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November 16, 1976 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-11-16

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EntertainmTHE MICHIGAN DAILY
Arts & netim nt 1 uesday, Novembr1 6, 1 976 Page Five

w
,.

Eagles rock 'em
at Cridler Arena

Haitink conducts superbly

By JIM SHAHIN
WVHAT THE Beach Boys prim-
ed, the Eagles ijiced.
The newer wave of popular
Pacific rock is everything the
earlier generation was, only
more so. More melody, more
vocals. See, the masses never
tire of a good song. While indi-
vidual musicianship makes a
good crust, it's singability that's
the filling.
In that sense, then, the Eagles
threw a lot of pies at the audi-
ence in Crisler Friday night,
and the, crowd ate it up.

if 'minspiring rendition of "Dool-
in-Dalton," they played the title
cut of their new album, "Hetel
California" (to be released just
after Thanksgiving). It was a
mature, textured piece, atten-
tive to development, featuring
a double-lead discourse between
Meisner and Walsh.
After a few more tunes (in-
cluding some trademark Eagles
laments like "Tequila Sunrise,"
"Take it to the Limit," "Des-
parado," and another new one
called "Wasting Time") the
cauldron started to bubble. Joe
Walsh came snealing up with
an intro that squealed into a

DISHING OUT all the expec- 4resounding version of his own
tations, the performance was "Turn to Stone." The audience
a measure of just how well awoke.
they could pull it off . Not dis- A COUPLE MORE Eagles
appointing (except in a few numbers followed - lively, but
spots), not enthralling (except not particularly exciting execu-
in a few others), the show pret- tions of "Already Gone" and
ty much equalled anticipation. "One of These Nights." Then
Which, by the 'way, is a compli- all hell broke loose.
ment of sorts. Joe Walsh exploded the Eagles
Of sorts, because anticipation into the old James Gang tune,
was high. And because there is ,"Funk No. 49." Spontaneous
a calculation at work here. The and biting, Walsh slammed the
Eagles have tirelessly sought guts to the floor. With no stops
a sound that combines AM sub- and acidic guitar work that0
scription with FM acceptance, emphasized the inestimable val-
guitar in harmony with voice,! ne of immediacy to live rock
both in harmony with song with 'n' roll, Walsh pushed the Ea-
no strings attached. The pro- gles past the limit. Past inten-
gressive middle. They have tions. Nihilism, his stick-your-
found it. Now, it's habit. nose-in-it guitar affirmed, is not
Which is why it'l not quite just talk.
good enough just to meet ex- There was no looking back.
pectations. To be a great live "W " s
act ou aveto o mre han Rocky Mountain Way" was
act you have to do more than yet to come. Clapping and
sound every bit as good as your stomping, the audience show-
albums. It begins with tran- ered its approval. Walsh re-
scending the studio and ends sponded with riffs that sounded
somewhere around a feeling of!dangerous, malicious, almost
evocation; an emotional murderous - without any fore-
arousement and involvement thought. His slide playing was
that makes you know that these like whiplash, rip' g the spine
guys just can't be adequatelyp from your back. And the Eagles
captured on wax. The kind of found they weren't over their
feeling you get at a Rolling heads out there past the limit.

