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November 16, 1976 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-11-16

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Tuesday, November 16, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Tuesday, November 16, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Time no damper on
Blue-Buckeye rivalry
By BRIAN MILLER
History, as any devotee oft
that subject can tell you,
tends to repeat itself. If this
is true, the 1976 Michigan
football team should hope to
duplicate the events of the
1964 season. y
To date, the similarities
between the two seasons area
remarkable.

WON'T COMMIT HIMSELF:
Big game doesn 't

faze

w

By United Piess 'nternational
COLUMBUS, Ohio - A re-
laxed Ohio State Coach Woody;
Hayes told his weekly news
luncheon yesterday, that he
preferred to "wait until Satur-
day" to talk about the Buck-,
eyes' Big Ten showdown with
Michigan.
"After that game Saturday at
Minnesota, there's not much
to say," Hayes began, "and the
"I don't look at it like we're
jinxed or anything like that,"
said Bo iesterday. For further
details of the Michigan men-
for's weekly luncheon see Rich
Lerner's column on page 8.
game coming up (Michigan),
we never have anything to re-:
ort until after it is over.
We'll wait until Saturday to
talk about that." '
OHIO STATE Sports Informa-
tion Director Mary Homan an-
nounced that, as usual, Buck-
eye practices would be closed

but Hayes would meet the press significant effect on the Buck-
each night after practice. eye running game, especially
Hayes even tried to discour- in short yardage situations.
age attendance at those meet- Hayes expressed concern
ings by saying, "I don't think about his kicking game, which
they will be very newsworthy. he said was not up to Buckeye
If we have an injury, we're not standards of the past few
going to announce it and we years.
won't be changing our usual "It's not as good as it has
practice program any." been," said Tieves. "We've got
Hayes was pleased with the to work or' week and also
physical shape of the Buckeyes
following Saturday's 9-3 victory
over Minnesota. Q
"OUR FOOTBALL team. is 1' 20
about as good as it can be
healthwise," said Hayes. "We IlUnited Press International
have one or two players who 1. Pittsburgh (22) 10-0 339
might miss practice today, but 2. UCLA (15) 9-0-1 380
that's the extent of it." 3. USC (1) 8-1 303
Haves said there was a
possibility tight end Jimmy . MIChIGAN (3) 9-2 268
Moore, who has been out with 5. Texas Tech 8-0 235
a knee injury since the third 6. Georgia 9-1 200
game of the year, might be 7. Maryland (1) 10-0 136
ready for some action. 8.,Ohio State 8-1-1 149
"There is an outside chance," 9Ohoat--11
said Hayes. "We're hoping we 9. Oklahoma 7-2-1 41
can get him ready for some 10. Iowa State 8-2 ?3
li'm'itd duty." 11. Nebraska 7-2-1 25
THE PRESENCE of the 6-5, 12. Texas A & M 7-2 24
260-pound Moore could have a 13. Houston 6-2 23

watch that we don't tire Tom
Skl idany's leg."
S.L \DANY, who led the na-
tion in punting the past two
years, is also doing all the
nirements this season. His
nunting average is down some
six vards per kick.
Hayes was asked how he felt
aho,t the upcoming game.
"You smcan you want my gut.

oody
feeling," Hayes replied .with a
wry grin.
"Is it fun for you?" the ques-
tiozier asked.
"There's a difference be-
tween work and fun," answered
Haves. "The fun is in the
wiming." If you go out there
with a smile on your face,
Youll lose. , ,Fun is in the
achievement."I

