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November 03, 1976 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-11-03

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, November 3, 1976

I'oge Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, November 3, 1976

M IOWm~any peo Ic
do YW kQoW
have been cured
Of cancer?
Flip Wilson
National Crusade Chairman

USHERS
NEEDED for Young Vic
performance of
"Oedipus"
and
"Taming of the shrew"
NOV. 5, 6, and 7
Sign up in PTP Office
Michigan League

PADRE LEFTY WINS CY YOUNG:

Randy

Jones

best

in

NL.

There are 25
reasons why
you like us
PINBALL and
BOWLING
at the
UNIONI
CENTER FOR JAP

By The Associated Press en fist - place votes. Mets team- Fortunately for Jones, that F .....:.:..:: .:..:
NEW YORK - Randy Jones, mate Joni Matlack and Don Sut- didn't prove necessary. "I was
the little left - hander who won ton of the Los Angeles Dodgers scared, but the operation went
22 games for the San Diego received one first-place vote great. It took a hour and a
Padres last season, was named apiece. half and it went great. The doc-
winner of the National League's Jones, a 5-foot-11, 180-pounder tor said the arm is in great
Cy Young Award yesterday by currently recovering from off- shape for the amount of use
the Baseball Writers Association season arm surgery, which it's had."
of America. threatens his career, also re- Jones, in 40 games, struck out
Jones2 who narrowly lost last ceived -six second-place votes just 93 hitters but walked only
year's award - emblematic of and three third-place votes in 50 and compiled the league's
pitching supremacy - to Tom the election. sixth - best earned run aver- "It was a feeling of
Seaver of the New York Mets, He was the only one mention- age: 2.74.
drew 15 of the 24 first-place ed on each ballot, collecting 96 great elation when
votes in balloting by a com- points. Koosman, a left-hander, "IT WAS A feeling of great gltin0'e
mittee composed of two base- I had 69 2points with Sutton third elation when I found out, he
ball writers from each of the 12 at 251/. said. Ifoundksut
National League cities. Just 3 weeks ago, Jones
LEFT - HANDER Steve Carl- underwent the surgery which -Randy Jones
THAT EASILY outdistanced ton of the NL East chamnion reportedly will prevent him
runner-up Jerry Koosman of the Philadelphia Phillies received throwing the slider -one of his
New York Mets, who drew sev- 11 points; Rawly Eastwick, re- most efctive pites.
liever for the World Champion On October 24, his wife pre-
Cincinnati Reds got six points; sented him with Jami Jones,
PANESE STUDIES southpaw Matlack got five, J.R. their second daughter.
Richard of the Houston Astros
prset hadAtwo points and ,,averOgo

NI

Almost everybody knows someone
who has died of cancer. But the fact is
about two million living Americans
have been cured. Not only cured but
leading active, normal lives. Another
fact is millions more could be.
By getting to the doctor in time.
By availing themselves of the most
effective methodsof treatment today.
By advances made through cancer
research. Research which is made pos-
sible with the help of the American
Cancer Society.
However, there's much more to be
done. To help save more people, the
American Cancer Society needs more
money. So, please, give. We want to
wipe out cancer in your lifetime.
American Cancer Society
SSPACE CoTRsUfEO BY THE PUBUSHiEft;0S A PUBLC S VCE

rsshad two points and Seaver got
PROFESSOR JOHN NATHAN one point.
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Jones sprinted to 16 triumphs
and his film documentary in his first 19 decisions but fell
sharnlv after the All-Star break
FULL MOON LUNCH I to finish at 22-14. Koosman
Images of contemporary Japanese family life charged at the end to boost his
record to 21-10, his first 20-vic-
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4-8 P.M. tory season. Sitton also finish-
ROOM 200 LANE HALL ed with 21 triumphs in his first
20-victory season.
OEJones'rfaltering second - half
nerformance had beePn cRd

AND TUESDAY c a m e t[e
phone call which brought to
fruition a childhood dream.
"Talk about setting your goals
high," he said. "When a pitcher
starts out his pro career and
aims for the Cy Young, that's
high. And that's what I did in
1973.
"The impact hasn't hit yet. I
felt I had a better - than - av-
erage chance after coming close
last year. I really wasn't that

Randy Jones
ti : mmanEM.snnmamn

disappointed at losing to Seav-
er. It was an honor to come
that close. But who's to say
you'll come that close again?"
Especially when arm surgery
threatens your career.
"Y tU APPRECIATE it
a little more after an experi- I

ence like that," Jones said.
"The scar tissue is healed and
I have complete extension of
my arm.
"I'll carry that scar for the
rest of my life, but that doesn't
bother me. It could have been
a lot worse."r

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3
Dr. Hva Lazarus-Yafeh
Assoc. Prof. of Islamic Civilization
Hebrew University
"SOME CONTEMPORARY 'FATWAS'
ILLUSTRATING RELIGIOUS
PROBLEMS OF ISLAM IN
MODERN TIMES"

by trouble with a nerve in the
biceps tendon of his left arm.

'f

4:00 P.M.

ROOM 200 LANE HALL

"I COULDN'T MAKE
a muscle," Jones recalled Tues
day, reflecting on his 6-1l finish.
!"The doctor said the nerve
had been fatigued to the pointr
that it wasn't working. Every-
thing I had worked for for the
last two years could have gone
up in smoke.
"Ithought my career was
over."
When the season ended, "I
went into the hospital and real-
ly got frightened when they
shaved both my arms." y
THERE WAS A possibility
that tendons from his right
arm would have to be trans-
planted to his left - a proce-!
drire similar to the one surviv-
ed by the Dodgers' Tommy
John.

1!

