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December 02, 1976 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday December 2, 1975

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, December 2, 1976

'U' slip pin' into darkness

GEO approves contract vote

MIDNITE MADNESS
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(Continued from Page 1) "No, I'm not a ghost," he whis-' Student Activities Building, van-
can't pay them now." pered - but he refused to give ished from the air waves for an
The moods in the dorms was , his name. hour.
jovial as candle-toting students Not everyone, however, was Meanwhile, merchants at the
crept slowly up and down halls, finding the darkness enjoyable. Union closed down their estab-'
tossing snowballs, pulling fire Chicago House Resident Direc- lishments for safety reasons,
alarms, and engaging in other tor Sheila Sandubrae warned ,and employes roamed the build-,
forms of residence hall shena- the women on her floor to stay ing with flashlights and decor1
nigans. in their rooms and' lock the' candles purloined from dinner
S T U D E N T S W I 'T H doors, or travel the halls with table at the University Club.
flashlights provided an escort friends. "JUST THINK OF how much
service for those without illu- "IT COULD be dangerous if money we'i'e losing," one Uni-'
mination, and scarce battery- any type of pathological people 1 versity Cellar employe joked
run radios were a popular at- are around," she said. "Like from behind the Cellar's lockedi
traction. muggers rapists, theieves." door.
In the eerie hallway of West In the Student Publications doojust pulled into the parking
Quad, one student was convinc- Building on Maynard, Michigan structure and that's when it
ed the end was near. "We may Daily members were startled turned as black as the ace of
be entering the Twilight Zone," when the clattering of wire ma- spades," said Jim Hilton, assist-
he said. "Only one room will chines came to a silent stand- ,ant general manager of the'i
be lit, and a lone stereo play- still, and severalireporters Union.I
ing." scrawled their stories by can-
Like some character in a Vin- dlelight. The darkness failed to
cent Price horror film, a lone disrupt the composition of this *
man sat softly playing the piano morning's newspaper. But ra- P 1ercc V
in a quiet, pitch-black lounge. dio station WCBN, housed in the

(Continued from Page 1) according to Forsyth, has not
t "Our lawyer says we've got yet received notice from MERC
them cold," Moran said. on the unfair labor practice, it
Meanwhile, Chief University is not yet considering it serious-
Bargainer John Forsyth main-
tains "They're going to lose "I doubt whether they've even
at MERC" because the griev- filed it," Forsyth said.
ance concerns an article defin- "I BELIEVED them initially
ing who is protected under the - when they (GEO) first an-
contract and is therefore a le- nounced it - but I'm suspicious
gitimate bargaining issue. ' now." he added.

"WE'RE WILLING to renego- Responding to the charge that
tiate that article," said For- the University is trying to break
syth. the union, Forsyth said, "If we
if rE tinue to refe were trying to bust them lord

Martin D-18

$700.00

t

further negotiations, holds For-
syth, the University will hinge
the settlement on the arbitra-
tion decision.
Because the Administration,
count bld

knows we've had many oppor-
tunities in the past."
And though union activists
are anxious to sign a contract
and collectcdues, Moran said
the union can survive nonethe-
less.
"WE CAN GET loans from
MFT. (Michigan Federation of
Teachers, the parent union),"
he said- 4Thev have never let

Accessories-20% OFF from 10-11
ACipo o

ratify their own 'contract' but
they still won't have a contract
with the University."
At the union, meeting, mem-
ity opinion cautioning ratifica-
tion would only freeze the posi-
tions of the contract as it now
stands and then give the Univer-
sity little incentive to settle
early.
THE MAJORITY of GSA's
who gathered for the meeting
in the, Rackham Amphitheatre
felt the University could be
spurred into agreement by
pressure after the contract
terms are approved by the
membership.
"This action will not affect
our unfair labor practice (pro-
ceedings)," said GEO bargain-
er Susan Van Alstyne to the
group. "In fact it will strength-
en it beca,4se it -shows we've
bargained in good faith to get a
contract."
One GEO steward from the
School of Education says the
pressure has already begun to
mount. "A number of faculty
members in the education school
have contacted the administra-
tion because they consider this
last move by the University
bargainers as an unfair labor
practice. He further encourag-
ed the members preseut to urge
the faculty in their departments
to do the same.
F O R S Y T H, meanwhile,
said, "All I can say myself is I
have not had one call yet."
All GEO card - holding mem-
bers - even those who have not
paid their fall term dues - are
being called on to cast their
ballots in the four day ratifica-
tion vote beginning tomorrow.

