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November 18, 1976 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-11-18

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Page fight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, November 18, 1976

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, November 18, 1976

UAW,
By AP and UPI
The United Auto Workers
(UAW) ratified a new three-
year pact covering 118,000f
Chrysler Corp. workers late
last night, with skilled trades-1
men approving the contract byI
a narrow margin.
UAW Vice--President Doug-
las Fraser, the chief union ne-
gotiator at Chrysler, said he
was "relieved" after a day-'
long counting of the ballots.
"I WISH I could say what'
caused the large number of1
negative votes," Fraser said.
"Obviously, it's something
we're going to have to work
Son."

Chiysler reach accord

Police press hunt

36 candidates vie
for MISA positions

Fraser said Chrysler's skill-;
ed tradesmen, who held veto
power over the accord, approv-
ed the contract by 622 'votes,;
5,865 to 5,243. Production work-
ers approved the pact 33,555 to
18,862.
Salaried employes overwhelm-
ingly ratified a separate agree-a
ment they have with Chrysler,
Fraser said. A total of 118,000a
U. S. and Canadian workers arej
covered by the agreement,'
which was reached Nov. 5.

Motors Corp. (GM) where'
390,000 workers at 117 plants
in 21 states are poised to strike
at 12:01 a.m. EST Friday.
Union officials warned the
auto giant to "step up" the pace
of negotiations if it wants to
avert a walkout. Bargaining
teams met late into the eve-E
ning yesterday, with the UAW
claiming only minor progress.
"In all of Wednesday's nego-
tiations, only a small number
of issues have been resolved
and the pace of negotiations

APPROVAL of the Chrysler seems to have slowed down
pact left the way clear for the somewhat," said UAW Vice
union to concentrate on General President Irving Bluestone, the

li

PHIIPS C

chief union negotiator at GM.
A union source said the two1
sides still had sufficient time
to settle before the strike dead- (Continued from Page 1)
line, toward safety," he explained.
A strike at GM would be "And many people are upset,!
unprecedented since the UAW frightened, distraught and rath-
has never struck two auto com- er sympathetic to the victims.
panies in a single negotiating "OTHERS FEEL it is the Uni-
year since in the mid-1950s versity's responsibility to be-
when it began the "target" stra- versity's re littoff-am
tegy of dealing with one auto cause we are located off-cam-
company at a time. Ford was pus to provide some transpor-
closed for 28 days to set this tation," Lazaroff added.
year's pattern agreement and Foulke was an originator of
Chrysler matched the pact with the escort service but said he
its tentative contract just 10 actually favors the kind of bus'
minutes before a strike dead- service that the students want.
line on Nov. 5. "This escort service won'tI
take the place of a bus serv-
ice," he said. "There will be'
delays - officers will be taking
a report someplace and people!
will have to wait." He also said!
that officers will be taken from
their regular patrols so that
their regular jobs will take
second priority.
"I WOULD support an all-
night-long bus system. Theie isk
an existing bus system. It just
doesn't go to the right places.'
But if you're going to have a
bus system, you must look into
fees, and ridership."
But Foulke, who stated re-,
peatedly that he was not in a
decision - making position, also
tried to warn students that the
University cannot do every-
thing.
"The University can buffer
and can help but your personal
security is your personal re-
sponsibility," he said, to an
audience, outraged by what ap-
,S LIED VON DER ERDE peared to them to be evasive-
mes King; Concertgebouw ness.
ard Haitink. "We've been trying to get
this bus service for over a:

ON

Stephanie Tyiska, frustrated by
the run around the University (Continued from Page )
has been giving her by send- hour a day' presence in the line
ing her from one office to an- would be required.
other. 4 Limited Block (with modi-
"Who is the University-some fications) - same as above with
machine in the sky that you individuals representing up to
have to get a special pass to 40 others for events held in
converse with?" added Viren- Michigan Stadium.
dra Nath another Oxford resi-

