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September 09, 1976 - Image 66

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-09

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Page Four
Advocates: Making life,
- -r- -

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, September 0), 1076

Thursd~v, SeDtember ~. 1 ~76

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I

easier tor rn
By BARBARA ZAHS
Being a freshperson at a large and often
impersonal university is an arduous burden to
bare. But being a new addition to the cam
pus community as well as a member of a
minority group makes for an even heavier
cross,.
C reated to combat any problems incurred
by minority students are the University's Chi-
cano, Black and Human Sexuality Advocate
ervices The advocates attempt to aid students
with problems which they cannot take to
other University counseling agencies -seeking
to supplement rather than duplicate the serv-
ices of other departments.
"WE TRY TO make things a little easier,"
explained Lino Mendiola, the University's Chi-
cano Advocate, who stresses the importance
of creating an informal atmosphere to set his
student clientel at ease.
The advocates attempt to aid
students with problems which
they cannot take to other Uni-
rersity counseling agencies -
seeking to su pplenment rather
than duplicate the services of
other departments.
'Students are often made to feel uncomfort-
able in formal University settings, he says. "We
try to create a more informal setting here, and
then try to resolve the student's problem."
The Chicano Advocate's Office, which offers
both social and academic counseling, deals
largely with discrimination claims by Chicano
students. The office has been instrumental in
helping students battle unfair treatment in and
out of the classroom.
MENDIOLA ADDS that because minority
students often perform poorly during their first
semester here, the office counsels many stu-
dents on the problems they incur adjusting to
university academic life.
"The University, we feel, does not provide
enough counseling and tutoring in academic
areas," Mendiola maintains.
In addition to handling individual students'
problems, the Chicano, as well as the Black Ad-
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inorities
vocates, also assist student organizations with
the limited amount of money available to them3
for such aid.
"WE HELP STUDENTS get their organiza-
tions together. There is comfort in numbers,"
says Mendiola,
He warns minority students, however, againstI
isolating themselves by only associating with{
members of their own group. It's avoiding re->
ality, maintains Mendiola.
Richard Garland, the University's Black Ad-
vocate, emphasized the need for "survival in-
formation and training" to help black students
make it through the University. Part of the key
to survival, lie suggests, is knowing what re-
sources are at the disposal of the black stu-
dents, and knowing how to use these wisely.
"STUDENTS NEED to know what services
are available, how these services can serve
them, and whether these services are really
serving them. If they aren't, then the student-
should ask 'why not?'," he said.
In addition to the Black and Chicano advo.
cates, the University also has two Human Sex-
uality Advocates to help individual students as x
well as groups deal with sexual problems, in
cluding homosexualty and bisexuality.
Although the advocates try to make students
more comfortable with their sexual orientation,
they never tell the students what to do, said R.N. Marguerite Roos,
Jim Toy, one of the Human Sexuality advo- next ailing client.
cates.
"WE HAVE THE STUDENTS define what
their concerns are," Toy said. "A lot of times
we are able to deal with the problem, but if we
can't, then we act as a referral agency." T w o a s
Services offered by the Human Sexuality
Advocates' Office include dorm rap sessions ,By PHILLIPI
panel discussions, peer consultation, and a Gay During your stay at t
Hotline' inevitably be afflicted1
Toy emphasized that all of the problems illness. Whether it is a s
which the Human Sexuality advocates deal with sickness, you will be co
are held in strict confidence. Health Service.
Although the advocates provide important Your first encounter w
and worthwhile services, Mendiola and Gar- red tape will more than1
land said they hoped to create enough aware- so take two aspirin; dr
ness so that students will learn where and how and take a deep breath
to get help for their problems without seeking Health Service.
the aid of the advocates.
Mendiola said he hopes other University de- Even after the reception
partments will eventually be able to handle the your little yellow piece c
problems of minority students so there will be uncovered your records
no need for special minority advocates. will be a form to fill rd
of your visit. And even
only half over.
You will be sent fron
one of the numerous clini
maintains. These includ
dermatology, mental hea
family planning. And ye
UIyou with many differe
control.
YUR DOORSTEP!"The people at the H
*'prefer that you make an
become ill, but they wil
even if you walk in. It
t t

a staff nurse at University Health Service, waits patiently for the
c"irin, Ia Isa fluids

