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November 20, 1976 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, November 20; 197

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

PAID ADVERTISEMI

ENT

AWAITS BIG BLUE:
Columbus turns crimson

MARTIN CALLED BEST
NEW YORK (AP) - Even
though Lou Piniella fails to play
regularly with the New York
Yankees, the 32-year-old Tam-
pa,, Fla., outfielder calls Yan-
kP.PL iiiwias illv Mrtin I th L.

(Continued from Page 1)
BUT MOST FANS are simply1
interested in being boisterous
and having a good time.
"Whether they win or lose,
people will go crazy," said an-
other Papa Joe's patron. "If
they lose, everyone will be!
pissed off and get rowdy; if
they win, it will be becausea
everybody is so happy." 1
Papa Joe's is one of several1
Columbus bars whose social life
begins and ends with the word
"football." Students jam theI
small dance floor, sit at long;
wooden tables, drink beer outl
of buckets, and chant "Go
Bucks" and "Ohio" between!
songs played at peak volume;
from speakers on the balcony.:
Among the graceful little dit-
ties are "Go, Buckeyes, Go,"
(which you probably know as
"Johnny B. Goode), and "One,,
Two, Three, It's More Than a
Game to Me," (which you will'
recognize as Country Joe Mac-
Donald's "Feel-Like-I'm-Fixin'-"
To-Die Rag. You figure it out.)
LAST NIGHT, students insider
the bar danced on the tables'
while students outside waited in!

thgt none of them has quite himself to a mob of about 3,000 best manager ins eall."
learned 'to operate the thing Buckeye diehards. The rally
yet. N was supposed to end with the "I've been watching Martin
"Yeah, we do this annually," burning of two Michigan play- manage since he began in 1968
said 'Joe Bianchi, as someone ars in effigy, but the straw with Denver when I played
in the back of tie van yelled, dummies were ripped limb from with Portland in the Pacific
"No, not that button, that's the limb by the ,crowd before the Coast League. Then when I was
refrigerator." dummies made it to the fire. with Kansas City, Bill managed
"We're all from the 'same Only an odd arm or two made Minnesota, Detroit and Texas
neighborhood," chimed in John it to the fire. They done Woody and always got the most out
Eccardt, who was seated in proud. of his players."
front of several cases of beer. -
'6We're all sports nuts." The
Chicagoans got their tickets e ia
through a friend; thole who pay
ling out anywhere from $20 to'
$50 a ticket. "I know a girl who. -it r
sold four together for $2S0," Pn
claimed one sophomore.
SO AFTER ALL the hoopla (Continued from Page 1)
is over, who will win the big (r Heights, and University Hospi-
one? and with whom you will be. tal's main entrance; and the
"OSU by two, because they're * Stay in lighted areas. Michigan League at the corner
playing at home," said Eccardt. i Do not hitchhike at any time, of Norh versity and Fletch
"Ohi Stte y tree da or niht.er. The bus will continue to
"Ohio State by three - I ay or nigt.Church Street before returning
hope," ventured a woman at 0 Do not associate with strang- Churhe enbeore retury.
Papa Joe's. ers. to the Undergraduate Library.
"MICHIGAN by at least six 0 If you are accosted, scream,
or seven," said a student be- run, kick but above all, do not Be sure
tween mugfuls. let the individual get you into
ani b u nhiuL Mu1JeflItn kv+rfr Ui n

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But whoever wins, there's no
doubt that M-OSU is the big-

a line which stretched down the gest thing ever to hit Colum-'
block. Carloads of drunks drove bus - since M-OSU two years

up and down streets honking
horns, and one even tried to,
lead cheers among pedestrians
with a loadspeaker connected to
his CB radio.
One of the strangest 'events
around town'last night was at
the Holiday Inn, which is a
three-minute walk. from . the
Stadium and has been booked
solid for this weekend since
May. All the alumni gather'
there, dressed head to foot in,
scarlet and gray and talking
about the great Ohio-Michigan
clashes of eons ago:,"
"I've been coming to these
games for 28 years," said H.D.
Carter, a veterinarian from In-x
diana ard an OSU alumnus.
"That's probably longer than
you've even been around."
NOT ALL the alumni are in'
the hotels. One group of five
Chicagoans, two of them 1972
OSU grads, rented a camper
and have made it their home'
for the weekend despite the fact1