rapist

I ..... :s: x

ASALE
OUR ENTIRE STOCK
OF 1.98 LIST PHILLIPS
IMPORTS ON SALE AT

dent director.
WORRIED THAT the Univer-
sity would cite a lack of funds
as reason for refusing a bus
system, one student said, "How
can they justify a commuter
during the day? If they can
justify that, then how can they
not justify this?"
One woman thought she had'
the perfect plan to force the
University to comply with her
demands.
"We can get a newspaper to,
say how unsafe it is to live at
Oxford, then people won't want
to live at Oxford and then the
University will lose money. It's,
economically unfeasible 'for the
University if people do not live
at Oxford."
STUDENTS did come up with
some immediate day-to-day sol-
utions and some long range
plans aimed at getting the bus
system. They circulated a peti-
tion to be sent to Vice-Presi-
dent of Student Services Henry
Johnson and volunteers offered
to meet with him today.
They also discussed possible
methods of walking unions,
where male students woukl be
available to escort women stu-

RODRIGO: FANTASIA PARA UN GEN-
Ti LHOMBRE
GIULIANI: INTRODUCTION, THEME
WITH VARIATIONS AND POLONAISE,
OP. 65
Pepe Romero; Academy of St. Martin-
in-the-Fields/Neville Marriner.
9500.042

499

* Unlimited Block system -
similar to the other two block
systems, but block representa-
tives may represent groups of
any size.
* No Block System-only one'
line. Each person may repre-.
sent four others.
The result of the vote on this
referendum will not be binding.
MSA will use student concensus
to establish the new ticket poli-
cy.
The election also marks the
first time in two years that the
Student Organizing Committee
(SOC), a well-known campus:
political party, will not appear1
on the ballot. Several current
members of MSA, including Lu-
ker and Vice-president Amy
Blumenthal ran as members of
SOC in past elections.
LUKER OFFERED two rea-
sons for the disbanding of SOC,
"We feel too much time in stu-
dent government is spent fight-
ing within student government,
not uniting to fight the admin-
istration."
"Also," Luker said, "We feel
that central student government
in general is not the best forum
for making change within the
University."
Among the 36 candidates for
the nine full-year and two half-
year terms are members of six
different political parties. Seven
candidates are running inde-
pendently.
CAMPUS COALITION and
Make Our Votes Effective
(MOVE) have appeared on bal-
lots in previous elections and
currently hold MSA seats. The
Committee Against Mandatory
Funding, The Voluntary Fund-
ing Party,. Students for Reform,
and the Bullshit Party are new-
comers to the ballot.

Campis 'olition member
Laskey says his party is a basi-
-ally -moderate group which
stresses stident rights. "We
feel very strongly that student
gowernment is giving up con-
trol to the administration,"
Lnskev s.id.
MOVE spokesman Pete Vogl
stressed his party's past MSA
achievements saying, "MOVE's
objective is to provide students
with services, funding for stu-
dent organizations ... students
should have a part in making
policy which effects them."
TWO PARTIES are campaign-
ing against the possible new
constitution. Stewart Mandell,
member of the Committee
Against Mandatory Funding
said, "The biggest issue is man-
datory funding to us. It took
a long time to get the change
(to voluntary funding). Now
they're trying to get the same
kind of student government they
had before."
"Our aim is to return MSA
to a government students will
be glad to support voluntarily,"
said David Witte of the Volun-
tary Funding Party. "We wish
to encourage more responsible
spending of funds students have
given MSA."
Students for Reform were un-
available for comment.
Although it has no connection
to the party of the SGC era,
Irving Freeman and Bob Mat-
thews, both who have sought
MSA 'seats in the past, have
revived the famed Bullshit Par-
ty. The Bullshit party was no-
torious in 1972 when party head
David Hornstein led the SGC
within one vote of organizing
a dope cooperative.
\
FREEMAN SAYS the Bullshit
Party is campaigning in favor
of the proposed constitution.
Elections director Myra Wil-
lis "hopes for good, weather"
to get a large turnout for the
election. Willis plans polling
places at various sights around
campus including the Union,
Fishbowl, and Geddes buststop.
Students may also vote at the
larger dormitories during the
evening.

PER DISC

MAHLER: DAS
Janet Baker, Jan
Orchestra/Bern
6500.831

BERNARD HAITINK
BEETHOVEN-
THE 9 SYMPHONIES

year,"

said resident

director! dents to and from school.

The Program in Comparative Literature
announces a lecture
"LITERARY CRITICISM:
THE CHINESE VIEWPOINT"
BY
Professor Yen Yuan-shu
of the National Taiwanese University
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19-4:10 P.M.
EAST CONFERENCE ROOM, RACKHAM

TCHAIKOVSKY: THE NUTCRAC ER,
PP. 71 (COMPLETE)
Boys Choir of St. Bavo Cathedrai; Con-
cergebouw Orchestra/Antal Dorati.
6747.257 (2 record set)

747304
o

BEYOND THE SUN
An Electronic Portrait Of Hoist's
"THE PLANETS"
PATRICK GLEESON
Mars; Venus; Mercury, Jupiter; Saturn,
Neptune; Uranus
SRI 80000
M R 14-80000

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MERCURY GOLDEN IMPORTS ALSO SPECIALLY PRICED
SALE PRICES GOOD THROUGH NOVEMBER 20th

$2.50 Student Tickets
Opera production of
Robert Ward's
} 'fi-I E O
BASED ON
Arthur Miller's play
o Sa rNOV. 18-21-8 P.M.
AT THE
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATER
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE MEN-
DELSSOHN BOX OFFICE
Student I.D. required for Student Ticket Price

Rese a rchers quell
tes me tensions
(Continued from Page 1) matic desensitization to reduce
IN THIS CASE, three elec- anxiety. Based on,.subjects' re-
trodes are attached to the sub- sponses'to-a questionnaire,
ject's forehead and the amount Parker constructed a compos-
of muscle tension is meAsured. ite test anxiety hierarchy, with
A bioamplifier converts the ten- = scenarios ranked from least
sion into a tone, and the sub- anxious to most anxious.
ject hears a tone proportional
to the amount of tension through, THE UBT S are ' c ke +to
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Sunday 12 noon-6 p.m.
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a set of headphones. By relax-
ing and reducing tension, the'
subjectcan be trained to lower
the tone.
Each of the program's 32 par-
ticipants meets with Parkeror,
his colleague Peter Vagg on an
individual basis for a 90-minute
session each week.
During the second half ofj
each session, Parker and Vagg
utilize the technique of syste-
DEC. GRADS
TO ATTEND
COMMENCEMENT YOU 1
MUST ORDER A CAP AND
GOWN BY
NOV. 19, 1976

imagine the specific situations
from the hierarchy while under
relaxation. By having the sub-
ject do this, those situations
gradually become desensitized,
so that they no longer cause
anxiety.
Parker also asks the students
to practice some of the anxiety
reduction techniques at home.
"We have* them practicing
twice. a day . . . just sitting
down ten to 15 minutes and re-
laxing," he said.
Once the skill has been mas-
tered, he noted, students should
be able to apply the relaxa-
tion techniques to other situa-
tions besides test-taking.

for the connoisseur and the collector:
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*EOMTHE THUS FAR, the results of the
U. CELLAR program haxe exceeded Park-
769-7940 er's expectations. He noted that
most of the students are doing'
__________-- - "exceptionally well."
E KBut, he admitted, "We're not
GR E EKS... going to reduce all tension to
nothing at all. What we're go-
Tonight is your night at ing to do is make it manage-
Bimbo's of Ann Arbor. able."
Come drink be e r of Part of the program's suc-
reduced r a t e s, and cess remains to be measured-
fraternize with y o u r changes in the students' grade
friends. point averages. Parker will
Large groups get comnate pre-training and post-
sparersgwhen training grades and note any
special rates h anarent improvement.
they call ahead.
Parker already has a waiting
BIABO'S list with the names of more
than 50 students who are inter-
of ested in obtaining the training.
Because of the enthusiastic re-
Ann Arbor snonse, the program may be
expanded to become a regular
service of the University's
115 E. WASHINGTON Reading and Learning Skills
Center next term.
There IS a, d xf;ference .:<

3

.MCAT -9LSAT -CDAT
. GMAT .CPAT ."VAT "GRE .OCAT . SAT
. NATIONAL MED. & DENT. BOARDS
.ECFMG .FLEX
Flexible Programs and- Hours

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