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October 27, 1976 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Arts & Entertanment Wednesday,OctoberHGANDAL Page Five

AI

Marathon lan a well-told tale

By MICHAEL BROIDY S
MARATHON MAN, now play- c
ing at the Michigan Thea- m
ter, is a vividly violent and com-
pelling film based on the best-
selling novel by William Gold- h
man, who also wrote the screen- c
play.fr
Dustin Hoffman, the marathon S
man of the title, portrays Babe p
Levy, a brilliant Columbia grad- g
uate student and amateur mara- u
thon runner. The memory of th
Babe's father (presented in l
flashback), a victim of the Mc- w
)eCarthy era, continually haunts o
. ~Babe, and drives him to write
a dissertation in an attempt to t
A ,clear his father's name. S
s .FThroughout the first half of S
tthe film, director John Schles- b
singer cross-cuts from New a
York, where Babe is located,
f D
to, Paris, where an American t
agent called Scylla (Roy Schel-;S
der) is involved in some sort
of diamond trafficking; and S
finally to a South AmericanN
jungle, where an ex-Nazi con- t
centration camp "dentist" nam-M
Ws, words . . . ed Szell (Laurence Olivier) is
her husband John Shand (Steve Megis) write his op- preparing to set off for NewI
of Commons in the PTP production of Barrie's com- monds These diamonds have
ch opens tonight in the Trueblood Theatre. , previously been entrusted to
-de
ba~wllet dancerfs exel

zell's brother, who has ac-
identally been killed in an auto-
obile collision with an oil rig.
SOUND confusing? This first
alf of the film, through its
ross-cutting back and forth
rom New York to Paris to
outh America is somewhat per-
lexing, yet through Schlessin-
er's expert direction, one grad-
ally becomes aware of how
hese different characters r-
ate to each other. In a sen
e are putting together piece
f a puzzle.,
By the second half of the film,
things begin to fall into place.
cylla, it turns out, is Babe's
rother (known to Babe simply
s Doc), and works with an
spionage agent known as the
Division which handles cases
oo delicate for the FBI or CIA.
cylla is also a courier for

Director John Schlessinger
weaves this complicated tale
with such skill and finesse, that
the various holes in the plot are
barely noticeable. Schlessinger
has previously demonstrated his
talent in directing films involv-
ing detailed character studies'
(Darling, Midnight Cowboy);
with Marathon Man, Schles-
singer displays an equal amount
of skill in the thriller genre.'
"hrough a combination of fluid;
imera movement, close-ups,
ight-framing, and montage,
Schlessinger brilliantly orches-
trates some of the most violent
and hard-hitting scenes in thej
history of motion pictures. For;
example, in a scene in which'
Szell tortures Babe by drilling
into a live nerve in Babe's
tooth, one can almost experience
the intense pain we see Babe
feeling on the screen.
- OTHER scenes further dem-
onstrate Schlessinger's skill in
directing action-a fight scene

between Scylla and a Chinese
agent and a scene where Szell's
henchmen break into Babe's
apartment and kidnap him, are
as powerful as anything that's
been done in recent years. Al-
though they are almost excru-
ciatingly violent, these scenes
are not arbitrarily placed in the
film for purposes of exploita-
tion and box office. Schlessinger
wants us to feel the terror and
violence which the characters
are experiencing, and succeeds
as few directors have.
Producers Robert Evans and
Sidney Beckerman spent more
than eight million dollars in the
making of the film, and it shows'
in every detail. The acting by
Dustin Hoffman as the tortured
and bewildered student, Roy
Scheider as the mysterious'
Scylla-Doc, Laurence Olivier as
the evil Szell, and Martha Keller!
as Babe's treacherous girlfriend,
are all excellent, as is Conrad
Hall's cinematography. Master-

fully directed and brilliantly
acted, Marathon Man is a
movie you won't want to miss,
although you may never look
upon a trip to the dentist in
quite the same way again.
WAGNER FESTIVAL
IS 100 YEARS OLD
BAYREUTH, West Germany
(AP) - The Wagner Opera Fes-
tival here will be celebrating
its 100th anniversary in July.
The festival theater was in-
augurated with "Der Ring des
Nibelungen," with Richard Wag-
ner conducting.
In 1976, there will be four
performances of the "Ring,"
with Pierre Boulez conducting.
"Tristan und Isolde" will be
performed six times with Horst
Stein and Carlos Kleiber wield-
ing the baton. Stein also will
conduct the six performances
of "Parsifal."
A ceremony on July 23 will
precede the festival that will
last from July 24 to Aug. 28.

