100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 29, 1976 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Fridv. rtnOr q T()7

U A.. jgar, . *..-y, 7 ~ i

-I L7, 171

°I

Paid political advertisement
RETAIN
FULTON EAGLIN
WASHTENAW COMMUNITY COLLEGE TRUSTEE
B.A.-Eastern Michigan University
Law Degree--Hfayard Law School
Non-partisan Ballot
Nov. 2, 1976
Paid for by Eaglin for WCC Trustee Committee

UNIVERSITY OFEMICHIGAN
FOLKLORE SOCIETY (UMFS)
"OPENHOUSE"
SINGARDUND
PENDLETON ROOM
Michigan Union
SAT., OCT. 30
7:30-11:00 p.m.
Bring Instruments and Songs
Refreshments FREE

i

Local swine flu inoculation schedule sett

(Continued from PageI1) son for increased public skep- or older with chronic conditions'I
High School, 2727 Fuller Road, ticism of the program due to such as diabetes and heart and
and at Forsythe Junior High deaths among elderly people lung diseases.
School, 1655 Newport Road. who received the vaccine ear- These persons should consult!
To begin the program, the lier this month. a physician or the health serv-
Department received 54,500 "There is an average of 14 ice to receive the bivalent vac-
doses of whole virus vaccine deaths per one hundred thous- cine, which is a combinationI
last Friday and can obtain more and per day in people over the of the swine flu and A VictoriaI
if it is needed. age of 65," Monto stated. "If vaccine.
you vaccinate thousands and Healthy adults over the age of
"WE JUST DON'T know thousands in this age group, 18 inoculated with agdose of
what type of response we'll you're going to get some whole virus monovalent flu;
get," stated Yarmain. "It deaths." vaccine can be expected to de-
could be 50 per cent, it could be eo prtcieaibds.f
90 per cent." THE SWINE FLU vaccine of- velop protective antibodies. If
Dr. Arnold Monto, who is in- fered at the public clinics results of further trials indicate
volved in influenza research at not specifically recommended alsecond dose wil2be benefic-
the University Epidemiology De- for high risk persons - those age, it will be recommended at
partment, feels there is no rea- over 65 and individuals 18 years ga later date.r
FRI.-SAT.-SUN. $3.00
RCA RECORD'S RE-ELECT DR. PH
TO THE WASH TEN
COL LEGE BO A R
DAVIDCOLG
For the past six years, Dr. We
has worked energetically to:
preserve local control a
Public Community College
I WfRAY MANTILLA _mnif Cnnc nttn

I

STUDENTS wishing to learn
more about the effort to prevent
an outbreak of swine influenza
are invited to attend a special
conference on this issue today
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the.
Thomas Francis auditorium. A
schedule of speakers is avail-
able at the School of Public
Health.
Also, those wishing to volun-
teer their services in helping

Esch
blasts
Riteg le 's
votes
(Continued from Page 1)

to run the campuss
inoculation program
contact Janes Jacobs
County Health Depar
973-1488 or 973-1460.

Paid Pol.

ILLIP G. WEL
4AW COMM UN
D OF TRUSTEE
Als
ind autonomy for Michic
les.
policies of Michigan t

swine flu
should
s at the
tment at
Adv.
LS
ITY
'S
gan's
.am-
all
trict.
naw
Irity.
aith-
ON,
LS

(FANTISSIMO!!)

David Amram whote the music for "Spendor In The
Grass," the "Manchurian Candidate," "After The
Fall," "J.B." and the first beatnik film, "Pull My Daisy"
(with Andy Warhol & Jack Kerovac). He was the first
resident composer with the N.Y. Philharmonic, used to
jam with Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, plays
jazz piano, French horn, Pakistani flute, and is a
master of the improvised lyric.

u oeges so Ta al c leoser
-support a re-districting plan that would bring
citizens of the state into a community college disc
-modernize and update the faciilties of Washte
Community College while emphasizing fiscal integ
-increase services and involvement of the college w
in the community.
COMMITTEE TO RE-ELECT PHILLIP G. WELLS
HAROLD COOLEY, JOHN W. FINN, ROBERT L. GORD
ROBERT K. GREEN, JOHN A. MASON
RE-ELECT DR. PHILLIP 6. WELl

1421 Hill

8:30

761-1451

" "

