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October 26, 1976 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Arts& Entertainment Tuesday, October 26, 1976 Page Fie

A1MMN
A1I 4

aMaizin' Blues fun
By BILL BARBOUR
THE AMAIZIN' BLUES, in conjunction withtAthe University
of Wisconsin-La Crosse Collegiates, filled the Power Cen-
ter with show and pop music last Friday might, performing
it in a surprisingly professional way. The groups, both sing-
ing/dancing ensembles, proved themselves more than worthy
before the fickle ears of Ann Arbor.
The Collegiates opened the concert on an upbeat note
with "Don't Take Away the Music." This was very sharply
done with good contrast between energetic balladic sec-tions.
In the remainder of their program, the' group demonstrated
an ability to perform a variety of styles well. "Opus One"
and "Woodchopper's Ball" were perfect vehicles to show off
imitations of the "big band sound." Medleys such as Bohem-
i$# Rhapsody and selections from the musical Chorus Line
showed the ensemble's ability to contrast styles aid tempos.
Thi Collegiates reached their peak with a startlingly good
performance of "Country Boy" by a country trio (banjo, guitar,
bass).
IF THE GROUP had any faults, they were in the area
of solo singing (with the exception of Sue Oftehdahl's beauti-
ful rendition of "Somewhere Over the Rainbow"). Intonation
suffered on most of the 'solos, and some of the interpreta-
tions were slightly overdone. Nevertheless, La Crosse's Col-
legiates performed in an exciting and moving manner.
After an intermission, the aMaizin Blues took the stage.
The 22-member ensemble, directed by John Smith, were superb- I
ly professional and entertaining. "Magic to Do" opened the
Blues' portion of the concert on a high note featuring sharp
and exciting choreography.
This group, like the Collegiates, exhibited a mastery of
many different styles. Numbers like "Walk Him Up The Stairs"
and "Everybody Rejoice" were done at their hand clapping,
revivalistic best. Solo singing was tremendous, the most notable
of which was Steve Powell's performance of "Nothing Can1
Stop Me Now." However, the Blues were at their very best
when singing ballads, projecting a warmth scarcely heard from,
even the best choral groups.
The highlight of the evening was the ensemble's perform-
ance of Burgers and Beer, a medley of theme songs from popu-
lar beer and fast food commercials.

CONCERT AT HILL

Keith Jarrett:

Compelling

By JIM STIMSON
KEITH JARRETT wouldn't
agree with this concert re-
view.
Says Jarrett of any import-
ant human experience, "As soon
as you start to tell about it, it's
lost."
Paradoxically, the experience
of Jarrett's concert last Sat-
urdayrnight was so stirring that
I am compelled to write aboutc
it.
SA T U R D A Y afternoon
Jarrett gave a lecture on his
philosophy of music and lifeF
at the Michigan Union. That
night at Hill Auditorium he
proved that it wasn't just talk.
The music flowed from his solo
piano with a spontaneity that
made the concert a special,
perhaps unique event.
At thewafternoon discussion
Jarrett was asked, "Do you
ever feel creatively empty?"
His response: "It happens ev-
ery concert . . . I'm empty be-
fore and during a concert -
I'm a vacuum."
Jarrett announced no song
titles at the concert, and quite
likely his improvisations will
remain nameless. They had
never been performed before
and probably will never be done
again. Too many variables
'weigh on Jarrett's performance
-- the time, the place,- the audi-
ence, the instrument, to name
a few -- for a piece to be du-
plicated.
JARRETTbegan the

show with a half-hour improvis- involved in producing it. Some- asked if this experience was
ation that spanned a spectrum times one. person disappears. available only to a select few,
of musical mood and tempo. It's strange, like seeing your Jarrett replied, "It can hap-
The opening was bright and death onstage, but it can re- pen to anyone."
sunny, the music flowing with sult in something incredible." The concert Saturday night
ease and grace, before tumbling At the afternoon lecture, Jar- e last c a to h
into dischord. But just when rett told of a revelation he'd Jarrett for some time. He has
the tension and anxiety seemed had while playing in Brussels contracted to compose a sym-
at a peak, Jarrett resolved the in 1967: phnniece. and admits to be-

dissonance into harmony. The
overall effect was breathtaking.
After intermission, Jarrett
displayed some genial artistic:
temperament by requesting that
the audience all cough at once,
before he resumed playing. .Af-
ter several false starts, inter-
rupted by poorly muffled coughs
from the balcony, Jarrett start-
ed his second number. The solo
was highlighted by a section in
which the bass partactually
seemed to swell and fade as it
would on an organ.
Jarrett feels the audience
plays an important role in a
solo performance. He sees his
music as a continuous upward
spiral, with input and feedback
from the crowd fueling the as-
cent.

