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October 17, 1976 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-17

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Sunday, October17, 1976 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October' 17, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

onelp FIVA

rag rive;

a

SUNDAY MAGAZINE

PERSPECTIVES

Confessions

of

a

Bloom field

caviar

eater

By CYNTHIA HILL Wherever she is, I'll bet she's 45 minutes after randomly f I marched on Washington, I
come into her own. The rest of punching a button. marched on Chicago, I marched
T WISH I KNEW where Debbie us wear the invisible brand of Or, as recently as last Sun- on the Huron Valley National
Black went. I would like to what an acquaintance sneering- day, my helplessness as the Bank when, twelve weeks into'
thank her: she braved social ly referred to as our "class sewers in my house backed my first term, I had overdrawn:
obloquy for our sake. origins." Debbie alone has been up. I poured myself glass after my account. Those little slips
In our posh suburban high redeemed. glass of vodka-and-tonics, awash of paper I had signed so effort-
school, she wore the same pair Even after five years, the: with mute mortification, as my lessly represented real money
of jeans two days in a row question still haunts us: landlord made bawdy comments - specifically, the cold, hard!
while the rest of us rose with "Yes, but where were you!about flushing tampons down cash I had sweated for all sum-
the sun to agonize over our from ... originally?" people in- the john. Merciful unconscious- mer at a local newspaper of-:
wardrobe ("But I can't wear a sist over drinks, joints, or class ness, and later a very painful fice. Or, at least, that's what I
plaid skirt! I wore a plaid skirt notes. (It is easier for an out-migraine, overtook me. the bank people told me after
Tuesday!") Sometimes-bedad! of-stater to get residency than' they slapped me back to con-
- she even wore the same for a Michigander to become QHED A TEAR for shattered sciousness.
sweater. a bona fide Ann Arborite.) idylls. We had lived a life But, what was worse, my class
While the rest of us arduous- Some of us still blanch at as archaic and ill-starred as the origins could be tagged on a
ly rolled, ironed or curled our the query, some of us equiv Romanovs. Our innocene dark night from a mile away.';
hair nightly - physical pain no cate, and some of us even lie.rippe away, along As a cub reporter for The Daily,i
barrier - hers cascaded in dish- But a few of us look the ques-, bucks stashed in our back pock- I once watched in stupefied
water blond waves over her! tioner straight in the eye, un- c dalmost immedlimity as we horror as Student Government:
shoulders. She wore no make-|abashed, and announce in sha-' crossed e city ms Council President Lee Gill -A
up, a fact I heartily begrudged ky but defiant tones: "I'm from And a dandy bunch we were, a skinny, black ex-con from
each evening as I dutifully peel->{ Bloomfield Hills." 'too - WASPs and JAPs, all of Chicago - leaned across the
ed off my false eyelashes, along, A stunned hush' usually set-,us - as we tooled into town council table during a meet-'
with my real ones, which tend- tles over the room, followed by with our graduation Accutrons I ing, and hissed at a long-haired
ed to stick to the glue. (I grate- , hoots of derisive laughter, know- and going-away gift cars.- j radical-about-town:
fully abandonned this ritual ing grins, or a cold shoulder Although the four-year trip, "Why don't you take your
when the whites of my eyes and a scornful snicker. for many of us, was meant to! fucking pony tail back to Bloom
broke out in little red spots.) It's not easy being from be an all-expense-paid junket, 1field Hills!"
Debbie Black blew whatever Bloomfield. There is no sym- many of us paid our dues in -
chance she had for social re- pathy for the sheltered daugh-I culture shock. Gill cast an ominous glance.
habilitation the day after the ters of the upper-crust bpur- Of course, the year was 1971, at me as well, and I knew my'
Kent State murders, when she geoisie. and the campus was still re- cover was blown. I dropped my
scrawled "Four down - How I listen, awestruck, as my verberating from the last waves pencil, and a tear or two glis-
many more to go?" across the friend Stephanie tells me of the of radical activism. And while tened in the corner of my eyes.
blackboard of our American his- hassles of the Bronx, or as Mike many of the campus radicals How had he known? (It was
tory class.- tells me of the hardships of the quietly unsealed envelopes con- y
We thought she was weird. ghetto. But eyes glaze and taming checks from Bethesda.
yawns are stifled when I try to or Manhattan, few admitted it
convey the revulsion and hor-' unless their arms were twisted. October 20-24
ror I felt when, at twenty, I It was a time when you
took out the garbage for the couldn't cross the Diag without
first time. knowing seventeen differentU
Or the blank confusion and handshakes and four cliches
panic I experienced when, as (Usually "Right on!" "Wha's
a wet-behind-the-ears freshwom-1happenin' " "Off the pigs!" and
an holding an armload of gri-'"Be cool.") My consciousness'

