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October 20, 1976 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-20

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 20, 1976

Page EIght~' THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ESCH, REIGLE DEBATE

'Qr
Pl~ if o

Personal

charges

mark i
(Continued from Page 1)
for setting this type of gutter
level tone to the campaign by
his own statements and his' own1
behavior."
"He's (Riegle) constantly cry-
ing 'distortion' and not speak-
ing to the issues," Esch re-
sponded. He said only Riegle
had raised personal issues dur-
ing the debate.
AFTER THE ' TWO pledged
strong support to Israel, Riegle
mentioned a 1973 bill amend-
ment which he said was meant
to prohibit the shipment of oil
to Israel from the United States
for military or non-military pur-
poses.
"It was an outrageous amend-
ment," Riegle declared. "Only
50 people voted for it, and one
of them was my opponent, Mar-
vin Esch. It gives a hollow ring
to what was said before (by
Esch in support of Israel): I
don't understand that vote."
Many members of the audi-
ence hissed and booed in the
spirit of Riegle's charge. Esch
did 'not respond.
ESCH VISITED Ann Arbor,
earlier in the day and talked

CENTRAL STUDENT
JUDICIARY
Will Be Interviewing for Vacancies
Next Week... There Are Five Full-
Year and Two Half -Year Seats
Available.
CONTACT MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY
(3909 MICH. UNION BLDG., 763-3241)
FOR APPLICATIONS & INFORMATION

to about 50 students outside the
Michigan Union. Senator Robert
Packwood (R-Ore.) accompan-
ied him, reinforcing Esch's sup-
port for Proposal A, the ballot
referendum which would pro-
hibit sale of non-returnable con-
tainers.I
Packwood said Oregon's sim-1
ilar state law has "worked out
very, very well. Our litter in
terms of cans and bottles has
gone down, and the cost hasn't
gone up."
Esch answered questions from
students on a variety of issues,
and emphasized the more lib-
eral aspects of his record, in-
cluding his support of the Equal
Rights Amendment and his op-
position to the Vietnam war.
He also explained his support1
for the controversial B-ibom-
ber program.
"I WANT TO GIVE a future
president the option of waging
a conventional war instead of
just a missile war," he .said.
"I think the B-1 will give us
that. I don't want the country
to depend on massivq troops
overseas, with all of their po-

confrontation

litical implications."
Asked about Riegle's claim
that Eschhas made the cam-
paign personal, the Republicans
said, "I have never said any-
thing -about Mr. Riegle per-
sonally and I never will."-
Shortly before the Union ap-
pearance, Esch told The Daily
that he thought the line between
a candidate's personal and pri-
vate morality should be care-
fully considered by voters.
DURING THE debate, Esch
continued a tack he has taken
several times before - attack-
ing Riegle for voting against
final defense appropriation bills.
Last night he gave the charge
a new twist - how could Rie-
gle say he supported Israel
when he had voted against bills
that carried specific appropri-
ations for the country?
"The. defense bill was used
for several years to get mon-
ey for Vietnam," Riegle an-
swered. "'they always kept the
money bundled in there ... How
could you vote against it (the
Vietnam war) if you didn't vote
against the money for it?"

I-

SWINE FLU PERIL?

. p
b
I (
Let it happen for YOU!
i
I'LL MEET YOU in the pump- TONY-Are you a trick or a a
kin p a t c h at the witching treat?-Cleo
hour.-W. Wolf --
_ ____..__._STIEG, you got the cutest
BETSY; You'll alwavs be-witch- little pumpkin face.-K. & D.
rig me.-Sam
CASPER you give me the
spookies. Love, Wendy
PUT IN A
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDI
DEADline, noon October 29
V

Mass injection only in U.S.