"I HAD THIS . . flash at
intermission. When I went out
for the last set,- I'd never felt
so free before. Having attained
thatr goal, Ircould then throw
it away."
"I don't think many per-
formersreach that stage. I
tdon't think art begins until
then," he added - but, when

}.nivtsic; prcuv~~, 41 U11L ac
ing stuck on page 24 of the
percussion part. He also plans
to release a new album, one
side with Jarrett performing
other people's works, and the
second side with other people
performing Jarrett's composi-
tions. Jarrett has been perform-
ing almost exclusively his own
works.

LUNCH--DISCUSSION

TUESDAY, Oct. 26, noon

"THE AMERICAN ELECTORATE
INI 1976"
Speaker: Prof. Warren Miller
Political Science Dept. and Director for
Political Studies, ISR,
at the
Ecumenical Campus Center
921 CHURCH
Lunch 75c is prepared and served by
Church Women United
TICKETS GO ON SALE OCT. 28

"EVEN WITH small groups
there is a vital feeling with the
audience. If there's no feeling
coming from the audience, I'mP""
~forced to play with what I have -
on stage," he says. But there:
was no shortage of positive in-
put from the enthusiastic crowd.
Jarrett - says he undergoes a
transformation when he per-
forms. "I turn into two partici-
pants. One is aware of the mu-
sic as a whole and the other is

Doily Photo by BRAD BENJAMIN
J(are t

Faculty concert shines

By OWEN GLEIBERMAN
, N UNDAY afternoon, the
School of Music presentedl
the second in its series of facul-
ty chamber concerts. As al-
ways, the faculty displayed its4
abilityto give thoroughly pro-r
fessional performances, al-
though not all the numbers
were up to this level of quali-1
ty.
The opening selection, Concer-
to Ii C for viola, harpsichord,
and strings, by Johann Michael
Haydn, was by far the most
poorly performed on the pro-1
gran. Iptonation was a problemi
throughout the entire three-
movement work, especially for
the first violin, Gustave Ros-
reels. The two violtxs often had
passages in unison, in which
the inaccurate iptopation was
marked. In addition, the harpsi-
chord, though stable at times,
was often rythmically impre-
cise, and played several runs,
sloppily.
The .soloist, Francis Bundra,,
did quite a good job - especi-
ally in the slow second move-I
ment in which he displayed a,
beautifiu singing quality. Eis
playing was clear, forceful, and.;
only slightly flawed by a few3
shifts that contained slides. ;
IN G NERAL, the perform-
ance seemed to be missing!
genuine vitality. The last move-
ment, a lively rondo, was plod-
ding, and being a somewhat
repetitious movement, lacked
the excitement that was needed
to carry it through.
The second piece was John;
Corigliona's "Poem in October,"!
a song on the Dylan Thomas
poem of the same title. The in-
strumentation included a string
quartet, several woodwinds, and!
a harpsichord, besides singer
John McCullom.
This performance contrasted
marketly with the first one, for
it was highly polished, botht
technically and musically. Th.*
players were extremely suc-
cessful in capturing the many,
moods of the composition, which
:anged from passages of light,

almost frenzied gleefulness, to In addition to the impeccable
slow ones of a deeply expres- musical performance, this selec-
sive quality. The ensemble hand- tion had the added attraction
led the fast, technical passages of being a humorous dialogue
extremely well, and encounter- between two attorneys and a
ed the meter changes with ease client. The singers performed
and amazing togetherness, their roles with a great deal
of wit, acting their roles with;
THE WOODWINDS, in particu- the help of exaggerated facial
lar, played with a lively quality expressions to which the audi-.
that was as controlled as it was ence responded appreciably.
enthusiastic. In addition to the'

excelle- re of the ensemble,
John McCollum did a magnifi-
cent job. His singing exhibited
a lovely sustained tone that was
enormously expressive and evo-
cative of the feelings in the
poem.
The next portion of the pro-
gram was devoted to songs for
a trio of two tenors and a bari-
tone. The first three, all by
Franz Joseph Haydn, were fair-
ly varied in character, and the
performance brought out every
nuance that the works pos-'
sessed. The three singers'
voices blended perfectly, pro-f
ducing a deep, rich sound. Dy-
namics were observed to the
hilt, and with a uniformity that
was striking.
The last song performed by
this group - a selection by
Anton Fischer - wasgperhaps
the high point of the program.
ART 1:
"A TASTE OF
FREEDOM"
AND
"ROLLER BABIES"
ART 11:
"KEEP ON
TRUCKING",
AND
"MY MASTER,
MY LOVE
Art Theaters
31 N. WASUINGTON
YPSILANTI - 4824300