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my coat, a discarded relic from
my mother, had been thrown
across a table. I had forgotten
to rip out the "Saks" label.)
BUT I DIDN'T give up. Not
yet. While old school chums
married up-and-coming business-
men, or put the boy-next-door
through med school, I dropped
out of school. I threw myself
with passionate abandon into'

banded together in fraternities like too much
and sororities for solidarity - I hacked off
averted their eyes when they hair that night.
saw me. Some didn't recognize equal amount of
me. I was safe in anonymity. a razor, and, les
Or so I thought until last spring.!I watched it squi
As I discussed my latest Ifbathtub drain.
blighted love with a friend, I I live alone
slouched back into an easy my burden ins
chair, and adjusted my flan-' much like Hest
nel shirt. Peter got a beer from her adulterous
the fridge g .at newspapers,
He hesitated before pulling walls with Dali

of a lady." years have passed, however.
a half-yard of I'm a little older, a little sad-
SI hacked an der, and much more penurious.
ff my legs with If you should meet someone
ss dramatically,' at a party, and his face flushes
iggle down the and he swallows deeply when
now, and bear you ask him where he's from,
nowtand bar pursue the question no further.
solitarynshame, if he should sheepishly confess,
Aer rynne and "I'm ... uh ... from northern
'A". I don't look Detroit," smile indugently. Ask
I decorate my him what his major is. He'll
and Rousseau !thank you for it.

torrid romances with men from the tab off his Budweiser. "I've
the wrong side of the tracks. always felt uneasy drinking
I would. do anything - any- beer around you."
thing. I tell you - to remove' "Huccome?" I asked, pinning'
the iniquitous blot from my up my frizzy hair, newspaper-'
past. style, with a pencil.
I lived in a co-op. I became "You always seemed . . ." he'
a vegetarian. And, driven sub- paused. "I hate to use the
consciously by the Bloomfield word, but you always seemed;
maxim - "Achieve! Achieve!"--
- I did it on dexadrine, caf-
feine. I swallowed codeine for
my headaches, and librium for'! GROU
my nerves. I had screwdrivers
for breakfast, Jack Daniels for C
lunch.I "PIIPTO A

. aa.a .r acca a. uac
nt+into Xi'vnnnt

prints. Ekxcept for backed-up
sewers, the Real World rarely
intrudes.

Former Daily editor Cynthia

But an inexplicable nostalgia Hill pilns to jorget her back-
overwhelms me when I catch ound and adopt a Bohemian
a whiff of Dior perfume in the .
air, and my left hand twitches 'ife-stle in Fzcrope-s soon as
spasmodically for my checkbook ' e scrapes some n o n e y to-
when I pass Jacobson's. Five gether.
-'

t

P ON LATIN AMERICAN ISSUES
ONCIENCIA BORICUA present
)?CO--n d tl f Hhieratinn" wifth

I even got arrested. (By the
way, the police do follow up on
those unpaid parking tickets.)
I am now a woman with a
police record.
At last, I figured, I had ex-
piated my guilt. My Bloomfield
confreres - who had largely
-----.--

ri JItPIUR I CANI- INGER- I.J ICIPIOERIICOIMOII
ROY B ROWvvN
PUERTO RICAN SINGER-COMPOSER

A

ANN ARBOR

4
i

a concert at the ARK, 1421 Hill
on Oct. 19 Tues. at 8 P.M.
$2.50 donation-includes refreshments
Information call: 764-7442
Known nationally and interna-
tionally for his folkloric and
protest music, Roy Brown has
stated, "my music is a new ex-