GENEVA, Switzerland (A) -
America's swine flu- vaccination
rogram is not exaptly a shot
being felt around the world.
World Health Organization
WHO) officials say several
countries are presently produc-
ng swine flu vaccine and others
are prepared to import it but
------,
VINTAGE
WINES
at Reai Pie
S. University near Washtenaw
769-1744

that only the United Statesis countries mentioned by the WHO
mounting a campaign to inocu- spokesman, but the Italian gov-
late most of its citizens. ernment said it has ordered
THE WHO spokesman said pharmaceutical companies to
there have been no new swine produce three million doses by
flu cases since those at Fort November, to be used in case of
Dix, N.J., last January and thatI need.
there are no indications now that Several European countries
a worldwide epidemic is likely producing the vaccine said they
to break out. However, he prais- would use it only in case an out-
ed those countries preparing break developed or for persons
for a possible outbreak. who want to get inoculations
"'It certainly will give added from private physicians.
safety to vaccinate as many
peole s pssblepaticularly *"We don'e consider it enough'
people as possle, partic y of a threat to undertake a cam-
as this would' make it much 'p gn f m ss ac n ti ,"
easier to contain the disease paign of mass vaccination,"
should it break out, the spokes- s a it oernm
man aid.spokesman in London.
man said.
He said those producing their THE FRENCH government
own vaccine in addition to the has taken no action regarding{
United States are Britain,. Japan, swine flu. The regular flu vol-
Romania, the Netherlands, Can- untary vaccination campaign is
ada,'Australia, Belgium, West under way in France, encour-',
Germany and Yugoslavia. He aged by widespread government
said some countries apparently advertising. But it is confined
plan to import it from the United to protection against current flu
States but named only Switzer- types circulating or thought to;
land among them. be approaching Europe, whichI
ITALY WAS not among the do not include swine flu.
The University of Michigan School of Music
I and the Alumni Association
PRESENTi
WITH THE
Univ. of Wisconsin-La Crosse Collegiate Singers
FRIDAY, Oct. 22, 8 P.M., POWER CENTER, $2.50
TICKETS are available at the Alumni Association office in
I the Michigan Union, at the Information Office of the
School of Music and at the door. For further information
call (313) 764-0384

AP Photo
Bottoms up
No, this isn't a new form of yoga, it's just that the folks down in Huntsville, Alabama be-
lieve in -keeping their kitchen appliances spic 'n span. Here, an unidentified, industrious
soul gets into the job.
N Ko.rean diploats linked
to liquor, narcotics scna

UNITED STATES READING LAB
OFFERS SPEED READING COURSE
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (A) have launched an investigationI
Government officials and dip- into matters "similar to those
nats suggested yesterday that , which have come out in con-
orth Korean diplomats involv- i nection with North Korean dip-
in a Scandinavia-wide black ' lomatic representatives in other
arket liquor, tobacco and nar- Nordic countries."
tics scandal were trying to A coordinated investigation
ise money for their Commu- was launched in the Scandinavi-'
st homeland rather than for an countries after disclosures
1rsonal, capitalist profit. last spring that the North Ko-
Danish Foreign Minister Knud rean mission in Cairo, Egypt,
idersen told newsmen that the was "a smuggling center," Swe-
>rth Korean ambassador and dish Security Police Inspector
ree aides ordered expelled Ture Holmblad told newsmen
>m Denmark last week for in Stockholm.
rge-scale illegal sales of duty- HOLMBLAD said simultaneous
ee cigarettes and liquor and raids had been planned but the
shish "hardly acted for per- Danes acted ahead of schedule,
nal gain." Other officials spec- enabling the traffickers in Swe-
ated privately that the North den to "do away with evi-,
oreans, because of a financial dence."
unch at home, used black Norway on Monday accused
arket profits to help finance the North Korean ambassador
eir assigned diplomatic and ;and his three-member staff of
ropaganda activities, black marketeering more than
POLITIKEN, Denmark's big 4,000 bottles of liquor and 140,-
>cial-Liberal newspaper, said 000 cigarettes and ordered them
rth Korean Communist lead- out of the country. One diplo-
Kim II Sung "either sent us mat was also accused of of-
e students who flunked the ex- fering hashish for sale.
ms of his spy school or he Eight Norwegians were arrest-,
nsiders Denmark a kind of ' ed and five were still in jail.
isneyland where anybody can IN SWEDEN, Stockholm .o-
> as he pleases as long as lice reported the arrest of five,
is protected by diplomatic Swedish businessmen accused'
munityt" of selling liquor and aigarettes
The scandal spread to' Nor- for North Korean diplomatic
v and Sweden Monday. In personnel. One was later re-z
[lsinki, the foreign ministry lensed.
id yesterday Finnish police The same ambassador, Kil.
Jae-gyong, represents North Ko-i
rea in Norway, Sweden and
Iceland. He is based in Stock-
I holm and will no longer be al-,
lowed into Norway, Oslo police