FINALLY, the group perform-
ed a modern dance number,
done by Gay Delanghe andI
Robert Handler. A futuristic
dance denicting the creation of
Adam and Eve, it was accom-
panied by an electronic piece'
of Ussachevsky.
The performance of Delanghe
was unfortunately not matched
by that of her partner, who
seemed to lack her expressive

quality. H: seemed, in general,
lackluster, and - devoid of the
energy that Delanghe display-
ed.
The choreography, though not
particularly original, flowed
very nicely. Also, its futuristic
quality matched the music very
well.
The dance number seemed
strangely out of place in the
context of this particular con-
cert. However, the afternoon-
by virtue of the middle two per-
formances - was quite satis-
fying; and judging by the audi-
ence's enthusiastic response,
they felt so too.
Special Attractions
Performing
Oedipus
"Nobility, Swiftness
and Horror!"
"Explosiv*yMoving"
Nov. 5&6 8:30pm
Aid
The 'Taming
of theShrew
"BoisterousIrreverent,
Knockabout Version"
"Baw y, Jyu,& Fkaf"
Nov. 7 2&8pm
PowerCenter
Tickets avalable at ~PPTcetlOlffice
( Mendelssohn Theatre Lobby, Mon -Fn. 10. 1, 2 5
I F~or ,storrnation Call:764-0450

(Martin Scorsese, 1975)

Scorsese's surprise foilow-uj to MEAN' STREETS was this poignant
story of a widow in the Southwest struggling to assert herself,
build a new life and care for her young son. Despite Scorsese"s
sensitivity, Ellen Burstyn's Academy Award winning performance
steals the show, causing the New York Times to write, "She
grabs at us as maybe only two other American screen actresses
of her generation . . She's Great!" Kris Kristofferson, Harvey
Keitel, Diane Ladd.

ANN AUIICUD [ELMCC-=CU
....* ..e S S S @ @ *O@S S S eseeeaeee e e
TON'GHT! Martin Scorsese Festival
ALICE DOESN'T LIVE
HERE ANYMORE

7 & 9

I

$1.25-AUD. A, ANGELL HALL

__

I
U

11

TWO SHOWS -7:30 and 10'P.M.
TICKETS 54:50. Available at Mich. Union Box
Office, (10 a.rm-5 p.m. I, Schoolkid's Records
and both Discount Records.
Information 763-1107
CHARLES LAUGHTON as 1939
wTHE HUNCHBACK-
OF NOTRE"E DAME
After ,Lon Chaney's famous portrayal of the title role, it
took nerve for RKO to make this sound version of the
romantic classic by Victor Hugo, but, in Laughton, they
found a perfect Quasimodo. "Even more horrendous" said
the New York Times. Also starring Maureen O'Hara and
Cedric Hardwicke.
WED: Bergman's THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY
CINEMA GUILD :TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
7:00E&A9:05 Admssin$.25

Are You Concerned

About...
HIGH TUITION?
HIGH DORM RENT?
THE DORM LOTTERY?
STAFF BENEFITS?
UNION DECERTIFICATION?
UNION RECERTIFICATION?
THE 18-YEAR-OLD DRINKING
AGE?
. THEN ASK A REGENT ABOUT IT!
REPUBLICAN & DEMOCRATIC
REGENTS' CANDIDATE DEBATE
7 P.M. WED., OCT. 27
MICHIGAN UNION, PENDLETON ARTS ROOM
(2nd. FLOOR)
Sponsored by: Mad Hatter's Tea Party
Michigan Union
LSA-Student Government
Campus Coalition

i
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TRY DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

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26mor rk-

7

Tuesday Night
is
LADIES' NIGHT
Free Admission for ladies

r
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TONIGHT is
\DIES' IGHT
NO COVER CHARGE FOR LADIES
*
Appearing Tonight thru Oct. 30

-1111.n I

-~

NEWS FROM THE
MAJOR EVENTS OFFICE
After 11/2 years of hard work, countless negotia-
tions, and a lot of dreams, we are proud to announce
the high-flying Eagles will touch down in Crisler Arena,
Friday, November 12 at 8:00 p.m. This concert, the
only Michigan stop on their 1976 Tour almost ended
up in, the "bad news-no hall available" column, How-
ever, UM Coach Johnny Orr, voted "Coach of the
Year" by the National Basketball. Coaches Associa-
tion, turned out to be our "man of the year." In agree-
ing to re-schedule an important practice session, Orr
freed Crisler Arena, enabling us to present the Eagles
for their thousands of fans at U of M.
The Eagles, atop everyone's list of superstar
groups, have reached a pinnacle in musical stardom.
Their mellow blend of harmonies, last year brought
them the Rock Music Award for "Rock Group of the
Year." Lead singer Glen Frey, born and bred in the
local area, is anxiously looking forward to the group's
Ann Arbor debut.
Tickets are $8, $7 and $6 and go on sale tonight
at 8:00 p.m. at Crisler Arena Box Office. We felt a

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K'

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COVER FOR MEN: 1.50

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