zell,
zell
Nazi
here
more

in exchange for which'
provides the namesof,
war criminals, and from
the, plot becomes even
complicated.

Wor
Kathryn Long as Maggie Wylie helps
ening speech to the British Houset
edy, What Every Woman Knows, whi4
Spanish

paid political advertisement

"U" Towers

Janet
Klaver
fr
Couinty Clerk'

By MARA BRAZER recently killed lover, the second her dead lover by a tenderly'f traditional high-heeled shoes
The audience must have left dance, El Amor Brujo proved seductive Carmelo. used for Spanish dancing, or
the Tower Center with a great to be both choreographically The finale, El Sombrero de stamp out intricate beats with
sense of elation Monday night and artistically exciting-Albert Tres Picos, a comic farce, dem- their toes and heels, often to the
after a brilliant performance Lorca did the choreography- onstrated the acting talent of accompaniment of clicking fin-
by Spain's first national ballet and technically polished, dis- Maria del Sol. She stole the gers or clapping hands. The men
company. playing the real talents of the act with her facial expressions were generally given more con-
A small company, the National company. Juan Manuel perform- and body language as the very plicated steps and turns, while
Folk Ballet of Spain formed two ed with sparkling fervor as the flirtatious yet faithful wife of a the women played complex
years ago, a synthesis of Spain's jealous ghost who sought to miller who gets herself in rhythms on their castanets,j
best dancers and choreograph- possess the spirit of his tor- amorous trouble by flirting with i skillfully coordinating s o u n d
ers. mented lover, Candelds (Cacur- the Mayor. The miller himself with movement.
EACH OF THE three pieces ra Jimenez). (Mario La Vega) showed great The scenery used was mini-
performed was different in both ;Teseeyue a ii
technique and spirit. The first, More balletic than the first style and ability with his clean mal, while the costuming was.
Suite de La Vida Breve, was the piece, the Pas de Deux were turns, jumps and quick feet. beautiful and iin Spanish tradi-
story of love gained and lost; visually stimulating with un- ONE OF THE most impressive tion. An energy and enthusiasm ~-
Ann Gonzales expressing aching usual falls and lifts. Especially things about the company was were conveyed which would
sorrow through the beautifully provocative was the scene where their use of their hands and straighten the back and lighten
fluid movements of her armsthe ghost ; seduced by Can- feet while they danced. They the step of anyone who attended
and sinuosity of her hands. delas' best friend. Wile they ;could dance delicately on the this enjoyable show.
A tale of the attempts of a dance frenziedly and passion-
gypsy girl's friends to rid her ately, Candelas is slowly freed -
of the hatigmemories *o her ; from the clutching meTmories ofIT

PAIL? PC I'. [CAL ADVU SM Ni
Keep a
woman on
the Court
of Appeals,
Judge
Dorothy
Comstock
Riley
R£"TAIN JUDG PII_ P

Democrat

ABLE, FAIR, HARD-WORKING-IT'S A COMPLICATED JOB
Klover for County Clerk Committee Jean Converse, Treas.