PD. POL. ADV.
Prosecutor Fails To Show
For Court-Cases Dismissed
FILE No. CR15697: Defendant charged with larceny.
Frosecutor tated to show for court-CASE DISMIWEU.
FILE 1o. CR15497: Defendant charged with malicious
destruction of a building and illegal entry. Prosecutor
failed to show for court-CASE MlSED.
FILE No. CR15909: Defendant charged with larceny.
Prosecutor failed to show for court-CASE DISMISSED.
FILE No. CR15704: Defendant charged with malicious
destruction of property. Prosecutor failed to show for
court-CASE DISMISSED.
FILE No. CR15868: Defendant charged with larceny.
Prosecutor failed to show for court-CASE DISMISSED.
FILE No. CR15861: Defendant charged as a disorderly
person. Prosecutor foiled to show for court-CASE DIS
MISSED.
FILE No. CR12911: Defendant charged with larceny,
Prosecutor failed to show for court-CASE DISMISSED.
FILE No. CR15926: Defendant charged with accousting
and soliciting. Prosecutor failed to show for court.-
CASE DISMISSED.
FILE No. CR15848: Defendant charged with larceny.
Prosecutor failed to show for court-CASE DISMISSED.
Incredible? It happened as recently as August 31,
1976. Wasteful? The cost to county taxpayers for this
incompetence is impossible to calculate-courts; po-
lice, court-appointed attorneys, witnesses, and on and
on.
This waste, mismanagement and unprofessional conduct
must stop.
VOTE
GEORGE
STEEH
DEMOCRAT for
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY

Esch also talked about Michi-
gan's unemployment rate -
one of the highest intthe coun-
try. He blamed it on the malap-
portionment of federal funds
and pointed to legislation he has
sponsored as evidence of his
committment to getting more
money.
ESCH POINTED to his au-
thorship of the Comprehensive
Employment and Training Act
(CETA), which gave Michigan
about a 30 per cent increase in
federal funds for jobs, especial-
ly to provide "essential serv-
ices" like police and fire pro-
tection for the city of Detroit.
Another piece of legislation he
snonsored was the youth em-
plovment bill which would pro-
vide money to put young peo-
ple back to work. President
Ford has onnosed the bill, but
Esch said, "We about have the
president convinced . . . We
almost got it into the State of
the Union message."~
In another move that would
help boost the state's economy,
Esch said he has been influen-
tial in the ongoing attempt to
locate the Solar Institute, which
does solar energy research, in
Michigan.
He said this would provide
1,500 jobs immediately and
would have the prospect of
creating a new industry in the
state.
ESCH ALSO contended that
his support of the B4 bomber
would not be as costly as Riegle
has charged. "I think we can
afford it if we are very care-
f0l in terms of costs. What we
neod to do is give the next
nresident . . . an opportunity to
wage a conventional war. That's
one of the priorities I'm willing
to wit tin with."
In a year when most candi-
dates are campaigning hard
against the increasing size of
the federal government, Esch
has said many times that he is
orly against its "inefficiency".
He maintained, "We have to
have an activist kind of gov-
errimpnt. You've got to make
ire that we. have an education-
al system for everyone."
Other areas that deserve gov-
erinent actiont, he said, in-
clide job training and mass
transit.
The. dynamics of artificial
satellites were first propounded
by Sir Isaac Newton.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No. 44
Friday, October 29, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
ohone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor,: Michigan 48109.
Published d a 11y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters): $13 by mall outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

PD. POL. ADV.

Zolton
Ferency

The Michigan judiciary needs
new life.
Most candidates for S u p r e m e
Court offer an outworn mixture of
platitudes and simplistic solutions.
One candidate is different
Zolton Ferency.
Zolton Ferency has spent a life-
time fighting for change- as an
attorney, an educator and a politi-
cal activist. When others chose to
remain safe and silent, Ferency
spoke out on the issues that count.
VIETNAM-Ferency was the first
Democratic Party leader in the no-
tion to suggest an end to the dis-

. . . clear, honest,
uncompromising
champion for
Justice
UTILITIES-When gas and electric
bills began to soar, Ferency led a
petition drive for major rate reform
and for public ownership of utilities
to protect the consumer.
DRUG LAWS-Ferency has fought
for removal of criminal penalties for
possession of drugs and other vic-
timless crimes.
GOVERNMENT SPYING- Ferency
waged a successful legal battle to
end State Police political surveil-
lance and to destroy 50,000 files
collected on alleged "subversives"
in Michigan.
The issues that confront our Su-

i

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan