100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 23, 1976 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, October 23, 1976

Cambodia calms down
0+£ PARIS P) -- Cambodia, after country they took over in April, well for the Communist govern-
a reign of terror that Western ,1975. ments who have diplomatic mis-

NOW SHOWING analysts believe may have caus-
ed 500,000 deaths, is growing1
SHOW TIMES: 7:30 & 9:30 daly calmer internally and starting
1,3, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30 Sat. & Sure. ony to reach out abroad, two senior
specialists in Indochina affairs
report.
Following a year and a half
of nearly total isolation, the4
country's leaders have begun a
timid campaign of increased
contact with the outside world,I
the specialists said.
ON THE BASIS of these de-
velopments they conclude that
the Cambodian Communists,
known as Khmers Rouges, now
finally feel they have the me-
chanism for controlling the
V9INTAGE
WINES
at Retail Prices,
', a.
S. University near Washtenaw
769-1744
- 1 -!

The two analysts, Western
diplomats with close ties to
Southeast Asia, requested that;
they not be identified.
The sources said that execu-
tions have almost come to a
halt after a systematic purge
aimed at elimination of all po-;
tential dissidents. The execu-
tions, famine, a malaria epi-
demic, the deliberate breakup
of families, and great move-
ments of people from the cities
to rural areas have led 'West-
ern intelligence organizations to
estimate up to a half million
deaths in a population of around
seven million.
MORE FOOD is now available,
and marriages are being per-
mitted, an indication of in-
creasing stabilization, the
sources said.l
"All the signs of change
should be seen in relative
terms," one of the informantsI
cautioned. "Cambodia is still
a paranoid situation, one of the
strangest on the globe."
The analysts confirmed re-
ports that nothing was known
of the whereabouts of Prince
Norodom Sihanouk, the former1
chief of state whose resignationj
was announced last April. Oust-
ed by a -pro-West coup in 1970,I
he was returned to office, if
only in figurehead capacity by
the Communists last year.-
SIHANOUK WAS last seen in
July, and a Chinese official re-
-ported in August that he wasj
alive, but there has been noI

i s
i
j
I '

sions in the Phnom Penh. The
few diplomats in the country
are restricted in travel and nor-
mally forced to stay in the
capital.
Information comes through
refugees, aerial photography,
and talks with diplomats with
diplomats who have been inside
+he country.
A HELICOPTER PILOT woh
flew out of Cambodia and was
questioned by Western intelli-
gence experts brought some in-
dications the country's rulers
were not those in the govern
ment but members of an un-
known 'group.
"Six or seven days later we
began to get some contradictory
information," one of the ana-
lysts said. "Sometimes figur-
ing out what's going on in!
China seems simple compared
to-looking at Cambodia."
The indications of Cambodia's
interest in widening its foreign
contacts include the visit this
week of Ieng Sary, the vice;
prime minister for foreign af-
fairs, to Romania on his first
official trip to Europe. He was
also expected to be traveling to
the United Nations in New;
York.

F U RTHE R EVIDENCE
of interest in foreign contacts
were recent invitations to the
Egyptian, Sengalese and Tuni-
sian ambassAdors in Peking to
visit Phnom Penh. There has;

.AP Photo

PD POL. ADV.
CARTER ON H E'A L T H CARE: "The quality of
health care in this nation depends largely on eco-
nomic status . . . We need a national health care
system that is sufficiet, workable and fair."
CARTER SUPPORTS mandatory national health
Sinsurance to make adequate health care a right
for all Americans.
FORD OPPOSES any comprehensive national health system
(He even vote~d against Medicare while in Congress)
VOTE FOR CARTER-For Health Care Available To All Americans

word on him since. also been a low key' attempt at
One of the informants said he ' trade negotiations with Japan
felt there- was little reason to in Tokyo.
expect that any harm had come The most unusual - gesture
Cat o aremains avastabroad was a Cambodian stand
mystery for the West, which at the annual fair of the French!
has no representatives in the Communist party newspaper
country, and probably one as l'Humanite last month.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
WASHINGTON SUMMER INTERN PROGRAM
in WASHINGTON, D.C.j
MASS MEETING
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27
7:30 PM.
NAT. SC. AUD.
I

Ronnister Johnson can afford to take his time getting to work amid surroundings like
these. The 200-year-old oak trees, covered with Spanish moss, grow on Sapelo Island in
Georgia. Their wood was once used by the pirte Blackbeard to repair his ships.
-l
Tall groun ded y sea
ofre tae'snsistr

i
E

Nieeileighbo rhood

CALL TOLL FREE...
ANY TIME!