... ..,
s .,
k .va .w:s

Kabuki show: Deft
By MARNIE HEYN hiki-nuki (quick-change) tech-
IF ANYONE attended the Mar-|nique. And Aomino Taro, an-
tialtArts of Kabuki presenta- other samarai, sliced his way
tion at the Power Center last out of the belly of a-whale and
Thursday expecting to see di vanquished sea reptiles in lovely
sciples of martial arts expert gymnastic piles.
Bruce Lee, that person might For the second act, the troupe
have been disappointed - but presented two scenes from Ka-
certainly no one else was. The gumiyama Kokyo no Nishibie,
Kabuki road show from the Na- in which faithful servant Ohatsu
tional Theater Institute of Japan redeems the honor of the noble
put on a deft, energetic per- Iruma family and is rewarded
formance, well-designed to ac- for her loyalty. This section of
commodate American eyes, ears the concert was drawn from the
and attention spans. domestic conflict tradition of
The concert was divided into' Kabuki, and accordingly the
two sections, much as a tradi-'style was freer and more melo-
tional K a b u k i performance dramatic.
would. In the first section. the
troupe demonstrated the kata
(basic techniques) of Tachima-
wari (battle scenes from the his-
torical dramas). U

I I '*.EvE I U1
REGENTS CANDIDATE DEBATE
Gerald R. Dunn (Dem. Incumbent)
Earl D. Gabriel (Rep.)
Robert E. Nederlander (Dem.
Incumbent)
David F. Upton (Rep.)
1 P.Ms
Michigan Union Pendellon Room
SPONSORED BY:
Mad Hatter's Tea Party, Michigan Union,
LSA-Student Government, Campus Coalition

I

Ea

TONIGHT!

First, the company nerformed
different fighting patterns with
various weapons: pikes, wooden'
swords, a spear and Paper fan
combination and trincbeons."
Despite the profusion of military
hardware, the resultant effect;
was balletic, stylized conflint
rather than mayhem. A male~
battle scene followed the sam-
pler of basic Patterns: the seg-
ment from Chushingura was an
intricatelV-timed, but no less
hair-raising, leaping, slashing
swordfight. Finally, members of
the traditionally all-male cast
donned kimonos, women's wigs
and make-up for a female battle
scene; the weapons were cherry
branches and the activity was.
predictably less vigorous.
TO CONCLUDE the first sec-
tion, the company performed
four scenes from various plays,
in each of which good triumphed
over evil with the assistance of
a strange selection of weapons.
In the scene from Jiraiya Mono-,
gatari, Jiraiya transformed him-
self from toad to samurai with
a bit of imagination and the
VINTAGE
WINES
f.~ I

.. ,.
't'
f
s 4,
.,
. ,
' Y7
'.4't
..

Orchestre de Paris
DANIEL BARE NBIOM, Conductor
BERLOIZ: Love Scene from "Romeo et Juliette"
RAVEL: "Daphnis et Chloe" Suite No. 2; BRAHMS: Symphony No.1
HILL AUDITORIUM, 8:30
Tickets from $3.50-$8.50; Hill Aud. box offi e open at 7 tonight
'iUICAZVESITY
JMUSICAL8OIY

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,

BURTON TOWER, Ann Arbor

Weekdays 9-4.30, Sat. 9-12

Phone 665-3717

Julian Bream
SUPERB ENGLISH GUITARIST AND LUTENIST
SUNDAY, OCT. 31 AT 3:00 IN HILL AUDITORIUM
Without a doubt one of the most distinctive artists of our time, Mr.
Bream returns this weekend for his fifth Ann Arbor concert appearance.
His tours to nearly every country of the world, and his many fine re-
cordings have earned him a reputation par excellence in the world of
guitar.

NOTE: Rush tickets, $2 each, today 4-4:30, Hill Aud. box office

Pr

rGE6RGE DUKE BAND
. I ,The Billy Cobham / George Duke Band

SUNDAY'S PROGRAM:

FOR LUTE
ADRIAN LE ROY: Branles de Bourgonne
LUYS MILAN: Five Pieces from "El Maestro"
JOHN DOWLAND: Five Pieces

FOR GUITAR
J.S. BACH: Two Preludes
HANS WERNER HENZF: Royal Winter
Musick1976
A'U(USTIN BARRIOS: La Catedral

FRI. OCT. 291

AL

,ter rrr a ,

7:30"-10:30 PM
ROYAL OAK THEATRE

TICKETS A\'AILAJBLEf from 3.00 to M8.00, in our Burton Tow er office (hours /eow)

I

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