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October 28, 1976 - Image 11

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-28

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Thursday, October 28, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eleven

Thursday, October 28, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Eleven

All-purpose back Rob Lytle
strives for unbeaten season

PD. POL. ADV.
ARE REPUBLICANS WORTH
37c on the dollar?

By BILL STIEG
The games are harder, the stakes higher
and the pressure greater. Rob Lytle doesn't
want to blow it.
After seven weeks and seven wins, Lytle
and his Michigan teammates are on top
of the college football world. They can
sense their national championship dream
slowly coming true.
FOR LYTLE AND THE twelve other Wol-
verine seniors, each win is another step to-
ward that goal ... and a step toward the
end of their Michigan careers.
"This is my last year, my last chance,"
said Lytle after practice yesterday. "You
see that number one ranking, and you don't
want to blow it. You don't want to make
any mistakes or have any letdowns."
Thus far, the versatile running back has
made fewer mistakes and had fewer let-
downs than perhaps any of the Wolverines.
He's gained over 170 yards in the last three
games and is easily the top rusher in the
Big Ten with a 150.7 yards per game aver-
age.
Lytle, a track sprinter, started the sea-
son at fullback - his '75 position - but
has gradually shifted back to tailback, a
more natural position for the speedster.
IT DOESN'T MATTER where he plays
- he's very effective at both spots and
doesn't prefer one over the other. For ex-
ample, against Michigan State he broke
loose for 180 yards from the fullback posi-
tion and two weeks later he gained 175 yards
primarily as a tailback.
Add to that his superior blocking talents
and even some pass receiving, and you have
"by far our best back," according to coach
Bo Schembechler. "He runs, blocks, catch-
es the ball - he does everything and does

it extremely well."
But Lytle, co-captain and strong Heisman
trophy candidate, is more concerned with
his team's success than with his own. Mich-
igan has come within one game (guess which
one) of an outright Big Ten championship
four times in the last four years.
Lytle, a Fremont, Ohio native, has been
on the varsity for the last two of those
years. He's understandably worried.
"EVERY GAME scares me a little more,
because I can feel it getting closer," he
said, referring to Michigan's better-than-ever
shot at the Big Ten and national titles.
"You can feel things closing in on you.
"The number one ranking keeps the team
up, keeps 'em going. We can see it within
our grasp. Personally, I don't want to blow
it. So now we're getting way up for every
game, because we see what we're capable
of.
As captain, Lytle takes on additional re-
sponsibilities as a leader which he typically
downplays.
"IT MAKES YOU PROUD to be the so-
called leader," he said, "but I can't really
call myself a leader. Everyone on the team
is a leader, in a way. The Michigan team
is like a big family, we're so team-oriented.
That's what makes us so good.
"My idea of leadership is to go out and
do the best I can ... not make mistakes,
keep the young guys fired up. We're play-
ing pretty good ball. But we won't really
be number one until the last poll comes
out. If we keep playing hard like we have,
and keep winning, then we can say it.
"But it won't mean much to sit back at
the end of the season and say, 'Yeah, we
were number one back at the seventh game
of the season.'"

A dollar in

1968 is worth 63c today.

CARTER supports strict enforcement of anti-trust
laws.
CARTER favors a consumer protection agency.
CARTER would adopt a monetary policy which
encourages lower interest rates.
CARTER would strive for more effective budgeting
with the goal of a balanced budget.
by 1980.
To cut INFLATION
VOTE FOR CARTEloc.
1 976 Democratic Presidential Campaign Committee Inc.

ROB LYTLE, Michigan's mustashioed marvel, cradles the
ball, eyeing the open field before him in action against
Wisconsin earlier this season. The versatile running back
has triggered top-ranked Michigan's awesome offense, run-
ning from both the tailback and fullback slots.

SPORTS OF THE DAILY
Michigan clubbers sting H rnets

Special To The DailyP
KALAMA ZOO-The
Michigan field hockey team de-1
feated Kalamazoo College, 3-0,t
here yesterday, recording theirt
fourth shutout of the season. C
Backup goalie Robin GelstonN
got her first shutout of the
year, subbing for injured start-
er Laura Pieri.
Fullback Roberta Zald
sparked a lethargic Wolver-
ine team with her first goal of
the season, giving the Blue a
1-0 halftime lead.
The second half belonged toT
Michigan as Kathi Dennis andc
Dawn Kohut finished out the:
scoring.
"We're a second - half team,"
said head coach Phyllis Ocker.
"Our passing really improved
in the last half. We really
should have scored more."
Good goaltending by Kalama-
zoo's Patti Worsley, who looked
and played like the former!
NHL great, kept those goals
from going in.
"Kalamazooo's goaltending
was good," said coach Ocker,
"but we always start out
slow. Maybe we should playI
each other for ten minutes be-
fore each game."
The Kalamazoo soccer team
provided the most vocal crowd
of the season as they chanted
and cheered with every shot on
goal.
"We were acting like it's the
football team," said a smiling!
Tom Larson, the varsity booter
who started the cheering.
All the chants went for
naught, however, as the Wol-
verines upped their season re-
cord to 6-2.
The team has two regular sea-
son games remaining before the
start of the State Tournament,
November 5-6.
The home season ends Satur-
day morning against Olivet Col-
lege. Game time isG G am.
--GREG ZOTT
Ozark No. I
NEW YORK - Danny Ozark,
who piloted the F!hVadelphia{
Phillies to the National League
East championship this season,
was named the National League
Manager of the Year by The
Associated Press yesterday.
Ozark, under fire throughout

much of 1975, survived that around the country know we
crisis and then pulled the Phil- have a modern, year-round,
lies through a September slump domed stadium," C h a r l e s
to capture the division flag, McSwigan Jr., executive direc-
the first championship for the tor of the stadium, said of the
club since the 1950 Whiz Kids new name.
won the NL pennant. -AP

-AP

* * *

* * *

pnmet renamed
PONTIAC - To the list that
includes Astrodome, Superdome
and Kingd ', add Silverdome.
Apparen the name Pontiac
Metropolitan Stadium doesn't
convey much image, so the city
council has renamed its gleam-
ing new 80,000-seat stadium
Pontiac Silverdome.
"It certainly lets everyone

Fitt picked
D A L L A S - Field Eco-
yell, chairman of the Cotton
Bowl selection committee, said
yesterday he was startled that
the Orange Bowl announced
Pittsburgh was it's No. 1 choice
and that the Florida classic
said it was going after the Pan-
thers.
Scovell said "we are sur-
prised that the Orange Bowl

appears to he extending an in-
formal invitation 26 days prior
to what we thought was the in-
vitation date. That's startling
news, indeed."
-AP
MIAMI - Dill Arnsparger,
who helped fashion the Miami
Dolphins' famed "NoName" de-
fe:se during his four years as
defensive coordinator, was re-
hired yesterday - two days
after he was fired as head
coach of the New York Giants.
Dolphins Coach Don Shula,
whose def.- - faltered this
year to the lint where it was
among the worst in the Nation-

al Football League, announced
the move at a hastily called
news conference. He said Arns-
parger would have the title of
assistant head coach.
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