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December 01, 1976 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-12-01

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, December 1, 1976

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, December 1, 1976

I

11

DECIDING ON
A LAW CAREER?

0

L

INFORMATION NIGHT
THURSDAY, DEC. 2-7:30 P.M.
AUDITORIUM B, ANGELL HALL

i
i

By LIZ SLOWIK
When James Veneris dies, send him no flow-
ers. All he asks is that you take his ashes, throw
him to the Yellow River in China and call it quits.
Veneris, who spoke at the Union last night, has
spent the last 23 years in a town 800 miles south
of Peking. He was captured by the Chinese in the
Korean War.
"REALLY I WAS LIBERATED," said Veneris
in a raspy voice, the product of 120 lectures and
44 television appearances in the last four months.
"I came here to visit my mother and classmates,
and here I am. The reception of the American
people has been very good."
Back in China, Veneris is a factory worker,
supervising the recycling of used paper shoes into
toilet paper to be exported to Hong Kong. He works
an eight-hour day, followed by a rap session with
other workers on problems and how to improve
working conditions.
"When I worked in the steel mills, in Penn-
sylvania," he said, "the first thing I saw was a
guard with a black suit, a gun, and a club. At
our factory, we have no guards like this."
VENERIS DESCRIBED his stints in the U.S.
Army during World War II and the Korean War.
He told about the lands of Korea flattened by bombs
and the stench of dead bodies piled between moun-
tains.

Ex-U.S. POW tells of life in China

"It looked like a wax museum, that's how- many
bodies there were," he said.
He was captured with two other soldiers by the
Chinese.
"They treated us well," he said. "The winter
was 42 degrees below zero and they gave us cot-
ton-padded clothes and we were warm. We had
Recreation committees, sports committees. We had
lots of 'holidays - Christmas, -Thanksgiving, Chi-
nese National Holiday. We had good food."
The conditions of the treaty that ended the Korean
War gave the prisoners of war a.chance to return
to America or to stay in China.
"THE AMERICAN PEOPLE gave me the chance
to go to China," he explained. "When I saw the
flat land in Korea - not a house, not a hospital,
not a school was standing - I began to wonder.
We were supposed to liberate the Korean people.
I saw American soldiers driving trucks purposely
run into old Koreans and break their legs. I gave
a roll call one day in the POW camp. Rockefeller,
DuPont - they weren't there. And then I began
to see."
Veneris said that changes have probably come
to China since the death of Mao Tse-tung.
"The society will move forward," he continued.
"The Chinese people struggled for 6,000 years. Now
they're eating sweets and if you give them a bit-
ter pill, what will they do? They'll reject it. The

struggle is good because the society is moving
forward."
Often Veneris gathers with fellow workers to
discuss political theory. "The whole country is
electrified. I want to live to 120 to see every-
thing that happens," he said.
Veneris lives with his second wife and six chil-
dren. His oldest daughter is 25, engaged to be
married, next year, and wants to become a bus
driver.
"In China, a woman can do anything a man
does for equal wages and she is respected," he
said proudly.
Dressed in a conservative blue suit over a royal
blue Chinese vest, Veneris pulled out the red cov-
er from one of Chairman Mao's books. Veneris
uses the cover as a wallet.
"I wasn't supposed to take this out of the coun-
try," he confided. Then he fondled a Chinese ten
dollar bill, worth about seven American dollars.
"This will feed ny family for a week. I don't
want to -lose it."
Veneris is on a six-month paid leave of absence
from his job. He plans to return to China in Janu-
ary, after more appearances in the U.S. He will
spend a few days in Peking upon his return to
rest after his eventful return to his homeland.
Veneris' speech was sponsored by the U.S.-China
Peoples Friendship Association of Ann Arbor and
the China Study Club, a Chinese student group.

CAREER

Information on:

Law School

Preparation

Planning t
Placement
764-7460

Law School- Admissions
Law School Environment
Sponsored by Pre-Professional Office

--- -- -

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Teamsters expelled by police group
(Continued from Page 1) "In a period of time, the DETROIT POLICE Officers l AM expected to enter the field,
Washtenaw County Sheriff's POAM is going to be almost Association President Jim Van- Vand.evender feels that there
Deputy Raymond Zakrzewski, non-functional. If it fails, (PO devender, also a member of is a "very, very good possibili-
Teamsters Union steward for AM Director) Carl Parsell is the POAM Executive Board dis-, ty" that many of these depart-
Sheriff's patrol officers, charged out of a job," Zakrzewski said, agreed. He said he expects the ments will decide to switch to
that the move to make POAM and attributed Parsell's 'efforts Association to gain bargaining POAM representation.
a full - service union is an ef- to move POAM toward full un- rights in many police depart- "I SEE A FIGHT - a fight
fort by Association leadership ion, status as attempts as "self- ments which are "trying to stay to represent police officers,"
to keep a foundering organiza- survival." away from the Teamster's said POAM Executive Director
tion afloat. "At present, it has not been gangsterist image," Carl Parsell.
"THE POAM has nothing shown that full service is in "I don't like the big brother "We're not going to go out
really to offer" most police of- demand" by POAM member concept," Vandevender stated and convince people to quit the
ficers, Zakrzewski said. .Zakr- organizations; Zakrzewski said. which he said the Teamster's Teamsters Union. We're going
zewski served as a member of He stated that he expects the Union represents. to notify those units that we're
the POAM Executive Board un- full union service scheme to be "Most small police depart- in business. We're hanging out
til the Teamsters expulsion rejected by POAM's January ments went with the Teamsters the shingle. The Teamsters are
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Name
Address

Korean may defect
(Continued from Page 1) able to the South Korean gov-
The source explained that ernment.
Kim was allowed to change Reports have indickted that
his visa ' status here in return as many as 90 lawmakers could
for cooperation with the Jus- be involved. The State Depart-
tice Department investigation ment declined comment on the
into allegations of influence report of Kim's request for
buying on Capitol Hill. asylum.
THE PROBE involves alle- One source said he believed
gations that congressmen were Kim was the second ranking
slipped money or provided with member of the Korean. Central
favors in an effort to sway Con- Intelligence Agency mission in
gress to adopt policies favor- ! Washington.

VOTE TODAY
MSA-UHC Election
POLLS ACROSS CAMPUS

City

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SAUL
MARANTZ
Thursday
tiy
December 2
2-4 P.m.
There's hardly an audiophile anywhere who doesn't know
about the state-of-the-art equipment Mr. Marantz produced.
This includes such classics as the model 7 pre-amp, 10B
tuner, and the model 9 and 8B amplifiers. Today this
equipment demands many times its original cost.
Saul Marantz is now president of Dahlquist Corporation,
which produces the classic Dahlquist DQ-10 phase arrayed
speaker system. Mr:"Marantz will be on hand to introduce
four important new products and accessories that will
add considerably to your listening enjoyment. Included
are a remarkable subwoofer system and two crossover
units, electronic and passive. Also available is an attractive
stand for the popular Dahlquist DQ-10 loudspeaker,
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Ann Arbor
Berkley ....
Clawson .. , ... .

175 North Maple Street
1833 Coolidge Highway
309 North Main Street

Lincoln Park , .4064 Fort Street
Livonia . 27526 Grand River Avenue
Livonia....... ..34110 Plymouth

Royal Oak' ........ 2214 East 11 Mile Road
St. Clair Shores . .. . 23825 Harper Avenue
Taylor ............. 21399 Van Born Road

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