ago, that is.
gLastnight our hall in the
dorm streaked," announced one$
student. "We got what, we call,
a 'bugle, brigade' - one guy,
blows a bugle and plays the,
Ohio State song, and everybody
jest goes running around."
THE WINDOWS in most dorms
are taned over with anti-Michi-
gan slogans, each competing
for the eyes of passers-by and
ABC television, 'and it resem-
bles nothing so much as a gi-
gantic, vertical game of Scrab-
ble. Every fraternity and so-{
rority - and there are dozens
of them, pillared and in neat
rows - boast slogans and ban-
ners.
There have been snake danc-
es, ."Scarlet and Gray" Days,"
and parties. It all culminated
last night in a bonfire and ay
ppp rally at Ohio Stadium.
"Regardless of what UPI
says, we're number one in your
hearts," shouted The Fat Man
.r

an auiomoone. maze sure you
get the license number of the
vehicle if there is a vehicle in-
volved.
0 Do not accept rides with per-
sons whom you know to be drug
abusers or their associates.
* If a questionable or suspic-
ious situation arises, call the
police immediately. Do not wait
until you get home or get to
your destination. If possible,!
write down a description of the'
individual, including any out-
standing characteristics or
marks.
OXFORD Housing resident;
Virenda Nath, who has been
working for over a year to es-I
tablish the bus system, said, "I'
really feel good. It's taken a
long time. Maybe when you go
to the central powers, you do
get a response."
"But it takes such a price,"
he added, referring to the crisis;
which provoked the new bus'
system. "It's discouraging, but
there's hope."
Ann Arbor Police Chief Wal-
ter Krasny is also optimistic.
"If, people will use it, it will
help. The importanttthingwis
it's available and they should
take advantage of, it. I know it
gives a little peace of mind to
people and to families. It is an
effort to show that it's not go-I
ing to goaway until we catch
the guy," he said.
Bus stops on the "Nite Owl"
route are: Undergraduate Lib-
rary; Hill Street at Tappan,
East. University, Olivia, and
Washtenaw; Washtenaw atI
Cambridge; Cambridge at Hill;
Oxford at Geddes; Observatory
at S to c kw e l l,Washington!

to dU i UYV
fi-res.

Please:help prevent forest fires.
PT
guest Artist Sries -
* b u*
* VIA CS $
Nov 2324.26,27- 8pm
* Nov28-2&8pm
PowerCeniter 4('
cot..., e .'LootM . 10-1 2-5
Ci ,*
* . '~. a .~f 4

Old friends and familiar
the Village Bell.
Yes, there really is a restaurant of class and elegance within
walking distance of central campus. You may not know it, you
may pass by it every day, perhaps even having ventured inside
for soup or a sandwich. The restaurant is the Village, Bell, the
traditional campus barrelhouse beerhall up front, which, in
the downstairs, between the hours of five and nine, is perhaps
one of Ann Arbor's classiest establishments within reasonable
price.
The "V-Bell"'s restaurant is a new addition, the idea being
to offer all the style- of .an expensive restaurant with prices
within the student's pocketbook range. As "Bell" nanager
Chris Barecki puts it, "we're concerned with what's carried us
-and it's the students who've carried us for the nine years
we've been open." Not that everyone's not welcome, Mr.
Barecki is quick to add, noting that the Village Bell's location
(right on South University) and its reputation as a beerhall
makes the V-Bell's patrons primarily students.

surroundings-tradition lives on at

village
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The catering to this natural student cilentele is reflected
first in the wine list.
Prices range from $3.00 to $17.00 per bottle, but even the
highest priced bottle is a bargain. The wine you order with
dinner is priced at retail rather than the usual restaurant price.
This means a bottle 'of Chateau Margaux costing $42.50 in an
exclusive downtown restaurant goes for just $16.94 at the Bell.
No exorbidant profits here, their motto being that even
struggling students should be able to aford a good wine..
After settling on a Zinfandel rose (California 1974), my
cohort and I were treated to the Bell's pride and joy, the clam
chowder. And their pride at "Abner's own" is not unwarranted,
for nowhere can a better chowder be found. The Bell takes
pride in that even New Englanders must compliment the chef,
who keeps his recipe secret even from the manager.
Instead of the chowder, a salad bar' is an alternative. For
$3.50, you are allowed as many refills as possible from the
varied selections. Or you can enjoy the salad bar for just a
dollar with anything on the menu-ANYthing, including bread-
so it's possible to make it a meal in itself,
The main course offers just as wide a selection, for all
tastes and prices. Three "plank dinners," prime rib, New
York strip, or a "catch of the day" are the Village Bell tradi-
tions. Sirloin, shrimp creole, and spaghetti help round out the
menu. Of course, for something a little lighter, there is the
"Bell A'Carte" side, offering a steak sandwich or a burger.
For dessert, there is cheesecake, ice cream, or, for just a
DOWNTOWN
~i~4~s114 E. Washington

dollar twenty-five (the price of a good sundae) there is the
infamous "Hell's Bell's," a take-off on cherries jubilee. Pitted
cherries, a juice of the chef's own secret recipe, and 151 proof
rum top vanilla ice cream. The delicacy is set ablaze on your
plate, leaving "Dell's Bell's" with a rum flavor distinctively
its own.
The die-hard beer-lovers can relax; the Village Bell still
has its bar downstairs, infamous for its wide selection of beers.
And the V-Bell isn't without its specials: Sunday, all bottle beer
drops below a dollar, even for Heineken-a mere pittance;
Monday is "pitcher, night'!-and anyone who's enjoyed the brew
at Bell's can attest to the fact that theirs is, at 68 ounces, the
largest pitcher in town; Boilermaker night is Tuesday-you buy
the boze and the beer's on the Bell; and to top it off, there's
a big discount on any drink Wednesday from 9:00 to 11:30.
The waitresses are both charming and personable, there's
no waiting, and even the music serves to mellow the mood.
Carpeted ceilings lend the old brick archways an atmosphere
of elegance. In fact, the only complaint about the Village Bell
restaurant downstairs is that no one knows it's there.

ANN ARBOR
DANCE THEATER'S

8:3O p.m.

Nov. 19 & 20
at DANCE SPACE

FALL 3141 S
State St.
DANCE$2at the door
refreshments
PERFRMANE t d ( served after each
PERFORMANCE -... efrac
performance
02 As Ann Arbor s
CAKE SPECIALIST,
We'll get the Cake delivered as you
want it, fresh, intact, and on time.
Whether it is to DETROIT, NEW
YORK, or SAN FRANCISCO ...
ask us about
TELE-CAKES.
SUGAR BIN BAKERY 41
300 S. Main 761-7532
at the corner of Liberty & Main
.iyr ~. .. .. a L .rJ.a,1 .. , ... 4aJ. .4w.~..~.*...i ,M
$2.50 Student Ticketsj
available for the
,Opera production of
Robert Ward's
BASED ON
Arthur Miller's play
NOV. 18-21-8 P.M. /

w
- -

665-3231

Now

0.

BICYCLE JIM'S
Featuring DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES, and now
FROZEN YOGURT!
Happy Hour Mon-Fri. 3-6
OPEN: M-Th until 12 and
F-Sat. until 2
Sun. until 10
1301 S. UNIVERSITY

665 2650

Complete Italia"-American Menu
ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET DINNERS

WEDS.
SEAFOOD BUFFET
Adults-$4.95
Children-$2.99

SUNDAY
ITALIAN BUFFET
Adults-$3.49
Children-$1.49

- -

Chinese;
Casual Din
Carry-out
- Banquet F

3020 Packard
(at Platt)

THE LORD FOX
ANN ARBOR'S FINEST DINING-
We offer a very wide selection of fresh seafood items,
a distinguished wine list and cellar, tableside des-
serts, and tasteful service in a picturesque country
setting.

and Korean Cuisine.
ing Room 911-6442

Service
Facil ities

HOURS:
M-S: 12-2 p.m.
5-9 p.m.
Closed Sunday

5400 PLYMOUTH ROAD

668-9387

's

AP Photo
Hei ht of fashion
The denim trade, along with everything else, has evident-
ly been hit by, inflation. But at Cameron Balloons in Bris-
tol, England, inflation is a good thing. These over-sized jeans
are a promotional gimmick for Levis in Holland.
R.C. PLAYERSpresent

llefzer~
HOURS: Wed., Thurs., Fri.,
Saturday 4-10 p.r
Sunday 11:30a.m
Closed Mon-Tues

203 E.
WASHINGTON
NO 8-8987
IMPORTED AND
DOMESTIC
BEERS. WINES &
COCKTAILS

The worlds fin(
~domestic and
3j~ imported wines
reasonable priC
"1 > .1321 S.
University
,--__769-1744

lest

e.

4 p.m.-m
n- 8p.m.

idnight

Is

Pirandelto's
(IF YOU
THINK SO)
Directed by

PRETZEL BELL

t .1w ri uir rr ar rr

DINING OUT

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