PRO STANDINGS

IN BOTH years, the Wol-
verines were ranked high
nationally and owned the
best ground game in the
country. Both teams werex
undefeated going into the
Purdue game and both teams
were dealt upset defeats by
the Boilermakers.
As a result, both teams
needed a win against the b .
league - leading Buckeyes in HALFBAC
Columbus in order to secure heroes fron
a Rose Bowl berth. through the
The end of the 1976. story Although th
has yet to take place, but defeat Ohio;
this year's team should hope in the Rose
for as happy an ending as
the 1964 story.
THE MICHIGAN-OHIO STATE game of
1964 was, as expected, a titanic defensive
struggle. Ohio State accumulated 180 total
yards while Michigan could only muster a
total of 120.
Nevertheless, Michigan played superbly
on defense and turned Buckeye mistakes into
points.
A Buckeye mistake, in fact, led to the
game's only touchdown.
As the first half drew to a close, Ohio half-
back Bo Rein went back to receive a punt.
Michigan's punter Stan Kemp, knocked the
ball 50 yards, Rein fumbled, and the Wol-
verines' John Henderson recovered on the
Ohio State 20 yard line.
MICHIGAN QUARTERBACK Bob Timber-
lake then, ran for three yards. On the next
play, he passed to halfback Jim Detwiler for
the score.
Timberlake closed out the scoring with a
field goal at the start of the final quarter.
Michigan coach Bump Elliot said that this
was Michigan's "best defensive game all
year," and Timberlake agreed that the de-
fense had indeed won the game.
"The offense, they get you the points," 11e
said recently, "but to shut out Ohio State
Columbus isnot an easy thing to do. That
was great."
TIMBERLAKE REFLECTED further
about the game.
"I was angry (after the loss to Purdue)
because I thought we played well. I was
diqappointed because it spoiled a perfect
season, but that loss took the pressure off
us.'

lPetro
lIndia
Chica
Mtilwa
portly
Seat 1
Los,
Golde
l'hoer

NBA
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division,
W L Pet.
4er 9 1 .900
ait 8 6 .571
sas City 6 7 .462
ana 4 9 .308
ago 2 8 .200
aukee 3 11 .214
I>acific Division
land 7 3 .700
fle 7 6 .538

Angeles
Ien State
nix

NHL
WALES CONFERENCE
Norris Division
W L

i
4
2

7
6
6

.417
.400
.250

(dl
3
4!/
7
8
3
3
4
1
1
3

Adams Division

Bqson
Buffalo
Toronto
Cleveland

13 3
9 5
6 7
6 7

4
2
4

_K JIM DETWILER, one of Michigan's many
n the 1964 victory over Ohio State, breaks
Air Force. line in a game earlier that year.
e Wolverines lost to Purdue, they went on to
State in the decisive game, and secure a berth
Bowl.
He noted that if it weren't for the loss,
"we might not have won the rest of our
games."
Timberlake, now in the clergy, went on to
say that he prepared for the Ohio State game
the only way he knew how, by practicing as
hard as he could.
DETWILER, A DENTIST in Perrysburg,
Ohio, also reminisced about that season.
"I was directly responsible for the Purdue
loss," he explained. "I fumbled in the end
zone. I felt like Jim Smith must have felt
when he dropped that pass."
Like Timberlake, Detwiler was not fazed
about playing the Buckeyes at Ohio Stadium.
"The whole starting backfield was from
and we had more players from Ohio
I from any other state. We were looking
fo, ward to that game."
AS IT TURNED OUT, after Michigan's vic-
tory against Ohio State, the Wolverines went
on to a 34-7 Rose Bowl victory over Oregon
State.
While both men agreed that this year's
Michigan team is very good, only Detwiler
would predict a winner.
"I think Michigan will win," he said.
"They have the all-around better team.
They'll be ready too."
When asked to make a prediction about
the outcome of this year's game, Timber-
lake inst laughed.
"The only prediction I'll make," he joked,
"is that I'll have a headache after the
game."

Montreal
Los Angeles
Pittsburgh
Washington
Detroit

13 3
8 6
6 7
5 10
4 9

I

T Pts
3 29
6 22
5 17
2 12
3 11

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Divisioi4

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE
Patrick Division

Spikers end season
with best win mark

11. Notre Dame 7-2-0
15. Tulsa 7-2
16. Colorado 7-3
17. Oklahoma State 6-3
18. Rutgers 10-0
19. Brigham Young 8-2
' 19. (tie) Wyoming 8-2

1?
7
5
4
4.

