Quad
(Undergraduate Male Corridor)
Resident Advisor-Helen Newberry
(Undergraduate Female Corridor)
Resident Advisor-Rumsey, West Quad
(Undergraduate Male Corridor)
Resident Advisor-Mosher/Jordan
(Undergraduate Male Corridor)
Advisory positions require Junior status or
above during the period of employment.
QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U. of M.
student on the Ann Arbor Campus in good academic stand-
ing during the period of employment. (2) Must have lived
in residence halls at University level for at least one year.
(3) Must have a 2.5 grade point average at time of appli-
cation. (4) Preference is given to applicants who do not
intend to carry heavy academic schedules and who do not
have rigorous outside commitments. (5) Proof of these
qualifications may be required.
Current staff and other applicants who have an applica-
tion on file must come to this office to update their
application form.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS:
3:00 P.M., September 17, 1976
A NON-DISCRIMINATORY AFFIRMATIVE
________ -ACTION EMPLOYER ____

Da~l Photo by PAUINE LUBENS
Dylan
Dylan to dorm down in
lush Malibu mrishmash'

MALIBU, Calif. (AP) - Perched high
above the cliffs of Malibu looms a sprawl-
ing architectural wonder that a building
inspector calls a "terrible mishmash," but
Bob Dylan soon will call it home.
The dwelling - part ranch house, part
castle - reportedly is costing the singer-
songwriter nearly $2 million. Dozens of arti-
sans and craftsmen have worked several
years to give it a folksy, handcrafted ap-
pearance.
A HUGE ONION-SHAPED dome protrud-
es from the center section, creating the
impression that "someone dropped a clump
of ice cream," according to one neighbor.
"The dome originally was going to be
an eagle's nest, you know, just a little hide-
away," said architect Dave Towbin, who has
been in on the project since it started sev-
eral years ago. "Then it was going to be
an observatory, then something else, and
now it's an onion-shaped copper dome."
Towbin' says the place has "taken on
several new directions," - an architect's
way of saying it has been rebuilt more
times than he can, count.
"BUT I THINK the house hangs togeth-

er pretty well for the form it is," he said.
"It's kind of hard to put a label on it, but
I guess I'd call it stick-and-timber eclec-
tic.'
A Los Angeles County building inspector
termed it "a terrible mishmash."
In the back, Dylan has constructed a huge
polymorphous pool, with plenty of room for
his five kids and their friends. "It's a lake,"
one observer noted.
THE PROJECT started out as a $50,000
remodeling of a house that once belonged
to a Los Angeles Times columnist, said
Towbin, "but then the thing began to grow
and grow and grow, and a lot of things be-
gan to change. Sarah, Dylan's wife, gotin-
volved in the project, very involved, and
then .
"Let's just say there were a lot of major
changes, mainly because it had to feel
right."
Whatever Dylan's Malibu creation is, he
can be sure there's nothing like it any-
where in the world.
"It's kind of unreal," said one Malibu
resident of his famous neighbor's new home,
"But if he can stand it, I can."

- "A WHIFF OF the Past."'
An enterprising New Yorker has
been selling bottles of air he
claims was captured on July 4,
1776 and saved for posterity.
The green, apparently hand-
blown bottles, have been retail-
ing for $50 each.
-Crafty Ideas. The selling
of nonexistent space for Bicen-
tennial arts and crafts exhibi-
tions to persons who wish to EVER
display some of their works and
skills in colonial crafts.
Kalmar has been compiling DA I
the information on con games
for a bank-sponsoredproject-
the Slick Swindles Education
Program - established to en-
THE ONEJ
THE REI
3 POLE

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artistic writinq?
Ifyou are interest-
j poetry, and music
or writing feature
stories about the
drama, dance, film
arts: Contact Arts
Editor, c/o The
Michigan Dair.

The story goes that this guy walke.d
into a college bookstore and bought a
calculator that worked backwards,
or sideways, or something.
But once he got the hang of it,
he found that Reverse Polish Notation
meant he worked with only two numbers
at a time, solving the most complex
sequence calculations quickly,

accurately and naturally.
The machine of all these and many
other marvels is the Model 4510
(the "Mathematician") from National
Semiconductor. Suggested retail
under $25.
And that's no joke.
2 National Semiconductor

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WELCOMES BACK THE
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IT IS APITY FOR YOU CLASSES
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We Wish You a
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