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October 24, 1976 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-24

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Sunday, October 24, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

~Poge Sever

..

Sunday1 October 24, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Pose Sever
I I

Lack of issues takes the fight out of students

(Continued from Page 1 ) it apathy, just relaxation. I But Heidel admits that, im- "McGovern ran in a special
"Students are interested in can't see them as being active pressive as the level of student time. Young people were ready
McGovern - type issues and as they were in the 60's. The activity in the Riegle campaign for a change," recalls Heidel.
there just aren't any of those students are tied, the country may be, it is eclipsed when "The decline in student sup-
around this election," says Uni- is tired." placed in historical perspective. port this year is not so much
versity junior Cathy Zachs who Renewed interest in state and "IF THIS was 1968 or '74, due to the difference between
is co-ordinating the local Stu- local politics has been cited as and we had the social change Carter and McGovern, as to the
dents for Ford committee. an additional reason for skeletal we had then, we'd have a lot difference between 1972 and
Zachs says that although student suppdrt in the presiden- more student participation," 1976."
there are "about 350" student tial campaigns. According to says Heidel. "Now, students are CITY COUNCILMAN Jaime
volunteers on the campus Ford University graduate Gary Hei- more concerned about them- Kenworthy (D-Fourth Ward),'
campaign, only "40 or 50" of del, who is the district coordin- selves, not social change." who is coordinating strategies
those are what she terms "real ator for Donald Riegle's senate Heidel maintains it's not the between the various local Dem-
campaign workers." campaign, his organization is individual candidates which are ocratic campaign offices, sat in
"I'M VERY disappointed in composed of mostly student vol- responsible for the failure to congressional candidate Ed-
terms of student .involvement," unteers - approximately 85 draw college-level ,support, but ward Pierce's headquarters last
she complains. "I wouldn't call students, he says. a relaxed social climate. week overseeing a team of
- volunteers which primarilya
s ! consisted of middle-aged house-
1 ixotc l wives.
Smuers mix scotch, coe Kenworth said hewas
"pleased" with the level of stu-
dent participation in the Demo-
(Continued from Page 1) "I'M SURE it's (cocaine) sol- liquifying the hallucinatory tro- cratic campaigns, but nostal-'
the soluble properties of cocaine uble in alcohol," he said, "and pine alkaloid compound won't gically recalled the heightened
have been researched and cal- as far as I know, it's soluble win the smugglers any Nobel activism he met during his first
culated." in vodka." prize, let alone an admiringly political involvement.
Lawton added that dissolving "Many things are soluble in stare from a jealous chemist. "I worked in the '68 New
the powder and evaporating it alcohol and water," he continu- "I don't think it would re- Hampshire primary and what I'
back into its natural form ed. "Anyone who takes an un- quire Any expertise - by any saw there was a lot of people
woulud not modify the potency dergraduate chemistry class way," said an unimpressed incredibly motivated by the
of the cocaine, a strong nar- knows that if you can't dis- Lawton,.. ncr.ditlsoti tedh yn ths
cotic with local anesthetic prop- solve something in water, you' Added his colleague: "It's in-
erties. add a little alcohol. It's an ele- genious only in that they chang- ..':.:..'::
However, Groves suspects the ,mentary process." ed the form. If you're looking Daily Official Bulletin
drug could have been dissolved Nevertheless, both professors for a white powder, you don't
in solvents other than water. will bet their test tubes that look for liquor.".
Sunday, October 24, 1976
TV Ctr: Male Menopause, channel
W kyou make that commitment 2; 7 am
opou've got to look long range WUOM: Options in Education, 1
O m en s sp orts at giving publicity to some as- pKelsey Museum: Naomi Norman
pects of the, women's program "Greek Phases from the Boston
that we give to men's sports." Museum of Fine Arts," Kelsey Mu-
(Continued from Pale 4 ) clusive of revenue producing "I think we will be fully com- sec, 2 pin.
ing to come here free, when she sports. petitive," says Charles Harris. IConcertrchlac udy4hpme
can go somewhere else for a However, according to Gwen "As to being able to attract thei Ext Serv: Technology Assessment:
full scholarship as a freshper- Gregory, director of the office best athletes"-another element Creative Futures; Rackham, 7 pm.
of oliy cmmuicaion inWesley Foundation: Elaine Alex-
son. Two of the best girls in of policy communication in necessary in a revenue produc- ar.der, life-work planner, "Life
the country that dive with me HEW, revenue producing sports ing sport - "that may not be Work Planning Workshop," 602
(at *his summer camp) went cannot simply be excluded somethin tat may bo e Huron at state, 7:30 pm.
(at is ummr cmp)wen Reenu sprtsarepar ofsomething we'll ever be able .
to Miami. They got scholarships Revenue sports are part to do, because the University _
there."' the athletic program that would doesn't have that large a
be looked at and considered .,,W R S
While coaches and adminis- whether equal opportunities are physical education program."h
trators within the athletic de- whefere ulopotuiie"r One wonders whether the ON PA E
partmentseem tobetsolidifyi." men's basketball, football, hoc- PAPER
a commitment to very compe- What remains to be seen then key and other teams fail to
titive intercollegiate programs is just how far established pow- draw excellent athletes, year CRESSMAN
the money to finance their ers in the athletic department after year, because of the Uni- CASSARA
the mollin totoxefinancel-theirB
plans must come from another are willing to extend the al- versity's physical education
source, namely revenues from ready existing financial com- program. STEWART
football, basketball and ice- mitment to develop top notch, "I don't know if we're draw- & Selected Student Works
hockey. nationally known teams. ing the best women athletes. I
"I assume women's sports think it's possible as long as' OCT. 19-NOV. 7
It is these three sports which are going to at some time be- there are funds available," RECEPTION: Oct 20. 7-9
are the money makers as well come revenue producing," as- comments Canham. It is sound HOURS: Tu & Fri 10-6
as big spenders in the athletic serts Hunt. "I see basketball reasoning, and a businesslike Weekends, 12-6
program. and volleyball as becoming p'rojection, but one has to ask . 7643234-
The athletic department is revenue producing, possibly whether Canham would ever
now seeking to make women's within a five year period. You dare the same thing about U NION
sports comparable to intercol- might -lect a' sport to become football: it'll be a great team
legiate programs men have, ex- revenue producing. And once - if funds are available. GALLERY
First Floor, Michigan Union
He's an nearienced

ness of the youth so that they ';
were almost one big constituen-
cy. Unemployment can't do
that."
A MOMENTUM - GAINING
swing towards more conserva-
tive politics amongst the col-
lege age electorate has also
been cited as a reason for low-
profile political activism this
year. According to Katosh, 20,
per cent of the 236 students en-
rolled in the contemporary is-
sues course are working on Re-
publican campaigns. If stu-
dents are involved, some ob-
servers say, it's on a more
"peaceful" level.
Patricia Taritas, who is co-'
ordinating the second congres-
sionlal Ford campaign effort,.
'says she was surprised with the,
"nucleus of 35 or 40 students
actively working" with her on
the President's campaign.
"Last time," she said, refer-
ring to the 1972 elections, "stu-
dents screamed and hollered.
and protested but didn't get any-
thing done. This year they're
just working."
Zachs, who is orchestrating
the Ford campus effort "bas-
ically from my own room," be-
lieves that increased academic
pressure has also driven stu-
dents away from active cam,
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paigning. "I hope it's just a
passing phase," she says.
Whatever the reasons, the
evaporating student activism at
the University is apparently
part of a much larger national
picture.
According to a recently re-
leased national survey of vot-
ing habits, commissioned by the
nonpartisan Committee for the
Study of the American Elector-
ate in Washington, D. C.,
Forty-six per cent of the 150i
million voting - age Americans!
who either haven't registered
to vote or say their chances of
voting in November are slim,'
are under 35 years of age.
"But I see a brighter future,"
says Miller, "The trauma of
' the sixties; Watergate; the fail-
ure of the candidates in '72 -
that was unusual. As soon as
politics returns to normal, so
will active involvement."

ETHICS and RELIGION
WEDNESDAY LECTURES
Gonzalo Castillo-Cardenas,
Member Church and Society Movement Latin America;
World Council of Churches Program to Combat Racism;
Action-Research among Indian and Peasant communities
in Colombia
Oct. 27 "THE PEASANT-INDIAN STRUGGLE
IN COLOMBIA: How can an outsider trained in
the Social Sciences relate to it?"
Nov. 3 "WESTERN SOCIETY AGAINST THE
INDIANS IN SOUTH AMERICA: Government
Policies, Foreign Corporations and Christian
Missionaries-Threats to Indian Survival."
4:15 p.m. Wednesdays-Angel Hall, Aud. "A"
DISCUSSION with the speaker drd other faculty members
INTERNATIONALG CENTER REC. ROOM THURSDAY
NOON-brown bag lunch.
ETHICS AND RELIGION, 3204 Michigan Union-764-7442'

.::.

University Owned and
Operated Housing
Residence Hall and Family Housing
Applications Will Be Accepted for the
Winter Term 1977 Beginning November 1, 1976
Contact the Housing Information Office
1011 Student Activities Building
FOR
Up-to-Dale Information onHousing
CALL

GENERAL HOUSING INFORMATION .
FAMILY HOUSING ASSIGNMENTS . .
RESIDENCE HALL ASSIGNMENTS ..
OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING . . . . . .

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