By KAREN PAUL whole became a layered ma.-.
SPEAKING with Bernard of energy.
Haitink, conductor of the In the interview, Haitink
London Philharmonic Orches- spoke of his concepts of Mah-
tra, before their concert on Sun- ler's Fifth Symphony (which'
' day night, I got the impression ended this concert). He stress-
of a soft-spoken, sensitive man ed the importance of viewing
with special ideas about music. I the work as a symphony, not
The concert confirmed this im- as a rhapsody, as it is "too of-
pression. ten pulled apart." Haitink re-
A piece like the Malcolm Ar- marked that Mahler's explicit!
nold Philharmonia Concerto is tempo markings must by ad-!
a good opener. It is, as Haitink hered to because, unlike most
described it, "not very deep, great composers, Mahler was
but amrusing, brilliant." The a great conductor too.
first movement is rhythmic and HAITINK'S ideal was evident
brassy, the second contains a throughout the orchestra's per-
sweetly romantic string melody formance of the Mahler sym-
which sometimes approaches phony. In spite of its many con-
impressionism, and the - finale . cn
is a fast, mostly orchestral tutti trasting moods, a continuity
with rips in the horns and waskcreated thrugh thcontr
trumpets and trombone smears. .
Arnold, a former trumpeter and his temposs (though some-
with the orchestra, was com- what slow), dynamics, and
missioned to write the piece phrasing added to the drama'
for this Bicentennial tour of the of Mahler's music.
U.S. Haitink led the orchestra Precision was, at times,
in an exuberant rendition of it. lacking in the brasses, but their
IT W AS evident in their per- _rm ncof Ed arEl ars_
formance of Edward Elgar's Is~m~a~
Introduction and Allegro that
t h e London Philharmonic
strings are the pride of the or-
chestra. Haitink's interpreta-
tion broght out the soothing
ebb and flow of the piece and
the unusually beautiful anti-
phonal effect of Elgar's scor-
ing for solo quartet and orches-
tra of strings. Under Haitink's
direction, the recurring, poig-
nant melody of the string or-
chestra cQuld be anticipated so
greatly that each return seem-
ed a reward.
The development of the di- TU ESD
verse Allegro movement in an
R intricate fugue of almost Bach-,
like character. In this fugue,"
the orchestra was able to ar-WEd
ticulate each part so that the

:lear, bell-like sound and cour-
ageous playing suited the na-
ture of the composer's brilliant
scoring.
Haitink remarked that Mah-
ler's music is popular today be-
cause "he is so very human
. . . he can show his emotions
so that they really come
across,"
THE FIRST part of the sym-
phony is based on a funeral
march. The solo tru npet an-
nounced it somberly and Hait-
ink was able to draw a picture
of tragedy and grief, emphasiz-'
ing the low registers in each
instrument group. Haitink led
the strings into an urgent fren-
zy at the proper moments, and .
subdued them into quiet la-
ment. Then the mood lightened;
but as Haikink remarked, "I'm
distrustful when Mahler is op-
timistic," and the optimism'
quickly changed to urgency.
The third movement was de-'

scribed by Haitink as "exub-
erant . . . a dance of the devil."
The horn obligato part was per-
formed by a young musician
whose tone is bigger than any
I've heard.
The exciting end of the move-
ment became stilled by the im-
mediate calm of the st-ring'
Adagietto. llaitink controll-
I the expressive strings in a
hesitant, then soaring melody.
The fourth movement begins
pastorally with sporadic solos.
This new mood was captured
by the orchestra and inter-
changes between instrument
groups were transacted smooth-
ly.
As Haitink dramatically pick-
ed up the tempo and gradually
crescendoed, tlhe brasses pro-
duced their tightest and most
enormous sound. The symphony
ended with demonic speed and
triumphant brass; a tremen-
dous conclusion to the great
work.

310 MAYNARD
WEEKLY SPECIALS

)AY:

S1/2 price on beer
7 P.M.- 11 P.M.

Daily Photo by SCOTT ECCKER
Joe Walsh

Stones concert, or Bruce Spring- i
steen, Allman Brothers (with Crider wasn't yet ready to
Duane), Cream, or the Grateful leave, and demanded a second
Dead. That feeling is what the encore. So the Eagles returned
Eagles live lacked. and performed Joe Walsh's
Enter - saving grace, Joe "Walk Away" and their own
Walsh. Not a prolific artist or "Tequila Siinrise.

,'
k
k
i

4let 4 4.6e,
THE CRUCIBLE
If you are enthusiastic about
Arthur Miller (as you should
be) and are especially keen
about his play The Crucible -
concerning the Salem witch
trials - then you have an op-
portunity this week to enjoy it
from another angle. The School
of Music is presenting an op-
eratic version of the work, writ-
ten by Robert Ward, this Thurs-
day through Sunday in the Men-
delssohn Theatre. The libretto
is by Bernard Stambler..
LCHIGAN-DEARBORN

p"m sew OUT

FR IDA

IESDAY: 12priceon
,beer & liquor
7 P.M -10 P.M.
kY: 15c Hot Dogs
2-5 P.M.