To Order
Or Request
Literature
ILLINOIS ONLY
800-322-4400
OUTSIDE ILLINOIS
800-447-4700
* s II ds
Brrd k

O
¢
r
S
"
"
0
0
0
S
0
S
0

The AE-1 is changing the way cameras
Ca__ will be made, and the way photographers
- - take pictures. Its shutter-priority auto-
I M Cmatic exposure and sensitive silicon
photo cell tree you as never before to
The electronic system approach your subject-yet with all the
versatility that Canons more than forty
cam era that's FD lenses and multitude of accessories
changing the course of makes easily possible. To really appre-
ciate the AE-1, you have to pick it up and
photography use it. It just may change the course of
ph tg a h/___ your photography'
- Canon

HALIFAX, Canada ui - The ment - owned Christian Radich
three-masted sailing ship Era- agreed to make the trip.
wan, one of the tall ships seen BUT THE ERAWAN ran up
in New York harbor on July 4, $15,000 in unforseen pilotage
has broken up on rocks in the fees through the Great Lakes,
Canso Strait of Nova Scotia, the St. Lawrence Seaway and Can-
Transport Ministry said yester- soStrait, Havermansaid.
day. Haverman said 'it was be-
"She's gone," said a minis- lieved that these and other de-
try spokesman following a tails h!id been ironed out with
storm that swept the , area the host cities on the Great
Thursday with winds up to 40 Lakes by Operation Sail author-
miles an hour. He said only a ities in New York which organ-
small part of the hull of the ized the international sailpast
150-foot vessel was still visible. for July 4.
"But we found when we got
Thesship, built in Sweden in there that these cities had not
1947 as a Baltic trader and one: paid the pilotage fees and had
of the last wooden ships de-, no intention of doing so.
signed for commercial use, ran "The captain would never,
aground in a gale Tuesday, have taken her into the Great
night as Captain Phillip Esnos .Lakes if he'd know there was
and his crew of eight neared the no written agreement."
open Atlantic. Esnos is the "WE RAN into all kinds of
owner of the Panamanian - reg- other trouble, too," Haverman
-istered ship and used her as a ote rulIoHvra
charter vessel out of New York.said, including rigid Greatj
Lakes and seaway navigation
The ship had just comnleted regulations and one 'other
a tour of U. S. Great Lakes grounding. In Sturgeon Bay,
ports which a crewman Bob anear Algoma, Wis., he said, a
Haverman of Centerport, N.Y., local pilot "put us aground. We
said had been marred by a had to be towed off and the
"sea of red tape." Erawan sustained considerable
The Erawan and other tall damage."
ships were invited by about 15 He said the damage, 60 to 80
U. S. cities 6n the Great Lakes feet of wood torn from the keel,
to pay courtesy visits. The Era- might have contributed to the
wan and the Norwegian govern- Erawan's trouble at Canso.j

"She leaked in places she nev-
er leaked before."
After spending several weeks
in Menominee, Mich., while
lawyers for the ship and Oper-
ation Sail argled with the Great
Lakes cities about pilotage fees,
the Erawan was bailed out by
her skipper, cancelled visits to
several Canadian cities and
headed o t of the lakes for Mar-
.immnirie where Esnos had a con-
tract to charter the vessel, Hav-
erman said.
Esnos was in Montreal on
Friday to discuss his claim for
insurrance which Haverman
said might cover about 60 per
cent of the Erawan's value.
He added Esnos had told him
the Erawan was worth about
$400,000.
TALLEST DO(RS
LOS ANGELES (A) - The
world's tallest doors, 45 stories
high; are on the Vehicle As-
sembly Building at Cape Ca-
naveral, Fla., according to the
Rand McNally "Traveler's Al-
manac."
The doors, plus spaceship
launch pads and ?other exhibits
at Kennedy Space Center, are
visible on NASA-conducted bus
tours that depart 'from the in-
formation center near Titus-
ville.

" Shutter-oriority autonatc eposure
" ncredibly light weight, cmoact and
easy to use'
. instant response sensitive silicon
exposure metering
. Compact Power Wnder A for motor-
'zedseauentia' shooting

$279
" Speed te 155A auto'electronicflash
sets shutter and aperture
" Accepts all canon FO lenses for AE
operation
" Unbeatable performance at an in
beatable price

COMPETITIVELY PR ICED
SHIPPED FAST
Ol SO LIDATED 520 East Green
(WERA CEflTRES Champaign, It. 61820
[217) 359-8000

For fL.4............................................ . Add $46.00
For Power Winder A in Case ........ ...................Add $88.00
For Speedlite 155A Set w/ease ........................... Add $55.00
For Camera Case ........ .............. .. .............. Add $13.00

Iz Millis= I .

Open and World Tennis Championship.

~Canon
The electronic system
camera that's
changing the course of
photography

The AE-1 is changing the way cameras
will be made, and the way photographers
take pictures. Its shutter-priority auto-
matic exposure and sensitive silicon
photo cell free you as never before to
approach your subject-yet with all the
versatility that Canon's more than forty
FD lenses and multitude of accessories
makes easily possible. To really appre-
ciate the AL-1, you have to pick it up and
use it; It just may change the courseof.
your photography!
/ Speedlite 155A auto electronic flash
sets shutter and aperture
"*Accepts all Canon FD lenses for AE
operation
" Unbeatable performance at an un-
beatable price
ens AE-S with 1.4 Lens
$33995

" Shutter-priority automatic exposure
SLR
" Incredibly light weight, compact and
easy to use
" Instant response, sensitive silicon
exposure metering
" Compact Power winder A for motor-
ized sequential shooting
AE-1 body:
$224

AE-1 with 1.8 Le
$ 95

e

Canonet QL-17 G-11

$114

with Canolite "D"
$134.95

Cononet 28
$7995
with Canolite "D" $98.95
Flash

28
35,
50
85
135
135
200

-LENSES-
mm f/2.8... 139.95
mm f/3.5... 179.95
mm Macro . . x169.95
mm f/1.8... 159.95
mm f/3.5.. ..103.95
mm f/2.5. . .149.95
mm £74.0... 160.00

CANON 110 ED

$119.95

with Flash

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan