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November 02, 1976 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-11-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
A rts & Entertainm ent Tuesday, November 2, 1976 Page Five

II IIMI 'pl F

C

Bream excels with lute and guitar

By JIM STIMSON Maestro. The first tune, a Fan-
tasia, was particularly piquant
1ULIAN BREAM is above all and lyrical. The five dances by;
else a virtuoso. Neither com- English composer John Dowland
position nor teaching seem to (1563-1626) that followed reflect-

interest him in the least. ed the pomp
Moreover, Bream is a virtuo- royal courts
so on two instruments, the gui- French piecet
tar and the lute, and ranks with which opened
!the world's finest on both in- was equally
struments, warmed upt
Bream displayed both talents the music to

and grace of the
of Europe. A.
by Adrian le Roy,
the performance,.
delightful and
the audience for
come.

i

cester (from King Lear), Romeo hope to perform it. Said Bream the trip to Ann Arbor five times
and Juliet, Ariel, Ophelia, Aud- of the final section, "Oberon," since 1963. He is one of the
rey and Touchstone of As You which wanders into silence, "I handful of guitarists who repre-
Like It, and Oberon from A wanted it to drift away into sent the resurgence of the clas-
Midsummer Night's Dream. i air." sical guitar in recent years.
The music that followed was Besides the audience's skepti- Before the emergence of An-
such a departure from the rest cal reception of the work, there dres Segovia and, later, John
of the program that most mem- was a problem of acoustics for Williams and Bream, there was
bers of the audience were left those in the rear. It is surpris- .
agape. Bream described the op- ing that this huge auditorium virtually no one to carry on the
ening as "bitter," and the rest was chosen for solo guitar, rath- tradition of the great ron antic
of the work retained the same er than the more intimate sur- era of guitarists such as Sor,

I

to a full house at Hill Auditori- After an intermission, Bream i wintry vein. The chords were roundings of Rackham Auditori-
um last Sunday afternoon. The made a welcome charge in the I harsh, dissonant and choppy, um.
first part of the performance guitar program with the addi- where in the other pieces they But Bream surmounted the
was devoted to the lute, an in- tion of The Prelude from J. S. had been smooth and graceful. difficulty with determined pro-
strument common to the Ren- Bach's 1st Cello Suite. He also Bream feels Winter Musick jection, and concluded the pro-
aissance and Baroque eras. The played the Prelude-from the 4th is "one of the most developed gram with La Catedral, by the
second half was all guitar work. Cello Suite, bringing off both pieces ever written for con- Brazilian writer Augustin Bar-1
pieces with a flair befitting these temporary guitar. It employs rios (1885-1944). It is a moody
BEFORE PLAYING, Bream fine examples of the High Ba- harmonics, slapping and knock- piece more in keeping with a
explained the use of the lute roque style. Bream himself, aft- ing the guitar face flamenco classical program.
to his audience. He noted that, er the show, commented that style, and an occasional silence
with its 14 to 20 strings, it is he'd always liked Bach's cello to gain a different effect. THE ENCORE was another
a difficult instrument to tune; suites.;pleasant surprise - the 1st
this contributed to its loss of ON THE WHOLE, Royal Etude in E minor by Hector'
popularity in the 18th and 19th THE NEXT PART of the pro- Winter Musick 1976 came off Villa-Lobos. This brilliant and
centuries. Bream remarked gram proved a surprise to ev- sounding more like a Ralph spirited tune was beautifully
that, in its time, the lute was eryone. It was a contemporary Towner (of Oregon) caprice rendered by Bream in one of
known as "the queen of instru- sonata on Shakespearian char- pthan part of the repertoire the finest interpretations I have'
men. aters, written by German co- a classical guitarist. One thing ever heard, missed notes not-
The lute works Bream chose poser Hans Werner Henze at is certain, though: Only a gui- i withstanding.
,-- th s s ecific r resto nf' .-I--

Daily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
Judy Collins sings as she gazes wistfully at the audience during her concert at Hill
Auditorium last Friday night.

for this performance were all'
from the 16th and 17th cen-
tuy. From the pen of Luis Mi-
lan (1500 - 1561) came five!
sprightly pieces, part of El'