NEW GIANT 7 FT. T.Y.

even a gifted songwriter, Walsh
is simply a good guitarist 'who
not only makes do with whatt
he's got, but makes up for what i
he doesn't. It was Walsh who
brought out the animal in a l
satisfied; though polite crowd.1
Professional and deviating
slightly from letter-perfect, the
Eagles floated through a pro-
gram of compressed lilts and
dives. (Remember, never over-
do.) Their opening number,
"Take It Easy," seemed to drag
a little, missing the punch it
could 'possess. "Outlaw Man"
was better, showcasing Randy
Meisner on lead, although it was}
ultimately more persuasive'
than convincing. After a full,
I-

These la two songs demon-
strated why the Eagles are so'
big. Even if they don't believe
in their songs, they at least
sound as if they do. It's that
casual way of easing us into
belief that is central to their
success.
THE UNIVERSITY OF M

for viewing your favorite
televised sportingevent$
NO COVER
310 MAYNARD

ciW

PRESENTS
"WHEN YOU COMIN' BACK,
RED RYDER?"
w a contemporary American drama
by MARK MEDOFF
NOV. 18, 19, 20 at 8:00
NOV. 21 at 3:00
BRYANT JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
460 N. Vernon, Dearborn
(1 blk.' north of Cherry Hill Rd., west of Telegraph)
ADMISSION: S2.50 AT THE DOOR

TODAY at
7:00 and 9:05 P.M.

I1

ROn as of ann anso
. . one of the finest facilities
in? Ann Arbor presents THE FINEST
Smorgasbord
luncheon
. ..starting November 15

,-I

a paramounoure
1_Z4in Color

HAPPENINGS
763-1107
ECLIPSE JAZZ
is very proud to present-
tenor saxophonist RAHSAAN ROLAND KIRK and his
ensemble, the Vibration Society, in the Mich. Union
Ballroom Sunday, December 5 at 7:30 and 10:00 p.m.
Details for a free afternoon workshop art being worked
out. Tickets go on sale Thursday, Nov. 18 at the Mich
Union Box Office, Schoolkids Records, and both Discount
Records. All seats ore $4.50.
MAJOR EVENTS OFFICE presents
GO BLUES. An evening with ROOSEVELT SYKES, JIMMY
"Fast Fingers" DAWKINS, and OTIS RUSH. Reserved
seats are available at Mich.. Union, Discount Records in
Ann Arbor, and Where House Records in Ypsilanti.
UAC TRAVEL
UAC XMAS CHARTERS to New York: $90; Newark:
$90; Boston: $100; Philadelphia: $95; Los Angeles:
$225; San Francisco: $225. DEADLINE for sign-ups:
Novemrber 10.E
XMAS SKI TRIP: Banff, Canada: $350, Jan. 1-7.
Deadline for sign-ups: Nov. 19. Office open M-F 10-4.
763-2147.
SOPH SHOW '76
Presents a Musical Comedy, "HOW TO SUCCEED IN
BUSINESS WITHOUT REALLY TRYING" Performances:
Thur., Dec. 9; Fri., Dec. 10; Sat., Dec. 11 in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater. Tickets go on sale, Nov. 15. The
event of the year!
MUSKET
needs Directors, Designers and Staff for its Spring
Musical. Here's your chance to direct or design a major
Power Center oroduction! Apply at UAC,= 2nd floor,
Michigan Union by Wed., November 17.
UAC T-SHIRTS
The ones "Bernie" wears . . . $3.75 at Michigan Union
Box Office.
THE PRINT SHOP-
Lowest Prices on Campus!

i

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\O a bet,
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I E a M.

TODAY at
7:00 and 9:00

and continuing every Monday through Friday
from 11:30 A.M. to 2:O P.-M.
Rorha's will offer a smorgasbord
open to the public that promises
to be the finest ever.
Salad Bar
Soup
Two Main Entrees
Potato
Vegetable
Coffee, Tea, Milk or Pop
$3.50 per person
If private rooms are desired, consult the Manager.

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SHOWTIMES
7:00 and 9:00 P.M.

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