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5
Dr. Nikita Elisseeff
Directeur de l'Institut d'Archeologie
et d'Histoire, France
"WHAT DID THE CRUSADERS
SEE IN SYRIA?"

Lytle, Anderson, Wood among
conference' s football leaders

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO - Michigan's top-E
ranked Wolverines dominate
Big Ten team statistics, but in
the very important department
of total defense, Ohio State is
the leader.
Ohio State has allowed an av-
erage of 263.4 yards a game in
five conference games while
Michigan has allowed an av-
erage of 274.4 yards with Iowa
third at 278.4 yards.
Michigan leads in rushing
with an average of 382.8 yards
a game and in total offense
with 472.6 yards. The Wolve-

Sports,
NIGHT EDITORS:
KATHY HENNEGHAN
rines also lead in scoring
with an average of 40 points

Daily Classifieds
Get Rfl

4:00 P.M.

MLB-LECTURE ROOM 1

a game.
Michigan
the leader
average of
Wisconsin
yards.

State is far away!
in passing with qy
212.8 yards a game.
is second at 172.2

r_

LECTURES SPONSORED BY THE CENTER FOR
NEAR EASTERN & NORTH AFRICAN STUDIES

FRI.-SAT.
PHIL RECORDS'
ROSALIE
SOR RELS

$2.50 4
S

Michigan leads in rushing de-
fense allowing but 118.8 yards a
game and in scoring defense
having yielded but 44 points in
five games.
Northwestern is first in pass-
ing defense having allowed but
64.2 yards a game with Iowa
The Top 20
By The Associated Press

second at 86.8 yards a game.
Rob Lytle of Michigan is
the individual rushing leader,
averaging 146.4 yards a game.
Jeff Logan of Ohio State is
second atb109.0 yards a game
followed by Scott Dierking of
Purdue with 103.0 and Mike
Harkrader of Indiana at 100.2.
Mike Carroll of Wisconsin
leads in passing and total of-
fense with Ed SmithF of Michi-
gan State second in both de-
partMents. Carroll is averaging
186.4 yards in total offense to
Smith's 161.5.
David Charles of Wisconsin
is the Passing leader with 22 re-
centions for 259 yards. Kirk
Gibson of Michigan Flite is
second with 18 for 314 yard.
Pete Johnson of Ohio State
is the scoring leader with 60
noints and Rob Wood of
Mirhi-n- jer#l in kick< scor-
ing with 36 noints on 27 con-
versio- and three field gnrls.
Tom Skladany of Ohio State
if second with 34 noints.
Todd Sheets of Neftheastern
leads in kickoff returns with a
31.0 nverage and Trq Matthews
of Wif'consin lends in nunt re-
turns with a 10.5 average.
John Anderson of Michigan is
the nttira leader with a 40.0
-ra'rp follwed byD n Matter
-f Tnw at 96. Pn Beerv of
T"'- 4' "P vl s in interreptions
wit' for.
BILLB~fOARD1

"Rosalie Sorrels has about as many
friends, lovers, cults and devotees as a
singer and a woman can have without
being down-right famous . . joyous,
sad, hard-nosed, tender . . . her songs
are sung in a voice that has been
lived in, a cutting voice that caresses
a song with familiarity but not neces-
sarily gentleness."-Rolling Stone

SUN.-Adelphi Records
Paul Geremia
Paul Geremia is best known for
his excellent renditions of coun-
try blues . . . he is an expert on
the guitar and the best "on the
rack" harp player in the coun-
try. He is also a fine singer-
songwriter whose material has
been heavily influenced by the
flavor of traditional country
blues.

1. MICHIGAN (57)
2. Pittsburgh (5)
3. UCLA
4. Southern California
5. Texas Tech
tie DAILY LIBELS
6. Maryland
7. Georgia
8. Ohio State
9. Nebraska
10. Florida
11. Notre Dame l
12. Arkansas
13. Oklahoma State
14. Colorado
15. Alabama
16. Missouri
17. Oklahoma
18. 'Texas A&M
19. Houston
20. Texas

8-0-0
8-0-0
7-0-1
6-1-0
6-0-0
8-0-0
8-0-0
7-1-0
6-1-1
6-1-1
6-1-0
6-1-0
5-1-0
5-2-0
6-2.0
6-2-0
5-3-0
5-2-1
6-2-0
5-2-0
3-2-1

1,228
1,076
976
758
703
703
547
497
451
342
290
267
80

1421 Hill

8:30

761-1451

pp00 0 IIp M
OP C %00
O055F Old
P/7- ersdner C

,
}' ,2
a '
_J r

146 The Dekers Club is sponsor-
83 ing the first of its "Blue Line
31 ,
26 Luncheons" on Friday, No-
19 vember 5, at noon at the Crys-
is tal Holse Motel, Washtenaw at
Hron Parkway.
Special guests include Dan
Farrell, Michigan h o c k e y
coach and Herb Brooks, Min-
nesota's head.coach.
A public buffet is available
to all attendees, but lunch and
activities will take place in a
private dining area.
The Dekers Club will be
snonsoring these luncheons on
the _ Friday of each home
series' throughout the season.
The public is invited and no
reservations are.necessary.
Women's Intercollegiate bas-
'ketball tryouts will be held
during the week of November
1. Practice will be held from
6-8 p.m. Monday thru Friday
at Crisler Arena. For further
information contact Coach
Carmel Borders or Women's
Athletic Director Ginny Hunt
through the athletic depart-
ment.
Men's junior varsity basket-
ball tryouts will be held oMn-
day, November 8 at Crisler
Arena starting at 5:30. Try-
outs are open to all. Please
bring your own equipment.
For further information, con-
tact coach Dan Fife through
the Athletic Department.

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