Philadelphia 7 4
Buffalo 7 4
Boston 6 5
N. V. Knicks 7 6
N. 'Y. Nets 5 8
Central Division
Cleveland 11 2
New Orleans 7 5
Houston 6 5
San Antonio 6 6
Atlanta 5 7
Washington 5 7

.636
.636
.545
.538
.385
.846
.583
.515
.500
.417
.417

3' I
4
4% ,
05 .
4'%

N. Y. Islanders 12
Philadelphia 8
Atlanta 7
N. Y. Rangers 6
Smythe Division
Chicago 9
St. Louis 9
Vancouver 5
Minnesota 5
Colorado 4

2
7
7
10
8
8
13
11
12

3
3
5
2
2
0
1
2
2

27
20
16
16
27
19
19
14
20
18
11
12
10

By BRIAN MARTIN

Vong stressed continually

s-

In last weekend's state tour- throughout the season tat ne
nament, the Michigan women's had no junior or senior play-
volleyball team had its season ers, and the first line consist-
come to an end, when Michigan ed of freshmen and sophomores.
knocked them out of competition "What differentiates us from
in the second round of play. MSU is that girls go to MSU
In a tournament more comn- to play volleyball and they
plicated than CRISP 'registra- come here to go to school
tion, the spikers advanced to first," Vong explained.
Saturday's action by defeating The spikers traveled to many
Western Michigan, 8-15, 15-2, meets with only the starting
and 15-9. seven line-up. Both injuries and
MSU played Western prior to studies hampered the team all
facing the Wolverines and per- year.
formed shakily, but rebounded "One girl came up to me the
against Michigan, 5-15 and 4-15. day before the state tourna-
"Actually, we played MSU ment and asked if she could
even games," Coach Sandy stay home and study for an
Vong said. "But the girls exam," Vong said.
couldn't come through under Even though the season is
pressure. We made very fun- over, the spikers will continue
damental errors. For instance, to "practice on their own" and
we had seven consecutive bad "go to an occatsional tourna-
:serves in the first game." ment" Vong said.
The Wolverines placed fifth met aid
in the state tournament, the The team is very green,
highest finish ever in Michigan's oadtim onconditioning thi
history, and concluded their sea- year. The girls will stay in
son with a 10-6 record, also a shape and we can concentrate
new school mark. on mental conditioning earlier
"At the hv , ng of the year, next year," Vong added.
if you told me that we wvould nx er ogadd
be 10-6,d would gladly have Vong looks ahead to next year
taken it," Vong said. "But when with excitement. The entire
I saw the t-!nt that we had, team will return accompanied
I anticipated a much better fin- by the all-important experience
ish." they gained from this season.

I
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Announcing the 2nd Annual
MICH IGANENSIAN
PHOTO CONTEST
NO THEME!

' _ _-_
; -
iJ
1
1
J

Enter anything and everything. Winners to be published in 1977 MICHIGAN-
ENSIAN YEARBOOK. Grand Prize and 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes for both
B&W and Color categories. No entry fee and no themes! If you like it, we'll
like it!
RULES:
1) 2 categories-B&W and Color (prints or transparencies-8x10 maximum,
don't mount prints)
2) Entry Deadline-Dec. 3rd. Bring or mail entries to 2nd floor business office,
Student Publications Bldg., 420 Maynard. Enclose SASE for return of prints.
3) Winners to be announced Dec. 6.

GRAND PRIZE
$100 gift certificate
FROM
Big George's
Home Appliance Mart

I am submitting ... photographs. CHECK ONE: B&W .. COLOR .. .
NOTE: Identify EVERY print or slide with Name, Address and Telephone No.

I
"

NAME....................................................
A -" r% C("C

m

! 3

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