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769.1400

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11G lu.A. y. 1 d VG 11 V
mmmm mmmm mmm mmmm a eone of their unions go bankrupt
due to employers financial at-
HOLIDAY CAKES rejected by Kell tacks on them."
But GEO does not want to
Custom Design your Holiday Cake (Continued from Page 1) "We would much rather get find out tie long termn reper-
Canvassers asking for a recount, the thing taken care of on the cussions. It wants a contract
WE'LL DO THE BAKING . . . but the petitions were rejected'state level, so we don't have now.
YOU DO THE EATING!! because of the 1974 Kelley opin-,to get the U.S. House of Rep- Last night's vote to start a
ion that Congress had sole au- resentatives to step in," he said. referendum for ratification of;
thoritv over disputed congres- THE DOCUMENTS filed w hat they claim is, in fact, a
as Yae tisTHE C EssSaree iahro-comnlete contract signaled the
S ug a i . B kery sioHastings conceded that there hcedgral step keeping open startsofeathni e s t into
corner of LIBERTY and MAIN were difficulties involved in get- Pierce's option to ask for a press ire the University into
300 S. MAIN 761-7532 ting legislation passed: the state congressional recount. Pursell agreement promptly.
┬░alegislative session will expire reportedly is consulting attor- "R A T I F I C A T I 0 N
i- --n - - about two weeks and the bill neys to formulate a response is intended to show that our
would need Republican support. to the notice of contest. membership is serious that this
But he said it is the favored Pierce also is prepared for any is the contract and we want to
route. legal action necessary, Hast- sign it," said Moran.
VOTE TODAY ings said. B u t Forsyth countered,
ALL NEW 1 "We're going to pursue it on! "They're ratifying something
HARDCOVER BOOKS every possible legal front," he that has not even been agreed
a a An o FFsaid. to vet They can go ahead and

MIDNIGHT MADNESS
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POLLS ACROSS

CAMPUS

ter pont reflects on years
at 'U, ponders its future
(Continued from Page 1) ces, and I have some real ques- AFTER SERVING in the
coming slowly to its end. tions about whether or not Navy during World War II,
that's going to continue. And. Pierpont returned to Ann Arbor
AND PIERPONT recognizes- we had a great growth of the! to teach accounting. He was
perhaps better than anyone else campuses - the North Campus made controller in 1947, and
can - the changes taking place and the physical facilities - became Vice President- and
around him. It does not make and we're about done with that, Chief Financial Officer in 1951
him rage against the darkness, we're not going to need it any- through what he calls "a piece
though; his eyes sparkle as he more." of luck."
remembers the past or traces INSTEAD, Pierpont sees a He is a profoundly humorous
the lines of the future. period of "stability" during man; few things escape his dry
"Nobody has lived through which the University will have wit or his laughter. And when
more of a Golden Era of higher to conserve its resources and he speaks about the University
education than I have," he find new ways of raising money. he uses, a curiously personal
says, "no matter where you "The financial crunch which frame of reference: it is, after
are, what university you're in. is hitting all 1higher education all, his old friend of many win-
Those twenty years from 1950 is going to hit us differently," ters.
to 1970, they were a great time. he says. "In fact, we're going "I think the University can
But the conditions of growth to be one of the most vulnerable adapt; I think it will adapt. It'd
will not occur again in the next institutions. This means we're 'a very strong university. There
10 years. going to have to be more alert always have been hard times
"We had great growth in the to the kind of financial resour- here - there was never a time
number of our students, which ces we can obtain, more alert when there was enough money
we're not going to see anymore. to how we sort out our priori- to go around, and I don't think
There was a great growth of ties." there ever will be.
financial support from all sour- Pierpont was born March 15,
1-14 in Winn, a small town near "I THINK IT'S GOT inertia
the center of the Lower Pe- of its own, sere - but in the
erninshMa. He went to schoolinright sense of the word," he
nearby Mt. Pleasant, and earn- svs. "Tt flows like the Missis-
ed a BA from Central Michigan ;nni River. And it bends, you'
University in 1934. In 1936, he G know: it moves. It's affected by
enrolled here and took his MBA each
w and PhD at the Business School, each generation of faculty. And

- I
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to the extent that any large or-
ganization of this kind can ac-
knowledge the interests of in-
dividuals, I think it's done a
Ipretty fair job."
Throughout his career, Pier-
Pont has worked to decentralize
the operations o fthe University
toward those ends.
"It seems to me the art of
managing an institution of this
kind is to keep it as flexible, as
horizontal and as loose as is pos-
sible and still have some ac-
countability."
FLEXIBILITYwas
a major consideration during
the student unheavals of the Six-
ties, and Pierpqnt remembers
them well.
"I think the University re-
snonded to it very well," he
says of the student protest
movement. "I think it's a bet-
ter University than we had 10
years ago because of it."
He says dissent is "a pretty
good idea -- but there has to
be some humor and some pro-
oriety about it. You know,
Ssnrmetimes I've criticized the
University's actions, too."
WHEN FE STEPS DOWN at
the end of the month, Piernont's
nlace will be taken by James
Prinkerhoif of the University of
Minnesota - a man who work-
ed closely with him here for
many years and who has been
called a "Piernont protege."
He is confident of Brinker-
] hoff's ability to manage the
University's finances, and con-
fident the University itself will
weather its uncertain future.
"It's easy for an old man to
sit back and criticize the way
thines are going," he says.
"Bat I'm not quite ready to do
that - I'm not an old man yet."
10 CARDS?

. 1.

111U

I

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