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November 18, 1976 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, November 18, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage 1 nree

Panel blasts U.S. involvement Gilmore's condition) Terrorists attack ho

tel

in Latin America at Teach-in

improves after OD

(Continued from Page 1)
Discussing. what was termed
"i n d i r e c t economic involve-
ment" by the U.S. in El Salva-
dor, zoology TA Michael Huston
used charts and graphs to il-
lustrate the Central American
country's unequal land distribu-
tion between rich and poor.
The statistics he used were
compiled by a University zoo-.
logy department member, Bill
Durham. Durham conducted re-
search work in land use in El
Salvador during four years as
part of his thesis work.
THE COUNTRY suffers from,
an "apparent Malthusian crisis,"
said Huston-plagued with a
growing population rate, a high
infant mortality toll and less
land devoted to growing grain
for food..
El Salvador utilizes 75 per'
cent of her land surfaces for
agriculture. But, the best land
is reserved for growing export!
crops, like coffee and cotton.
Seventy-one per cent of all El
Salvadorians live on small
farms, growing staple grains on
11 per cent of the land. The
large farms grow the coffee and
cotton, resources not used in
El Salvador, according to Hus-
ton.

"The real problem is inequit- because of United Fruit's con- (Continued from Page 1) tthan Gilmore and was found un-
able distribution of land, not trol of its use," Rice said. sued today said Gilmore was in conscious with his photo pressed
population growth," noted Hus- The company is "diversifying "fair, stable" condition. to her bare breast early Tues-
ton. El Salvador's plight stems and getting into different sec- 'f day, was still unconscious yes-
from "uncontrolled capitalism tors, broadening its base in f all goes well medically terday and in {critical condi-
and reinforced by oppressive Costa Rica," Rice added. He through tonight (Wednesday tion.
military regimes in the coun- summed up the situation in night), physicians feel he can
try," he said. Costa Rica as "Third World be safely transported to the OFFICIALS AT the Utah Val-
labor and resources going to care of the hospital at Utah ley Hospital at Provo, 40 miles
THE U.S. seems indirectly in- U.S. needs." State prison some time tomor- south of here, refused to specu-
volved because El Salvador's A history of U.S. military in- row. late on her chances for surviv-
problems are "fostered and volvement in Nicaragua was de- Gilmore is co iafternong wr.h A hearing of the Utah Par-
goernteb spthat maintains it"fh livered by Mario Badouin, a hospital staff, eating meals on dons Board, which was due to
government H,' former student i the zoology his own and has generally re- decide if Gilmore, 35, would be
concluded Huston. department. covered from the effects of the executed or his sentence com-
The second speaker, Bob Rice, drug overdorse," the bulletin muted was ut off yesterday
a zoology student, discussed BADOUIN ALSO related some d.
United Fruit's control of the of the repressive tactics of the I ecau see ofh on decemb .
banana industry in Costa Rica. Nicaraguan National Guard. The GILMORE, SENTENCED to; Priso officials aiD tey
United Fruit is a subsidiary of National Guard is the "main in- death for the July killing of a Prison officials said they
the U.S. based corporation, strunrent that keeps the Somoza motel clerk and pressing to be were investigating the possi-
United Brands. family (referring to Nicaragua's executed by firing 'squad as bility that Gilmore and Bar-
Calling it analogous to the crrent president, Aastasio So- soon as possible, painted a vi- rett concluded their death pact
situation of U.S. coal miners, mnoza) in power." According to. sion of naradise in letters from and she smuggled him the drugs
Rice told of how United Fruit's Badonin, the Somoza family prison to Barrett in which he: at a meeting in his death row
employes live in company- owns ten per cent of Nicaragua's said that they would run cell on Monday..After the visit
owned houses and buy food at gross national product. through fields together in a the woman told reporters out-
company-owned stores. He de- "Nicaragua's history was shap-| beautiful afterlife expressing side she and Gilmore were en-
scribed the lives of Costa Rican, ed by the U.S. conflict for means their love. gaged
fruit workers as "controlled, or of transportation to the West 1 But he awoke yesterday with
guided, at any rate by the I{Coast" said Badouin.a sn i, .;..
sad adu an J 5ox .I kiai hl 11fIA'