Entitled Royal Winter Musick
1976, it flicked through an ex-
traordinary series of moody tig-
nettes on the characters of Glou-

tarist of Bream's caliber could

Bream, a Londoner, has made

A. LUKEWARM CONCERT:
Judy Collins
By MIKE NORTON voice was husky and tired, her'
TT WAS particularly appropri- phrasing uneven, her pronuncia-a
ate that Judy Collins should tion slurred. They ignored the L
have worn a long dress of im- frequent unnecessary warblesL
perial purple for her concert she threw into her vocals to: V
at Hill Auditorium last Friday make them sound new. Collinsu
night. She reigned over her drew wide applause on every'
enthusiastic Homecoming audi- number, some of which I must
ence like a queen, and could no maintain was undeserved - 1
no wrong in their eyes. ier rendition of "Farewell tos
Which is not at all the same Tarwaithie", though, was an-.,
as saying she did not wrong. other matter altogether. As aq
It has always been Collins' recorded track of whale songs
strategy to plan her concerts flowed into the auditorium, onet
with what she calls "hills and co'Klc) '- , a change come overe
valleys", meaning moments of the pe ' 'rmer; a terrible inno-L
alternating excitement a n d cence filled her eyes - the old
calm. I only wish the valleys look we remember from Judy
had been a little less like Collins. And when she sangv
chasms; those moments of calm the song, she sang it straight.
sometimes became hours of There was no experimentation
boredom. this time, only purity.
THE CONCERT began slow- '.'FAREWELL" blended into
Iy, and continued slowly. Her "The Story of Isaac," and the
rendition of "City of New Or- feeling carried over, as well.
leans" was glib and cheap, the Here was a case of superior
high notes at its end sharp material working its spell on
enough to cause ear damage. a berformer, and Collins did it
But the audience ate it up. proud.
They ignored the fact that her Unfortunately, the character
EISENSTEIN'S 1925
The Russian master of montage depicts the
great Russian Block Sea mutiny of 1905. The
"Odessa steps" sequence exemplifies Eisen-
stein's dazzling editing, In 1958, international
jury voted POTEMKIN the "best film in the
world" by a 100 out of 117 votes.
*CINEMA GUILD IS ACCEPTING MEMBERSHIP
APPLICATIONS. INQUIRE AT THE TICKET DESK *
WED: Bergman's WINTER LIGHTS
GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
CINEY. 7:00 & 9:05 Admission $1.25

I

at

Hill:

No

magic

lf the concert deteriorated once,
again. With the exception of
Leonard Cohen's "Take This
Longing From my Heart,"
there was no exceptional work
until the last fifteen minutes of
Collins' performance.
The backup band was excel-
lent in quality, which may have
served to accentuate the poor'
quality of the vocalist. The two
original instrumental composi-
tions which were featured, how-
ever - a quasi-jazz "Solar
Dance" and a trio of Michel Le-
grand - style piano waltzes -
were undistinguished.
Special Attractions
Performing
Oedipus
"Nobility, Swiftness
and Horror!" !
"EplosilyMoving"
Nov. 5&6 8:30pm
And
Che la g
of the Nmw
"BoisterousIrrevrent,
Knockabout Version"
"Bsty Aoyms,&Fuu/"
Nov. 7 2&8pm
PowerCenter
1 kets avaiable at PTP Ticket Oft ce
Me"e*ssohnTheateLobbyMon-F 1 2-5
For Information Call!764-0450

COLLINS .perked up once most of the preceding selec-
again, close to the end of the tions.
performance, with Jacques Ov er all, though, I cannot ad-
Brel's "Mareike", possibly the mit to satisfaction with Collins'
finest piece of the evening. Tl'e performance. Perhaps s h e
next three compositions ("Bread should take a few days off from
and Roses," "Bird on a Wire", work to lounge about and rest
and "Send in the Clowns") were her voice before coming to Ann
much more acceptable than Arbor again.

!!}

MUSKET
NEEDS.
DIRECTORS
DESIGNERS
STA FF
for it's Spring Musical
Her's your chance to direct or
design a major Power Center
production!
Apply at UAC, 2nd Fl. Michigan
Union by Nov. 17
FOR INFORMATION CALL 763-1107
See CAMELOT!.,
Nov. 4,r5, 637,I1O,'11,I12,13