said in aOslo.
Swedish authorities put a new
blackout on the scandal after
Kil, at a meeting yesterday
with the head of the Swedish
foreign ministry's political divi-
sion, denied accusations against
his' mission of black marketeer-
ing.
- ASKED IF POLICE) had col-
lected enough evidence to make
a case, a Swedish official said
"There are other considerations
involved," possibly meaning a
threat of political or economic
retaliation.
Observers noted that North
Korea is in debt by about $175
million to Swedish companies.
A 1975 study -by JETRO, the
Japanese 'foreign trade organi-
zation, showed that North Ko-
rea had a total $600 million
trade deficit in Western coun-
tries. Japanese businessmen at-
tributed much of this to reck-
less purchasing and unfamiliar-
ity with capitalist business and
credit.

United States Reading Lab will
offer a 4 week course in speed
reading to a limited number of
qualified people at U-M.;
This recently developed method
of instruction is the most innovative
and effective program available in
the United States.
Not only does this famous course
reduce your time in the classroom to
just one class per week for 4 short
weeks but it also includes an ad-
vanced speed reading course on
cassette tape so that you can con-
tinue to improve for the rest of your
life. In just 4. weeks the average
student should b~e reading 4-5 tirmies
faster. In a few months some stu-
dents are r e a d i n g 20-30 times
faster attaining Speeds that ap-
proach 6000 words per minute. In
rare instances s p e e d s of up to
13,000 wpm have been documented.
Our average graduate student
should read 7-10 times faster upon
completion of the c o u r s e with
marked improvement in comprehen-
sion and concentration.
For those who would like addi-
tional information, a series of free,
one hour, orientation lectures have
been scheduled. At these free lec-
tures the course will be explained
in complete detail, including class-
room procedures, instruction meth-
ods, class schedule and a special 1
time only introductory tuition that
is less than one-half the cost of
similar courses. You m u s t attend
any of the free meetings for infor-
mation about U-M classes.

4 short weeks you can read 7 to 10
times f a s t e r, concentrate better
and comprehend more.
If you are a student who would
like to make A's instead of B's or
C's or if you are a business person
who wants to stay abreast of
today's everchanging accelerating
world then this course is an abso-
lute necessity.
These free special one-hour lec-
tures will be held at the following*
times and places.
'E U-M MEETINGS

i
i
z
i
i
1

DANISH officials speculated
that North Korea's domestic
economic difficulties forced its
low - paid representatives in
Scandinavia an'd possibly else-
where to devise "untraditional"
methods to finance such activi-
ties as large propaganda adver-
tisements in local newspapers.
In the past, the North Korean
mnison in Stockholm has placed
f-11-n~ne ads hi New York news-
naners containing texts of spee-
-hes by North Korean leader
Kim I-sung.

I

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Un

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IF YOU MAILED A POSTCARD

mot,... h A I 1 V 2

TO EACH OF THE MICHIGAN DAILY'S
READER S
Telling them of your business,
or your next sale,

Wednesday, October
6:30 and 8:30

20

Thursday, October 21
6:30 and 8:30
Friday, October 22
7:30
TWO FINAL MEETINGS
Sunday, October 24
2:30 and 7:30
Monday, October 25
6:30 and 8:30
THESE MEETINGS WILL
BE HELD AT
ANN ARBOR INN
100 SOUTH FOURTH AVE.
If you are a businessman, stu-
dent, housewife or executive this
course, which took 5 years of in-
tensive research to develop, is a
musct. Youcai n read 7-10 times

I

I

I

or your group's latest project,
IT WOULD COST YOU
$3,150.00
FOR POSTAGE ALONE
YOU CAN REACH THE SAME READERS
WITH AN AD THIS LARGE FOR JUST
$5 5.86
And we'll deliver it in something
they won't throw in the wastebasket . . .
THE PAGES OF

vvnv not pain theL1MIL I
THE DAILY IS A GREAT PLACE TO:
* meet other good peope
* drink 5c Cokes
* write stories
*0'cee your name in print
*earn little money
Come on down to 420 Maynard anytime and
join the business, news, sports or photography
staffs!
GENERAL MEETING
U of M SKI CLUB
ALL SKIERS WELCOME
Discussion of Christmas
Vacation Ski Trip
Thurs., Oct. 21-7:00 p.m.
Kuenzel Room, Michigan Union
THURSDAY NIGHT Is
GN

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