(Continued from Page 1)
tack, the four terrorists entered
the hotel, directly across the:
street from the U.S. embassy,
at about 9:50 a.m. and a sus-
picious security guard asked
them for their identity cards.
They then drew Kalachnikov
submachine guns from suitcasesI
they were carrying and began
spraying bullets around the bu-
sy hotel lobby.
GUESTS SCREAMED with
fright. Some threw themselves
on the floor. Others smashedt
windows with chairs and leaped
into a garden one floor below.
One of the terrorists asked a
guest to telephone the Jordan-
ian government, but before hel
could- get through scores of Jor-
danian army commandos had
surrounded the hotel.
The commandos used bull-
horns to demand that the guer-
rillas surrender. The Palestin-
ians began firing instead.
WITHIN MINUTES, four ar-
my helicopters dropped com-+
mandos on the roof of the sev-
en-story building. One gunman+

rished to the roof and opened
fire, killing a Jordanian officer.
The Palestinian was shot dead.
Commandos on the ground;
rushed the lobby and-pushed up:
to the second and third floors.;
The guerrillas retreated to the:
fourth floor, reportedly with
some hostages.
THE HOTEL'S 250 rooms were:
full of foreign businessmen and
tourists, but most managed to
flee to safety. Many locked
themselves in their rooms.
Explosions were heard from
the hotel and smoke clouds bil-
lowed up as the battle raged.
Some time during that period,
the Palestinians attempted to
have a note delivered to the
army officer in command of
the siege by a hotel guest, the
spokesperson said. The note at-
tacked the "Riyadh and Cairo
decisions" of Arab heads of
state which legitimized Syrian
intervention in Lebanon.
The spokesperson said the au-
thorities refused to communi-
cate with the attackers.

gunmen, the spokespersonasaid.
"The king ordered that the
operation be conducted with the
minimum possible of losses in
lives, especially among the ho-
tel guests," the spokesperson
said.
Just before 2 p.m. yesterday,
the troops inside stormed up
from below while other sold-
iers landed on the roof of the
seven-floor hotel by helicopter.
There was only a brief battle
before the gunmen were crush-
ed.
Join The Daily
LADIES' or CHILDREN'S
HAI RCUTTING
A SPECIALTY.
DASCOLA
STYLISTS
ARBORLAND-971-9975
MAPLE VILLAGE-761}-2733
E. LIBRTY-668,9329I
E. UNIVERSITY-662-0354
SHOWTIMES

I

King Hussein personally or-
dered the final attack on the

, Ubl U ".Y 1U. , - 1A/ - 1 , T t, U~I l.
company." U.S. militarv intervention be-
an in the mid-1800's when the,
COSTA RICAN land suffers California Gold Rush increased
from depleted,soil nutrients and the need for a cheap transporta-
the increased likelihood of ba- tion route to the West Coast,
nana disease becoming rampant Radouin noted.

anoygen masx on ps race .
and two prison guards standing
constant watch over him in a
bare hospital room.
Barrett, a divorcee and moth-y
er of two who took a much
stronger dose of sleeping pills

'U' ranks with most expensive

(ContAnued from Page 1)
WHEN A UNIVERSITY such
as,Michigan has reason to es-
calate student charges, other
large institutions throughout
the country are usually not far
behind, Phillips says.
The NAStOLGC report readily'
documents the observation that
the University 'was not alone
in raising its fees in 1976.
Of 135 state and land-grant
universities surveyed for the
report, only 15 "held theline"
on undergraduate fees. Sixty-
nine of the universities'- more
than half - were forced to in-
crease tuition, required fees
and room and board All at once.

