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October 30, 1976 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, OctobL*r 30, 1976

F THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Saturck~, October 30, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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SURVEY RESULTS:
Returnables are

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

cheaper

WASHINGTON ( - A soft tested in Congress next year. Nationwide, the savings per "THROWAWAY containers, in
drink in a refillable bottle costs The League of Women Voters refillable ranged from one to addition to adding to the pur-
an average of five cents less found that a six-pack of soft 10 -cents per container of up to chase price of beverages, result
than in a throwaway bottle or drinks in 7- to 16-ounce refillablel 16 ounces when purchased in in increased quantities of solid
can. Beer in returnable con- bottles costs about. 30 cents less six- or eight-packs. The range waste that must be collected andl
tainers costs $2 a case less than than the same size of throwaway on quart bottles was from 14 to disposed. Furthermore, one-way
a case of throwaways. containers. The biggest saving 18 cents. bottles and cans form a signifi-
Those are the key findings of potential is for users of 32-ounce The survey showed that a beer cant portion of the items littered
a 28-city survey conducted by soft drinks: refillables cost an drinker could expect to spend annually. .
the League of Women Voters average of 16.8 cents less than from 30 cents to $2 a case less "Beverage containers that are
and announced yesterday by the throwaways. for beer purchased in refillable used a single time also consume
Environmental P r o t e c t i o n Of 37 direct comparisons, all containers. The saving for pre- more nonrenewable materials
Ofnc. smium beer would be slightlyan eerytndobvag
THE STUDY provides further but one found refillable bottles le m oand energy than do beverage
ammunition for groups seekin were cheaper. The 37th, at a HOWEVER, the League found reuser
to ban throwaway bottles and market in San Francisco, had a that beer in refillables is avail-e d
cans to save energy and protect 28-ounce refillable bottle of gin- able in only a few areas. An in- Earlier this mongi, a report
the environment. Voters in five ger ale at the same price as a depth survey of the metropolitan commissioned by the .'ederal
states-including Michigan-will disposable. Washington area found refillable Energy Administration con:.lud-
be asked to decide whether to THE BIGGEST price spread beer bottles available at 37.5 ed that banning disposable
adopt laws or constitutional between the two types of con- per cent of stores in the city, bottles and cans could cut the
amendments designed to dis- tainers was found in Roseville, 38.4 per cent in suburban Vir- beverage industry's energy
courage throwaway containers Minn., where a quart of 7-Up in ginia and 20.6 per cent of outlets needs by 44 per cent, saving! the
either through outright bans or a refillable bottle was 66.7 per in suburban Maryland. equivalent of 81,000 barrels of
economic incentives. The issue cent cheaper than in a throw- By contrast, the survey found oil per day.
is expected to be hotly con- away. refillable bottles of soft drinks
generally available across the
United States, although in some
- areas there is a limit on sizesgf
x.vand flavors. I
Inn announcing the results of U" 10fWerl
the survey, the EPA cited some
of the arguments for banning
throwaway bottles and cans: - __
' ~PAID POLITICAL ADvERTISEMENT

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Well... for the third
year in a row
education
gets a smaller
part of our
state budget. I wonder why.

AP PI
Woman's best friend r
Chip, cocker spaniel owned by Andrea Smalley, I5, of Mt.
Pleasant, takes the paper out of mail box before delivering it
to his owner's house. Andrea says Chip developed the skill
on his own but is often "rewarded" for the service.
Paperfback prices
-reach record high
By The AssociatedPress spending more to buy the rights
Higher paper costs and bigger to best-selling novels. "The
advances paid to authors for enormous advances we pay ae
blockbuster novels have boosted none reason for the increases,
the price of paperback books to said a ;spokesman for Dell pub-
record levels. But some industry lishing Co. "We just paid $200,-
spokespersons say the increases ob6 for one book."I
have leveled off. The sheer size of some of the
Maeny paperbacksareo w most popular volumes also hasI
selling for $2 and more, although contribtuted to the cost. Shogun,
you can find a few volumes for b e Clave s. fo
as little as 75 cents if you hit'by James Clavell, sells for $2.75
upon something that has been in the paerback edition publish-
in stock for several years. ed by Dell. "It's alormous,"
CHARLES Williams, vice pres- said the spokesman. "It's almost
ident for marketing of PockettWilliams said he did not think
Books, Inc., says his company's over-all sales of paperbacks had
paperbacks now range from 75 i been hurt by higher prices. "The
cents (for the old stock) to $2.95 public understands," he said.
(for two items), with an average But he added that the company
book selling for $1.75 to $1.80. e
But Williams, citing increasedG recognized that certain cate-
labor cWsts and paper prices asd gories of books might sell better1
laborcost andpape pries I if the price were lower.
the two "obvious" causes of the
cost spiral, said that the spiral ANOTHER spokesperson said
had stopped. "We're probably the marked-down v o l u m e s,
going to do more $1.25-$1.50 known in the business as re-
books in the next six months mainders, are usually books for
than in the previous six which the demand has already
months." declined rather than current ;
THE PUBLISHERS also are best sellers.

Maybe they have
something they think is
more important than
education...

I wonder what
it could be.
IC II
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U-

If you are in the mood for a scenic drive, filling meal
and cozy, rustic atmosphere, the Lord Fox restaurant is for
you.
The 2i mile drive out Plymouth Road from North Cam-
pus is especially beautiful in the fall. Indoors, the atmosphere
is a mixture of a fisherman's wharf and a warm country
home. Tables are covered with genuine leather and lobster
traps hang from the rafters.
On weekends, all three levels of the restaurant are packed.

Because the Lord Fox does not take reservations you may
be directed to the pine-panelled basement lounge for cock-
tails, while waiting to be seated for dinner. If you are luc1y,
as we were, you may view the owner's wine cellar,:with its
vintage Bourdeaux, Beaujolais and Moselles. The Lord Fox
offers one of the most extensive and attractive wine lists in
the state.
Once you are seated, you'll forgive the wait. The menu's
fare ranges from chicken and beef to seafood. Appetizers
and desserts are a la carte; however, the main course in-
cludes vegetable or potato, bread and a "tote your own"
salad bar. The salad bar features home-made dressings and'
several unusual offerings including pickled beets and mace-
roni salad. The entrees include a large number of seafood
items. The Fisherman's Platter is a must for any fish lover.
It consists of a lobster tail, frog legs, scallops, oysters,
clams and shrimps. For the meat-eater, there are many
choice cuts of steak to choose from. The El Zorro steak,
served with an authentic Spanish cleaver is a specialty, as
well as the Prime Rib. "Farm Fried Chicken" is& also a
house offering.
Appetizers range from the exotic caviar and champagne,
Oysters Rockefeller and Escargot to a hearty clam chowder
and French Onion Soup. If you have room, the dessert selec-
tion is incredible. Homemade pies, among them a perfect
pecan confection, Casatta cake laced with liqueur, peach
melba, cannolis and cheese and fruit are just a few. Unusual
coffees and teas are served to complement your meal.
If you want excellent food in a congenial atmosphere, the
Lord Fox is the place to go. Prices are competitive with
other fine dining establishments but you need not dress-up
to be comfortable. Owner Ray Coppa believes in pleasing the
customer and does so with homecooked disles that look
as good as they taste. His attention to detail reflects in the
water itself; fresh from the well. His efforts are rewarded
in a steady clientele.
The Lord Fox is open weekdays and Saturdays from 410
p.m. and Sundays from 3-8:30 p.m. Banquet facilities are
available upstairs. For a meal you'll rernember, drive out
to 5400 Plymouth Road, but go with an empty stomach so
you can sample all the delights Ray and his staff have to
offer.

'1/1

hfe AwlQSo

Chef Freddie Morris deftly handles a couple live lobsters
the way he has been doing it at the Lord Fox for the last
ten years.
1 14 EWshDOWNTOWNt
aim 114 E. Washington

;: -, 665-3231

w~s

BICYCLE JIM'S
Featuring DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES, and now
FROZEN YOGURT!
Happy Hour Mkon. 'Fri. 3-6
OPEN: M-Th until 12 and
F-Sat. until 2
Sun. until 10
1301 S. UNIVERSITY

665-2650

Complete Italian-American Menu
ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET DINNERS

WEDS.
SEAFOOD BUFFET
Adults-$4.95
Children-$2.99

SUNDAY
ITALIAN BUFFET
Adults--$3.49
Children-$1.49

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Nothing
is more
important
r Michigan
than the
education
our people.
Nothing.

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3020 Packard
(at Platt)

THE LORD FO
ANN ARBOR'S FINEST DINING -
We offer a very wide selection of fresh seafood items,
a distinguished wine list and cellar, tableside des-
serts, and tasteful service in a picturesque country
setting.

Chinese and Korean Cuisine
asual Dining Room 971-6442

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
. .".J~:s:...:.ap .. ...l .-- L:;;;: ::.
Sat-urday, October 30, 1976 1 at Union, proceeds to Stadium,
noon.
DAY CALENDAR Football: U-M vs. Minnesota, Sta-
Tennis: U-M, Mich. State, Purdue, dium, 1:30 p.m.
Varsity Courts; 9 a.m. Homecoming: "Masquerade Disco,"
WUOM: Open House, 5th f. LSA, Union Ballroom, 9 p.m.
10 a.m. Ark: David Amram, Ray Mantiila,
Mudbowl '76: SAE vs. Phid Delta 1421 Hill St., 9:30 p.m.
Theta, S. Univ. & Washtenaw, 10:30 ------ - ---- --
a.m,
F eld Hockey: U-M vs. Olivet,.
Ferry Field, 11 a m.
Homecomi ng 76 Parade: Begins
Jar
Kla
VINTAGE
WINES
at Retail Prices

carry-out Service
Banquet Facilities

HOURS:
M-S: 12-2 p.m.
5-9 p.m.
Closed Sunday

5400 PLYMOUTH ROAD

668-9387

14-b CaMPAIR114 LCt1. ML+U4A*M_

m

paid political advertisement

iet4
ver,
)r

203 E.
WASHINGTON
NO 8-8987
IMPORTED AND
j dR EDOMSTECS&
It ESTAU 'AN 1COCKTAILS&
HOURS: Wed Thurs., Fri. 4 p.m.-midnight
Saturday 4-10p.m.
Sunday 11:30 a.m.-8 p.m.
Closed Mon.-Tues.
PRETZEL BELL
.. . .. .

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tia"Yrmrnnrrrr a err:rtix rrrii nexr

The world's finest
domestic and
imported wines
at a very
reasonable price
1321 S.
University
769-1744

M
.

DINING OUT

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