(Continued from Page 3)
In the 21st dynasty (around
1,000 B.C.), high priests re-
wrapped all the previously em-
balmed kings and queens, and
reburied them. Tiy, and two
other unidentified mummies,
were sealed in an antechamber
in the tomb of another pharoh,_
Amenhotep II. Before it was
robbed, that chamber held
treasures to be passed with
that pharoah into the afterlife.
There they lay until 1898,
when the threedunnidentified
mummies were discovered by
G. Elliot Smith, a British ana-
tomist. Believing the them to
be historically insignificant,,
Smith photographed the mum-
mies, recorded information
about them, and re-sealed the
chamber. The photographs
showed that one mummy,
known only as "the eider lady,"
was buried with her left hand
upon her chest, as if holding
something.
"This was. unusual," said
Harris. In ancient Egypt, wom-
en were buried with their arms
extended and their hands be-
tweens their legs - for modes-
ty's sake.
A left hand crossed upon the
chest normally was a position
reserved for royal men. So, the
archeologists reasoned, the
"elder lady" must have been
a woman of some importance.
It was upon Wente's sugges-
tion that a multidisciplinarv
team of eight, doing research
in Egypt, set off in search of
Tiv, hoping that the unidenti-
fied mummy would turn out
to be the fabled oneen.
IN HER OWN TIME. Tiy was
influential upon the rulers
of Egypt, who then held most
of the known world.
During the 18th dynasty, she
was a comnoner who married
Amenhotep III, and quicklv be-'
came his favorite wife. He was
reputed to be one of the great-
est pharoahs of the New King-
dom in Egypt.
As queen, Tiv was reputed
to be a woman of great forti-
tuide and determination, influen-
tial during her husband's reign.
Some. historians believe she
may also have been influential
during the reign of her son, the
heretic king, Akenaton.
She is also thought to be the
grandmother of King Tut-Ankh-1
Amon.
Tut-Ankh-Amon is the only
piharoabwhose tomb was virtu-
ally undisturbed by grave rob-
bers. It was found nearly intact?
in 1922.

my T-shirts and levis, I faced was raised: I chiselled off the
a threatening, anonymous line last vestiges of Yardley make-
of dormitory washing machines. up, let my hair grow long and
Each had ardial marked with kinky, invested in my first pair
strange, arcane terms ("Spin of bib overalls, and added sev-
cycle, delicates"). My fearful eral new words to my speaking'
presentiments came true when vocabulary, most of which cre-
I hauled out grey sheets, grey ated a mild disturbance at
T-shirts, and grey underwear i home.
Introdudtion to Kundalini Yoga
AS TAUGHT BY
W.,vrmi Rudrananda & Michael Shoemaker
BEGINNERS CLASSES EVERY
MONDAY !WEDNESDAY iFRIDAY
at 5:30 P.M.
Rudranando Ashram
640 OXFORD 0 995-5483
Daily Classifieds
Get Results
- --- -------- -

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Sine CIVIC THEATRE
b}, Tennessee Williams
Tickets Available at the Lydia Mendelssohn box
office in the Michigan League. 663-1085
HOURS: Mon., Oct. 13 & Tue., Oct. 19, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m
Wed.-Sat., Oct. 20-23, 10 a.m. to Showtime
Sunday, Oct. 24, 3 p.m. to Showtime

pression meant to agitate . . . mobilize . . . educate our
people for the daily struggle against the conditions of our
lives. I am responding to the times we live in and my music
must reflect this feeling."

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A MUSH
RICH IN
UAC MUSH

CCAL MASTERPIECE
' LEGAND AND FANTASY
KET/MM Productions, Inc.
PRESENTS

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be

0

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sue .
o

Thanksgiving
Break
Savings!