THE MEMBER schools of
NASULGC, which are tradition-
ally committed to keeping stu-
dent charges as low as possible,
cite inflation as the primary
reason for rate increases, ac-
cording to the report.
Despite the University's rate
hikes during the past year,
Michigan has actually fallen a
few notches in the "top ten"
listings, when compared to a
1975 survey.
When tuition and required stu-
dent fees are considered alone,
the University has dropped
from seventh most expensive
school in 1975 to the eighth,

as far as in-state undergradu- I
ates are concerned.
IN A 1973 SURVEY, the Uni-l
versity ranked as the most ex-1
pensive school in terms of out-
of-state tuition ana fees. Last
year, the University owned the
No. 2 position, and in the 1976
survey it dropped to the No. 3
spot among public institutions.
in the U.S.
The slight, change in position
simply means that some other
schools were increasing fees in
greater proportions than the
University, according to Phil-
lips.
University officials feel no joy'
in seeing Michigan among the
ten most expensive state and
land-grant universities in the!
country.
"I DON'T THINK anyone is

very proud of it," said Dr. Ern-
est Zimmerman of the Office of
Academic Affairs. Zimmerman
helped compile student charges
for the NASULGC survey this
year.
The Association has been com-,
piling student charges at state
and land-grant universities for
eleven years.
"The schools find them very.
valuable in seeing where they
rank in comparison with other
institutions like theirs," Phil-
lips said.!
The annual figures are also'
helpful, she said, in university
budget deliberations.

Guest Artist Srics
* *w *
*
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Nov 232426,27-8pm
* Nov 28- 2&8pm
PowerCenter
I ickets avaialae at PTP icket Office
Mendelssohn Theatre Lobby Mon.-Fri. 10-1 24
For informa C I1 764-0450
-e ea'a-- *2ath a He- s

i

I

I

Fallout from China
bomb may hit U.S.

. Il ..

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN-DEARBORN
PRESENTS
"WHEN YOU COMIN' BACK,
RED RYDER?"
a contemporary American drama
by MARK MEDOFF
NOV. 18, 19, 20 at 8:00
NOV. 21 at 3:00
BRYANT JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
460 N. Vernon, Dearborn
(I bik. north of Cherry Hill Rd., west of Telegraph)
ADMISSION: $2.50 AT THE DOOR

f 7
Ron)a'S of Ann ARBOR
.. . one of the finest facilities
in Ann Arbo-presents THE FINEST
Smorgasb'ord
luncheon,
.. starting November 15
and continuing every Monday through Friday
from 11:30 A.M. to 2:00 P.M.
Roma's will offer a smorgasbord
open to the public that promises
to be the finest ever.
Salad Bar
Soup
Two Main Entrees
Potato
Vegetable
Coffee, Tea, Milk or Pop
$3.50 per person
If private rooms are desired, consult the Manager.
-
vE SE T O A() \-
Rona's of Ann ARBOR
2196 W. Stadium Blvd.
at Liberty

I

7:00 and 9:05 P.M.

