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October 31, 1976 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-31

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~unddy, Uctober ~ I ~ 119 f~> THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday October 31, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Page Seven

Looking

back with Mo

Udal

I

(Continued fronm Page 4 primary. "But I made some
Flying to Troy, Udall is a mistakes. If I had taken a day'
bit hesitant to start thinking from Connecticut I could have
about "What ifs." "If you give won Michigan; if I had taken a1
me hindsight, you've got to day from Michigan I could have
give it to Carter, too," he says. won Connecticut."{ He stops;
But, briefly, he allows him- short and points to the land-
self to get caught up in a lit- scape patterns below. "The
tie history. ct ok ra rmu ee
"I was way behind in Michi- city looks great from up here
gan but I could feel the gap 1 love flying."
closing, so I concentrated a lot: With a little prodding, heI
of my efforts here," he re- takes his mind off the airplane'
calls, thinking back to the state ride and agrees to concentrate,
LUNCH-DISCUSSION Tuesday noon, Nov. 2 ;
"THE COLOMBIAN INDIANS:
WESTERN POWER & CULTURAL CRISIS"
Speaker: GONZALO CASTILLO-CARDENAS
who has done. action-oriented research and community
organization among Colombian Indian and Peasant Com-
munities.
at the
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER
921 Church;
LUNCH (75c) is prepared & served by Church Women
United.

one more time, on the cam-1
paign. Does he miss it?t
He crosses his gangly legs,
kicking the seat in front of
him, and sets down a handful of
press briefings.
"You know, there was a lot;t
of warmth and friendship and
emotion and a lot of that I hate
to see go. The deadly physical
and mental and emotional drag;
of the whole thing I can't say'
I miss. Looking back you tend
to forget the unpleasant aspects
and maximize the good times;
and good feelings that you had.1

But I don't regret doing it. I
wouldn't want to do it every
year, but I doubt that that
would ever come about any-
way. I think if Carter wins he's
in for eight years, and after
that you've got new political
alignments, and I . .
He pauses again and, like a
magnet, the scene below draws
his glance toward the window.
"These planes sure are choppy'
but I've kind of gotten used to
them over these past few
month."

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING QUICK RESULTS

paid political adv.
Experience Thai C'ounts
GEORGE STEEH, a native of Washtenaw County, is a
graduate of the University of Michigan Law School.
He had experience in the Genesee County Prosecutor's
Office, the best in the state and one of the finest in the
nation. He rose quickly to the position of Senior Assistant
Prosecuting Attorney and held one. of three policy-making
positions among 31 assistant prosecutors.
He has had extensive experience in all aspects of a modern
prosecutor's office, including felony and misdemeanor trials
and appeals, probate, civil, and juvenile court work.
Most importantly, he effectively managed an Economic
Crime Unit with a staff and case load more than twice as
large as the entire Washtenaw County Prosecutor's office.
Under STEEH'S leadership, the unit gained national ac-
claim from criminal justice professionals and the news
media, including national CBS News.
STEEH is a recognized leader in developing innovative
approaches to confront the crime problem. He helped
develop a rape crisis center, victim assistance programs
for se.xual assault victims, a community-based crime pre-
vention program, and a budget and credit counseling pro-
gram. He is the only law enforcement representative from
the state of Michigan on the Notional Economic Crime
Project. He is an organizer of a national project to act on
the special crime prbblems of senior citizens,
GEORGE STEEH will bring a total commitment to the job.
He will provide the leadership and action we need from
our prosecuting attorney.
VOTE
GEORGE
~~ST
DEMOCRAT f-
PROSECUTIAG AiuiRNEY
Paid for by Steeh for Prosecuting Attorney

tiK>
v:' ,.
' 4

A PERSONAL CflOICE
PURSELL FOR CONGRESS
"Over a year ago, I was faced with the critical need to deal
with two state agencies in resolution of a local
problem. Dealing with one state agency is no
easy matter, and dealing with two only com-
pounds the issue.
"I was introduced to Sen. Pursell because he
is on the Appropriations Committee and would
be in the best position to ask the kind of ques-
tions and seek the solutions we needed.
"Sen. Pursell immediately agreed to work with
us on the problem, despite the fact I was not one
of his constituents, and was willing to drive down
here to talk with us. He got positive action
started within two weeks, where we had been try-
ing to get some kind of solution for months. His
efforts have been in-depth and are continuing.
"This, to me, is the chief characteristric of an
effective legislator and why I HAVE CHOSEN TO
SUPPORT SEN. PURSELL IN HIS EFFORTS TO
REPRESENT THE 2nd CONGRESSIONAL DIS-
TRICT,"
-Hazel M. Turner '.:

ANN ArCORo

CARL PURSELL
A respected State Senator
He'll be a responsive
local Congressman.

i

. / Y

SELL

FOR THE PUSLIC GOOD
WITHOUT REGARD FOR PERSONAL GAIN
PAID POL ADV. Paid for i, Purseil-Cugress Committ

v

Serving North Central Ann Arbor-District 14

McCARTHY SAYS
HE DOESN'T CARE IF HIS VOTES
HELP RE-ELECT FORD.
WE DO.