I
I
(

Guiliani, and Tarrega. Now a
wellspring of young talent has
been fostered, including Chris-
topher Parkening, Angel Rome-
ro, Oscar Ghiglia, and others.
Both Bream's guitar and lute
are handmade; they look as
much like works of art as they
do musical instruments. And Ju-
lian Bream brings out their
beauty as he does the beauty
of the music he plays.
STHE
of
NORTH -AROLINA
at CHAPEL HILL
is now accepting appli-
cations f o r 1977 -78
from outstanding stu-
dents at University of
Michigan for the MBA
program.
FOR INFORMATION
WRITE TO:
THE MBA PROGRAM
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION
CARROLL HALL 012-A
UNIVERSITY OF
NORTH CAROLINA
CHAPEL HILL,
NORTH CAROLINA 27S 14
TONIGHT AT 7 & 9
OPEN 6:45

k0

I

I1vil :

TICKETS 54:50. Availoble at Mich. Union Box
Cffice, (10 a.m -5 p.m. l, schoolkid's Records
and both Discount Records.
Informaton: 7631 107

J1

HAPPENINGS

I s':

I

Order your subscription today!
Phone 764-0558

iUNiGH I Al /:UU&y:IU
OPEN 6:45

WEDNESDAY
NOSTALGIA NIGHT
Dane to the original sounds of the
IG BAND ERA

50's

and 60's'

Put on Your "Saddle Shoes" and "Bobbie Socks" and Hop
on Over to the Blue Frogge! Have a Party with Your
Friends!!!
Better Yet, Come for One of Our
CANDLELIGHT-SUPPERS.
FREE BALLROOM DANCING LESSONS at 8 p.m.
by Wendy Schacknow of Art Worlds
TUESDAY-IS LADIES' NIGHT!
LADIES ADMITTED FREE
AM Een AfiL

NEWS FROM THE
MAJOR EVENTS OFFICE
After an exciting week of Eagles-mania around
this campus concerning their November 12th ap-
pearance we thought you would be interested in
hearing what shows didn't come through this
season. We had hoped to be able to announce
that Chicago would give a concert here in
November, but they didn't want a competing
show so close to the Detroit concert which hasn't
been sold out. . . . Hall and Oates won't be able
to perform for us this term because Hill was
booked solid the week their tour came near us.
We lose many of 'your favorites due to the hall
availability problem. . . . Beach Boys negotia-
tions came to an abrupt halt when somebody in
the group got hepatitis and all dates were can-
celled. . . . We were talking with Stevie Wonder's
manager last week about concert possibilities.
Stevie's doing to tour Europe this winter, then

Eclipse Jazz presents .. .
AN EVENING OF BIG BAND JAZZ, with Thad Jones/
Mel Lewis Orchestra Nov.'6, MichiganLeague Ballroom
at 7:30 and 10 P.M. Tickets are $4.50 and on sale at
the Michigan Union Box Office, Schoolkids Records, and,
both Ann Arbor Discount Records. Inforamtion: 763-
1 107.
SOPH SHOW '76
Presents a Musical Comedy, "HOW TO SUCCEED IN
BUSINESS WITHOUT REALLY TRYING." Performances:
Thur., Dec. 9; Fri., Dec. 10; Sat., Dec. 11 in Lydia ,
Mendelssohn Theater. Tickets go on sale Nov. 7. The
event of the year!
CAMELOT
the most exciting theater event of the season, opens
this week. Performances are the evenings of the 4, 5,
6, 7, 10, 11, 12, & 13, with a matinee on the 7th.
Advance tickets sale have left the 5th, 12th, and 13th,
almost sold out, so you should buy your tickets soon.
As an added bonus for students, we have opened the
6th as a one-price, general admission performance. So
qo over to Mendelssohn Theater from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
or until 8 p.m. the nights of the performance and get
your tickets to the UAC MUSKET/MM Productions pres-
entation of CAMELOT!
MUSKET
rneeds Directors, Designers and Staff for its Spring
Musical. Here's your chance to direct or design a major
Power Center oroduction! Apply at UAC, 2nd floor,
Michigan Union by Wed., November17.
THE PRINT SHOP-
Lowest Prices on Campus!
The Print Shop will make high-quality posters for you
at low, low prices! $18 for 30 posters on heavy weight,
colored paper, 500 mimeographed copies for $8.97.
Call 763-1 107 or Andy at 994-6418
UAC T-SHIRTS
The ones "Bernie" wears ... $3.50 at Michigan Union
Box Office.
UAC Mediatrics presents.
THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR, Fri. and Sat, night at
7 and 9:30 p.m. at the Not. Sci. Auditorium. Admis-
sion: $1.25.

I

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a paramount picture
41" incobor

1(11 Ia
1,

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TONIGHT 7 & 9; OPEN 6:45

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