CAMELOT
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
November 4, 5, 7, 10, 11, 12, 13, 1976
evening performances 8:00 p.m.
(matinee Nov. 7, 2:00 p.m.)
TICKETS: $4.00, $3.50, $3.00
CAMELOT TICKET ORDER FORM
,PLEASE ENTER MY ORDER FOR:
Wednesday-Thursday (circle date) 4, 10 11. $3.50 - center
orchestra and balcony/$3.00-side orchestra and baicony.
.. ... tickets at $....for total of $.....1
Friday, Saturday, Sunday (circle date) 5, 7. 12, 13-7 matinee.
E $4.00-center orchestra and balcony/$3.50-side orchestra and ''
balcony..........tickets at $ ....... for total of $......
NAME ................. . .....PHONE .................
ADDRESS......................................
CITY......................STATE..................... ZIP
Mai order with self-addressed stamped envelope, with check
made payable to "UAC," to: MUSKET, Michigan Union, 530
S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
Phone 763-1107 or 995-2073 for reservations or further information
Tickets also available at Ticket Central, Hill Auditorium;
Jacobson's: Liberty Music Shop s
ANN A UIiUW [1131CCCI
TONIGHT in MLB
JEAN VIGO
Jean viso died in 1934 at the age of 29 leaving only two feature
films, yet his work is continually ranked among the world's
greatest cinematic achievements. Program notes will be available.

4

$499

'Jo

INCLUDES. Choice of Potato,
Salad Bar
Bread Basket

'

3411 Wasbtenow
$

is,

TRAVEL OFFICE
2nd floor Union
OPEN M-F 10-4
CALL 763-2147

I

Available Monday Thursday

Basra N1°°

NEW YOLRK

qQN)

t
PHILA DELPH i 1
WA6SHN 6TD0N tiE.
LIMITED SPACE. DEADLINE OCT. 22

TOMORROW NIGHT!

ZERO DE CONDUITE
(ZERO FOR CONDUCT)
(JEAN VIGO, 1933)
L'ATALANTE
(JEAN VIGO, 1934) COMPLETE SHOW 7 ONLY
Banned in France until after World War IIL ZERO DE CONDUITE
is the story of a boarding school and a rebellion of the students
aaginst repressive rules. Lindsey Anderson made IF directly from
Vigo's film and yet Vigo's remains better. Perhaps the funniest
and most humane movie about children ever made.
L'ATALANTE concerns the turbulent honeymoon of a barge
captain (Jean Daste) and his peasant wife (Dta Parlo) on his
barge L'Atalante. The best qualities of still photography are
woven into a very sophisticated, sensual film poem. Absolutely
stunning. Music by Marice Jaubert. French with subtitles.
Maya Deren-the woman who
remade avant garde film making
MAYA DEREN FESTIVAL
9:15 ONLY
No other filmmaker made more of a contribution to avant-garde
cinema than Maya Deren. Throughout the 40's and 50's she
made lucid, poetic films that ispired an entire wave of experi-
nental filmmakers. She established the Creative Film Foundation
which supported, among others, Stan Brakhage and Robert
Breer. No true film lover can afford to miss this collection of her
best work. Porgram notes will be available.
Ann Arbor's film co-op's own
D AkA C1A A ki r% IA lI

yU
SATYAJIT RdAY'S 1970
DAY & NGTIHE FORST
The first part of Ray's Calcutta trilogy, this filrm follows four friends
who drive off for a runaway holiday. Each finds somrething different:
one a brief romance with a peasant; another, the love of his ife- an-
other, more of an emotional experience than he bargained for. A
lyrical, visually-satisfying film with ramifications for modern Indian
society.
* CINEMA GUILD IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR MEMBERSHIP-
INQUIRE AT TICKET DESK *
TUlES: Orson Wells' TOUCH OF EVIL
TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
CIN MA G~lD7:00 &, 905 Admission: $1.25
JEAN COCTEAU'S 1946
( BEAUTY &THE BEAST
A.iulysunnIedto fte rvrilsoyo euytmn

Alicia de Larroeha, Pianist
Hill Auditorium-8:30
Music of Mozart, Rachmaninoff, Turina
Tickets from $3.50-$8.50 at Burton Tower (hours below) and
at Hill Aud. box office from 7 p.m tonight until concert time.
, T1f V .I'JV

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