SEE

JIMMY CARTER

AND

WALTER ,MONDALE
MONDAY, NOVL 1
IMA AUDITORIUM, FLINT 9 p m.
Free Buses Leaving Michigan Union 7:30

PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT

74

Eight years ago we were
working against a cruel, illegal
war and an unresponsive gov-
ernment. We called for a candi-
date to lead us in the Democratic
primaries. When those we first
turned to declined our call, an-
other answered. Our leaflets
said, "He gave America new
hope."
We continued to follow him
when others entered the cam-
paign. We believed that his
courage would not serve as an
example if we shunted him
aside once the task of defeating
an incumbent President had
been accomplished. We followed
him to Chicago and beyond;
few of us transferred' our ener-
gies to the nominee of our party
in 1968.
So it is with sadness that we
reject the call from that man now.
Eugene McCarthy is running for
President as an independent,
and we cannot support him.
We have the greatest respect
for Eugene McCarthy. Some of
us are his friends. He is a man
of intelligence, poetry, wisdom
and wit. We know that he-and
we who worked in the same
cause-did not get a fair shot
at the nomination in 1968; the
delegate selection process was
stacked against any challenger,
But in 1968 we began the
process of reforming the Demo-
cratic party, ending the war and
building a new political constitu-
ency.
Some of us worked in Mc-
Carthy's brief campaign for the
Democratic nomination in 1972.
Some of us would have preferred
"".3-a Azker r si Mass.
e BackmanOre
er Barnesca,!,
c ve Boos eser, Na'i St af
Bro w tar Staff
,Q a. TA -

to have McCarthy as the nomi-
nee of our party in '1976. Many
of us did support candidates
other than Jimmy Carter, and we
lost.
In 1976 we had the most open
nominating process ever. The
people voted in primary after
primary and in local caucuses
all over the country. McCarthy
did not compete. In 1968 we
called McCarthy "THE PEO-
PLE'S CHOICE." This year the
people chose Jimmy Carter.
We have a healthy skepticism
toward our political system.
Most of us have worked in the
movement against the Vietnam
war, for civil rights, against gov-
ernment-sponsored subversion
abroad and spying at home. But
our ideas are now welcome in
the Democratic party. The Demo-
cratic candidate is running on a
platform some of us helped
write. He is intelligent and a tal-
ented administrator. His opposi-
tion to the precipitous use of
nuclear power, to indiscriminate
strip-mining and dam-building,
to American support for dicta-
torships abroad, to the B-1
bomber, and to America's be-
coming the arms merchant of
the world, as well as his stance
on the issues of jobs and tax
reform, make him a candidate
we can support.
Many of McCarthy's ideas still
make sense; his thinking has al-
ready permeated our party and
should be welcome in any Dem-
ocratic administration; certainly
it will not be in a Ford adminis-
tration. But he knows he will not
be elected President in 1976.
Don Green, Nat'l Staff
Gene G~onrnan, Natl Staff
Jerome Grossman, Mass.
Reo. Mike Harrington,sMass.
Michael Harrington, N.Y.

The question, then, is who will
be elected.
McCARTHY SAYS HE
DOESN'T CARE IF HIS VOTES
HELP RE-ELECT FORD.
We do. We are not cynical
enough to believe that both can-
didates and the groups they rep-
resent are alike.
We have largely achieved our
goal of 1968 of opening up the
Democratic party. We have be-
gun the task of reforming Con-
gress. If we are to have ct
chance to put our ideas into ef-
fect, we must have a Democratic
President.
The complexion of a Ford ad-
ministration, Ford appointments,
the actions of agencies and de-
partments under Ford will take
us further from our goal of a just
'ociety dealing with the nations
of the world as a friend rather
than an empire-builder.
With Democratic majorities,
with many new members and
new leadership in the House and
Senate-and with a Democratic
administration-we can make a
new start toward this goal.
After eight years of Nixon-Ford,
it would be tragic to let this
chance slip away.
The effect of voting for Gene
McCarthy this year is to make
it more likely that Ford will
again be our President.
We, former 1988 campaign
workers and supporters of
Eugene McCarthy, urge others
who were with us in 1968 and
in other struggles over the years
to join us in voting for the
Carter-Mondale ticket.
Greg Movsesyan, Calif.
Charles Negaro, Nati Staff
John S. O'Sull~ivan, Nat'l Staff
Maryloulse Oaes Palmer, Nati Staff
Anthonv T. Podesta, Nati Staff

The Republican Teamster Candidate Says:
"I don't agree with the $5.00 Ordinance. It circumvents State

i

you KNOW
1JUANA !s
AGA INS
THE LAW,
,t
.s ..clY .f

Statutes."
KEEP PROGRESSIVE
LAW ENFORCEMENT
IN WASH TENAW COUNTY
RE-ELECT
SHERIFF ,POSTILL
Anw - w -r.

IFll

lii

I

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