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October 17, 1976 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-17

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Sunday, October 17, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PCOO, Seven

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Couples share

professorial positions

I

(Ocontinued from Page 3)
another professional colleague
always on call, always interest-
ed in what you're doing."
"When you get a good idea
and you're both in the lab,".
Ethel added, "all you have to do
is walk a few steps and tell him
about it. When it's hot, then
really good collaboration de-
velops. Whereas, if I had to wait
six hours until I go home, I
might have forgotten about it."
"And there's not just the in-
teraction between us," David
interjects, "but between us and
both our groups of post-
doctoral fellows and then their
interaction with each other, too.
They're getting broader edu-
cations in science and will be
better scientists as a result of
having been in a lab where a
variety of things are going on."
After two full years of sharing'
a position, the Jacksons arej
still trying to work the bugs out
of their arrangement. The major
problem is that each of them

ias commitments to projects terested in part-time positions.
related to their own interests, "Initially, opposition was just
wvhi-b cut into their time. a kind of conservatism - con-
"I think I've got to chose ervative in the literal sense of
ei.ts r to let go of those projects Aanting to conserve past ideas
when they're not completed or, and traditions and not be re-
to go to a regular faculty posi- :eptive to new and different
tion," said Ethel. "It doesn't kinds of things," recalls David.
make sense to call it a half- "I see no reason wh . two

I : - - .-- ". : -- --A 11 - - --I,; - - i

time position and be
85 per cent time."

working

S THE JACKSONS increase,
their own options, they are;
simultaneously tearing down,
tradition and opening tip ave-;
nues for others who are in-;
BILLIARDS
ARE SPECIAL
EVERY SUNDAY.
REDUCED RATES '
1 P.M.=6 P.M.
At the UNION t
. c

people who had the need to
work half-time might not get
together," adds Ethel. "In that
case, they might not share on
an alternative basis, but work
simultaneously. It also has real
advantages for the University
department. in these days the
departments don't have very
much money to hire new faculty.
Suppose there are two new areas
in the sciences that they '-ight,
want to represent in their de-
oartment and they have only,
one faculty position. They might
be able to hire two half-time
people, one in each of those
areas. I've heard this kind of
thing suggested by Vice-Presi-
dent (Frank) Rhodes as a sort
of direction that the University
is going to have to look to in a
long range future with tight
money.
"But I think it might be hard-
er to sell that to the University
because the University tradi-
tionally has been kind of su-
spicious of part-time employes,
in particular part-time faculty,
because they think that this
means you're not really serious

about what you're doing." Ethel to follow their husbands around.
continues, "I think it was much! They have given up academic
easier for use to convince the careers at other prestigious uni-
University, because both of us versities. But neither woman
were going to be working full- has felt as if she were sacrific-
time..That said to them that we ing her education opportunities.
cared enough about our profes- "I think to be fair, I have
sions to work full time. But compromised more than Dave-
there's really no reason why the he chose the graduate school
two women who wanted to work and the job," Ethel said. "But
part-time couldn't use the exact ue'veahd ioodnluck at every
same scheme." times. We've been doing some
In order to have the best of things not because we particu-
both professional and personal larly wanted to, but because
lives, the couples have had con- circumstances forced us to. And
stantly to compromise and re- yet, it has turned out really
evaluate their goals. well."
This predicament was par- "There is no uniform or gen-
ticularly difficult for the women, eral solution to this problem,"
because they were younger and adds David. "All you have to
not in the position, for example, be is flexible, innovative--and
to look for jobs. It was not easy lucky."
Italian Buffet
$ O .0 ALLYU
3949 C AN EATO. 5-10 p.m.
Pizza -- Lasagna - Mostaccioli - -
Veal Parmigiona -- Italian Sausage,
---Meat Balls - Chicken Caccia-
tore -& more *"
114 E. Washington
ALSO: Salad & Bread Basket ANNO AROR

Phi Beta Kappa Lecture Auspices, Alpha Chapter of Michigan
NATURE & THE TALE OF GENJI
Prof. Edward G. Seidensticker
Department of
Far Eastern Languages and Literature
Tuesday, October 19, 1976-4:10 p m.
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE
OPEN TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC

P

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DON'T WASTE
fAYOUR BREATH
SOMEPLACE ELSE... I

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Say It First in
the Classifieds.
CALL TODAY