iCounseling away
freshpeople woes
By MICHAEL BLUMFIELD
O.K., so you've taken your first hourly in intro chem id
you think the world's going to end because you botched it up
royally. Your paranoia in increasing rapidly because your prof
is inaccessible, every other freshperson in your dorm is calling
himself or herself "pre-med", and you just know that mommy
and daddy aren't going to talk to you if you don't fulfill their
dreams and become a doctor. Fret not. There are people around
to help.
You might run back to the office that you first carne in
contact with during registration-the academic counselors at 1213
Angell Hall. Friendly Isabelle Reed, the receptionist, helps
smooth a wrinkle or two from your furrowed brow with her sym-
pathetic nodding and warm smile as she finds a counselor to talk
to you, who' can help delay your suicide.
YOU'LL SOON FIND that you're not alone in feeling panicky
about the way the first year is starting. Freshpeople tend to use
the services of the office more than any other group. With over
half of incoming freshpersons expressing interest in pre-med,
the counselors expect to do a lot of counseling related to the
field.
One of the first things you might be told is where you can
find help from someone in the chemistry department. If, after
; you've talked to that person, you still can't get the knack of
it, the academic advisors might help you investigate your study
habits. The fact that so many University students never had to
do any serious studying in high school means that many are not
prepared for it in college, report the counselors.
"Setting up priorities as' far as classes and parties go is an
important consideration," says Terrance Brown, counselor and
residence hall co-ordinator. "The idea we try to emphasize is not
to get behind in your studies because it can be impossible to
catch up."
IF IT TURNS out that you're not cut out for the sciences,
advisors can be useful in helping you explore other fields that
may be more along your line of strength. The requirements for
majors (concentrations) in different disciplines can be spelled
out by counselors as well as the distribution demands of your
school in general.
This latter consideration can be particularly perplexing
these days since there are three different plans from which ISA
students can choose. However, "once they've gotten beyond any
initial confusion, most people find the new requirements pro-
gram very flexible," ,Brown says.
If you've decided to major in liberal arts, despite the folk's
ostracism and potential post-graduate unemployment lines, you
still might need some advice of a more immediate nature, like
what to take next semester. For that, there exists an elaborate
system called "checkpoint" which can give you all the informa-
tion you need for registration, as well as tell you what new
courses might be available. Reading the newsletter is perhaps
the most essential act of your academic planning attempts and
the recorded phone information can keep you up to date on such
things as what classes have been closed.
ONE OFFICE, often neglected by new people, that cft
cast a different light on the academics of the 'U,' Is the Stu-
dent Counseling Office (SCO). The student-run office offers as
its primary service notebooks full of evaluations of courses stu-
dents have taken in the past which are being offered again.
The forms record the subjective reactions of students to the
courses and also include descriptions of course requirements.
Impressions of instructors are available from the forms and the
students who operate the office. The SCO is also useful in hoep
ing students with such tasks as late drops and academic gr ev-
ance filings.
Once you get into a specific program, you'll probably want
to see people in that field for designing, a program of study.
In the meantime, rest assured that there are plenty of people
around who can lend an open ear or some constructive advisd.

BOKOVOY
he big 'U', you will
by some variety of
ore back or sleeping
ompelled to visit the
with the mountains of
likely be traumatic-
ink plenty of fluids,
before entering the
t, so take your place.
ist has asked you for
of plastic and finally
, be patient. There
ut stating the nature
then, the battle is
m the main desk to
cs the Health Service
de general medical,
alth, gynecology, and
es, they will provide
ent means of birth
iealth Service would
n appointment if you
1 find room for you
is advisable to call

ahead because if you don't you will probably
have to wait even longer.
IN ADDITION to being an out-patient
clinic, the Health Service provides .emer-
gency care add maintains a small infirmary
for those too sick to sleep in the dorm.'
It also provides a number of services de-
signed to inform students in various areas
of health care. Among these are problem
pregnancy counseling, contraceptive lectures
and special seminars to help you quit smok-
ing. New forums are always being started
and it would be best to get in touch with the
Health Service to see when they, are being
offered.
Lillian Carter, a Health Service aide, be-
lieves that many students are not aware of
the wide variety of services provided.
"If a student is interested in any aspect
of health care our health educators will try
to answer their questions. In addition, we
have an input department that we urge stu-
dents to use to let us know how they feel we
can improve our service," she says.
Although you may encounter many prob-
lems at the Health Service, rumor has it
that they are trying hard to provide you with
good health care. It's just that, like every-
where else at the 'U', they are short of funds
and overrun with students.

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Regents: Powers or patsies?