I

1 1

i

WASHINGTON (P)-Chinas set
off the largest nuclear explo-
sion in its history yesterday,
prompting U. S. officials to im-
mediately activate a nation-
wide network of stations to
! monitor radioactive fallout
from the blast.
The explosion occurred at 1
a.m. EST yesterday at the Lop
Nor nuclear test site in western
China, said a spokesman for the
Energy Research and Develop-
ment Administration (ERDA).
THE CHINESE test was an
above-ground, blast, a type
which produces the familiar'
mushroom cloud and sends ra-
dioactive particles into the at-
mosphere where winds propel
them ar.ound the world.
A Chinese nuclear explosion
in September resulted in a
sprinkling of low - level radia-
tion in the United States. The
greatest fallout in the U. S.
was in the East where signifi-
cant traces of radiation turned
up in cows' milk, particularly
in Pennsylvania. But the ra-
dioactivity never reached levels
considered hazardous to hu-
mans, officials said.
The Environmental Protec-
tion Agency (EPA) activated
its network of monitoring sta-
tions after the blast was detect-
ed by ERDA's sensitive measur-
ing devices. It has 61 measur-
ing stations, which are in every
state except West Virginia and
New Hampshire.
OFFICIALS SAIDthe;
aniount of radioactive fallout
expected to occur may not be
greater than in September be-
cause the amount of fallout de-
pends partly on weather condi-
tions at the time the nuclear
cloud passes' over the United
States.
ERDA said the latest explo-
sion had a force of 4 mega-
tons, or 4 million tons of TNT,
and was the fourth Chinese nu-
clear blast reported this year.
EPA said the September blast
measursed 200 kilotons or 20
times smaller than yesterday's
explosion.
In a broadcast monitored in -
Tokyo, Hsinhua, the official
Chinese news agency, said the
test was a "heavy blow to the,
two superpowers, the Soviet
Union and the United States,
which are-pursuing hegemon-
USHER
POSITIONS

ism (world domination)
tempting to practice
monoply and nuclear
mail."

and at-
nuclear
black-

HSINHUA DID not say the
size of the bomb, nor did 'it
mention whether the test was
carried out in the atmosphere
or on the ground.
The People's Daily, organ of
the Communist party of China,
said in a comnrentary that "the
success of this test, which has
raised the level of China's nu-
clear weapons to a new height,
is a reflection of the important
achievements in China's nu-
clear weapons to a new height,
is n reflection of the important
achievements in China's science
and technology."
As usual after such explo-
sions, Hsinhua said the test
was for defensive purposes only
and repeated that China would
never be the first to use atomic
weapons.
The largest American nuclear
test publicly announced was a
15-megaton explosion, ERDA
said.
The atomic bombs dropped on
Japan during World War II
were rated at 20 kilotons. A
kiloton is equal in explosive
force to 1,000 tons of TNT.

thru
- Cd SSlf(Qd

I

ART I:
"Love Under 16"
AND
"Liquid Lips"
ART II:
"Fireworks Woman"
AND
"Newcomers"
Art Theaters
31 N. WASHINGTON
Ypsilanti 482-3300

DECEMBER
GRADS
COMMENCEMENT WILL BE
HELD ON DEC. 19, 1976.
ALL CAP & GOWN ORDERS MUST BE
PLACED BY NOV. 19. LATE ORDERS AR
SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY & $2 LATE FEE.

I

k

Complete

761-4262
Catering Service Since 1944

_~ + jj

RENTAL HOOD DEPOSIT TOTAL
Bachelor $6.25 - 2.00 $ 8.25
Master $7.00 5.25 2.00 $14.25
Doctor $7.50 5.50 2.00 $15.00
All Orders Must Be Prepaid IN FULL When Placed
Mon.-Thurs. 9-9; Fri. 9-5:30; Sat. 10-5; Sun. 12-5

R.C. PLAYERS present

x V
1
. ,
, ,.
; .
e
Y i
},

Pirandello' s
(IF YOU
THINK SO
Directed by
Jack McLaughlin
NOV. 18, 19, 20
8 P.M.
EAST QUAD
AUDITORIUM
Admission $1.00

I

Lqq

wor

TOMORROW!
CHI' PSI FRATERNITY presents
A SPECIAL MIDNIGHT CONCERT with the
David Bromberg Band

I

An Elephant drinker
always remembers.
Carlsberg Elephant is a unique
continental malt beverage with
a refreshingly different body
and taste.
Perfect companion to Carlsberg's
two great Danish beers.
Carlsberg and
Carlsberg Special
Dark Lager.
IMPORTED

ORSON WELLES' 1941
CITIZEN KANE-
Voted the best film of all time in -many inter-
national polls, this film stands apart from the
Hollywood it was made in. An uncompromised )
and challenging work, it shines with the direct-

I

I

EPRIMEREEM

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