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1

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN BANDS
PRESENT

764-0557

r"-

'76

-
FILM-
AVENUE of the AMERICAS
documentary about CHILE
Tues., Oct. 19-4 p.m.
Rm. 126 RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE
Wed., OGtt. 20 3 p.m-.
WESLEY LOUNGE-State & Huron
AVENUE of the AMERICAS is the first new documentary
feature about CHILE to incorporate recent revelations
about U.S. complicity in the overthrow of Allende. It
charts the CIA and corporation involvement in Chile's
economy which had such tragic results. Its focus on the
Popular. Unity govt., extensive footage of the coup, and
statements by the Junta leave an indefible impression. The
script write.r Charles Harman was killed during the coup
rem 40000,
CHEAP TRICK g
50c DISCOUNT ON ADMISSION
WITH STUDENT I.D.
-PLUS-
PITCHER NIGHT
COMING Mon., Oct. 18
STONEGROUND
and Monday, TWO GREAT EUROPEAN BEERS
Will Be on Tap.
516 E. LIBERTY 994-5350

t
}$
it
iy(
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i

'ATURING THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN:
a MARCHING BAND
" SYMPHONY BAND
" CONCERT BAND
a VARSITY BAND
* JAZZ BAND
featuring guest soloist DONALD SINTA, Saxophone
FRIDAY, NOV. 5, 1976-8:00 P.M.
SUNDAY, NOV. 7, 1976-2:00 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
ADMISSION $2.00, $3.00 AND $4.00
MAIL ORDERS ACCEPTED THROUGH OCT. 28

"";li

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Send Self-A
Envelope
Payment (Pay

ddressed, Stamped
With Requests and
"U. of M. Bands")
HILL BOX

TO BANDORAMA '76
1273 SCHOOL OF MUSIC
ANN ARBOR, MICH. 48109
OFFICE OPENS OCT. 29

,r

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_.

Al

TheTeachings of Jose Cuervo-

//

UNITED STATES READING LAB
OFFERS SPEED READING COURSE
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

e

is

h

United States Reading Lab will
offer, a 4 week course in speed
reading to a limited number of
qualified people at U-M.
This recently developed method
of instruction is the most innovative
and effective program available in
the United States.
Not only does this famous course
.reduce your time in the classroom to
just one class per week for 4 short
weeks but it also includes an ad-
vanced speed reading course on
cassette tape so that you can con-
tinue to improve for the rest of your
life. In just 4 weeks the average
student should be reading 4-5 times
faster. In a few months some stu-
dents are r e a d i n g 20-30 times
faster attaining s p e e d s that ap-
proach 6000 words per minute. In
rare instances s p e e d-s of up to
13,000 wpm have been documented.
Our average graduate student
should read 7-10 times faster upon
completion of the c o u r s e with
marked improvement in comprehen-
sion and concentration.
For those who would like addi-
tional information, a series of free,
one hour, orientation lectures have
been scheduled. At these free lec-
tures the course will be explained
in complete detail, including'class-
room procedures, instruction meth-
ods, class schedule and a special 1
time only introductory tuition that
is less than one-half the cost of
similar courses. You m us t attend
any of the free meetings for infor-
mation about U-M classes.
These orientations are open to

4 short weeks you can read 7 to 10
times f a s t e r, concentrate better
and comprehend more,
If you are a student who would
like to make A's instead of B's or
C's or if you are a business person
who wants to stay abreast of
today's everchanging accelerating
world then this course is an abso-
lute necessity.
These free special one-hour lec-
tures will be held at the following
times and places.
U-M MEETINGS

Wednesday, October
6:30 and 8:30

20

Thursday, October 21
6:30 and 8:30
Friday, October 22
7:30
TWO FINAL MEETINGS
Sunday, October 24

Fi

re is
ie.'

2:30
Monday,
6:30

and 7:30
October
and 8:30

25

I.

THESE MEETINGS WILL
BE HELD AT -
ANN ARBOR INN
100 SOUTH FOURTH AVE.
If you are a businessman, stu-
dent, housewife or executive this
course, which took 5 years of in-
tensive research to develop, is a
must. You can read 7-10 times
faster, comprehend more, concen-

f .
OF MIN I CA
vil 4!T j i i'll j

IA~-I w vm t - . -!5^ - -

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11

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.T____ ':". .

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