(Continued 1rom Paze 61
out prejualce to previous can-
didates."
But, as Alice said in the
midst of Wonderland, things
got "curiouser and curiouser.",
Late last year, as the new
search committee completed
its work, Cobb's name sudden-
ly disappeared from the list of
ten finalists ror the post. On
February 3, the Board was
presented with the final three
candidates: Frye, the adminis-
tration's favorite son; Classi-
cal Studies Department Chair-'
I man John D'Arms, who never
actively sought the job (apply-
ing only at the request of
search committee chairman An-
gus Campbell); and Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania Pro-
fessor Phoebe LeBoy. Incred-
ibly, the Board made no effort
to interview any of them, even
after the Affirmative Action
Committee's recommendation
that they meet with the candi-
dates if at all possible. On
February 12, Frye became the
permanent dean.
. To be sure, Frye sported
impeccable credentials, and the
Board's decision to appoint him.

put the college in capable
hands. The entire affair, how-
ever raises serious questions
about precisely who has final
say in such matters. The cloak
and dagger aura surrounding
this administrative drama is
captured in a priceless quote
from Rhodes, who, in answer-
ing a Daily reporter pressing
him for details regarding
Frye's appointment said, "I
don't want to be secretive about
this, but I won't tell you."
THIS LACK of candor and
reference, to reveal the me-
chanics of Regental decision-
making has had other ramifi
cations. Last fall, at the behest
of Fleming, the Board refused
to create a non-voting student
seat or to even endorse the
principle of full student par-
ticipation at all levels of Uni-
versity decision - making. Both
recommendations were offered
by the Commission to Study
Student Governance (CSSG),
charged by the Regents more
than two years ago with de-
veloping ways of making cam-
pus government more effec-
tive.

- --- _

The Center of Campus Is at State Street & S. University!
Only at THE MICHIGAN UNION
Is the Campus Under One Roof:

The Board politely ducked
the student participation issue
by turning the decision back
into the hands of the individ-
ual schools and colleges. The
B o a r d' s major argu-
ment against a student seat,
if it is indeed any argument
at all, was that it would en-
courage other University - re-
lated constituencies (i.e. facul-
ty, alumni, labor) to seek simi-
lar representation. They termed
CSGG's proposal "inappro-
priate."
REGFNT Thomas Roach (D-
Grosse Pointe) said at the No-
vember meeting that the
Board's refusal to grant stu-
dent representation does not al-
ter the language of the Bylaws,
which emphasizes the import-
ance of student participation in
decisionmaking.
"What we are rejecting,"
Roach tersely concluded, "is
change."
While the Regents are, for
the most part, hard working,
well - meaning people who do
as much homework as they can,
it may be time to ask if month-
ly, two-day junkets to the cam-
pus are sufficiently meeting the
needs of an institution with a
laundry list of pressing prob-
lems. If the answer is no, then
a more rigorous system of A*-
gental oversight is needed -
one that will fully and uncondi-
tionally incorporate students.
TIRED FEET?
TRUCK ON DOWN TO
UNION
STATION
SNACK BAR
in MICHIGAN UNION
NOW SERVING
DAILY HOME-MADE:
S~ttRS dp1ts

UNION GALLERY (Art)
UNIVERSITY CELLAR (Student Book Store)
CAMPUS LEGAL AID BRANCH
CAMPUS VOTER REGISTRATION SITE
COUNSELING SERVICES AND 76-GUIDE
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS OFFICES
STUDENT SERVICES OMBUDSPERSON
MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY (MSA)
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITY CENTER (UAC)
MINORITY ADVOCATES
ETHICS & RELIGION OFFICE
CONCERI TICKET DESK
SOUVENIR CANDY STAND

LOBBY LOUNGE
HOTEL ROOMS FOR CAMPUS VISITORS
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONAL SERVICES
BUS AND AIRPORT LIMO TERMINAL
CAMPUS ACTIVITIES FAIR (September)
PINBALL GAME ROOM
ART WORKSHOP (Collaborative)
PENDLETON ARTS INFORMATION CENTER
INTERNATIONAL CENTER
UNIVERSITY CLUB (Restaurant)
BILLIARDS
BOWLING LANES
MUSIC PRACTICE ROOMS

PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
DISABLED STUDENT SERVICES
RENTAL MAIL BOXES
UNION STATION (Snack Bar)
CHECK CASHING
MEETING & BANQUET FACILITIES
HOUSING MEDIATION SERVICES
OFFICE OF STUDENT PROGRAMS
STUDENT INFORMATION CENTER
BALLROOM
STUDENT INSURANCE OFFICE

POSTERS
POSTERS
POSTERS
POSTERS
POSTERS
(We're more than books.)

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