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October 12, 1976 - Image 13

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-12

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. THE MICHIGAN DAILY
A rts ~~~Tuesday Octoer t r anety 12, 1976
U '5

Page Five

U' Philharmonia lively

BEETHOVEN SERIES OPENER

By KAREN PAUL
IQ ESPONDING to their new conductor,
Clark Suttle, the University Philharmonia
Orchestra last Thursday performed with
more enthusiasm than it has in years. Though
the orchestra is made up of the School of
Music's less experienced players, their
spirit and musicality made up for their lack
of exacting technique.
The lively program in Hill Auditorium be-
gan with Wagner's Prelude to Die Meister-
singer Von Nurnberg. The brass and string
sections pliyed with surprising unity. The
concertmaster could have used more sup-
port from his violin section, however.
The orchestra responded to Suttle's baton
with proper lightness for Haydn's Symphony
No. 92. The strings had some ensemble prob-
lems, but played earnestly. A full, clear
horn sound and mellow bassoon tone en-
hanced the performance.

SUTTLE'S artistry was evident in his ren-
dition of Rimsky - Korsakov's Capriccio Ees-
pagnol. The vigorous opening displayed the
orchestra's ability to play with a strong,
united sound. The many soloists featured
throughout the colorful work - clarinet,
flute, harp, violin, horn and English horn -
per formed with agility and beautiful tones.
A delightful Spanish flavor was provided by
a precise percussion section, and the violins
sang melodiously,
The main problem Suttle had was in
keeping the orchestra together in fast, tech-
nical passages. Because this was the first
concert of the season, however, the prob-
lem can be solved.
Suttle, who conducted the entire concert
from memory, modestly replied to compli-
ments after the concert, "I hope the rest
of the concerts go as well." A good guess is
that they will.

Guareri
By SUSAN BARRY others, invoked many c
spiritual implications of
HE G U A R N E R I Quar- fact.
tet opened its series of The Scherzando vivace
Beethoven's string quartets Sat- plified Beethoven's mast
urday night at Rackham with the scherzo. The animate(
an absolutely flawless perform- quality was attained %
ance of three of Beethoven's lightness that was not su
most diverse compositions. with the introductionc
The quartet, consisting of vio-more somber episode i
lihists Arnold Steinhardt and movement.
John Daley, violist Michael In the Finale the melod
Tree, and cellist David Soyer emerged distinctly as i
distinguished each piece with a casually echoed back and
disparate interpretation which among the various instru
emphasized their own versatili- This brought the firstd
ty as well as their complete to a smooth and unified
mastery of the. ensemble form. THE SECOND quartet,I
T'e rnrst quarret, Op. 127 in No. 3 in D Major, prese
E-flat major, was the most high- contrast with its simple
l-stylized and interpretatively more poetic texture. The
difficult of the three, as it was ing Allegro was elegantl
one of the last five of Bee- ple with a bittersweet n
thoven's string quartets. In the line that was like a lon
opening Maestoso - Allegro, the poem.
Guarneri achieved all the as- If the Allegro was a
tounding precision that the vig- poem, then the followingE
orous movement required. The te con moto was an eleg
timing was particularly precise, phrasing flowed as sr
while yet retaining a fairly spon- and richly as an image
taneous quality. Tennvson's "In Memn

EMU AUDIENCE ENTHUSED:

Quartet:o
of the sidered one of his greatest gressio
f that works, at the time it was first not un
performed the piece demonstra- ary the
exem- ted great promise for the de- The,
ery of veloping composer. er and
itha ry THE FINAL performance, Op. early
ubdued 59 in E minor, No. 2 varied from o
of the the first two mainly in tonality THE
in the' and intensity. The Allegro was Presto
much more somber than it was ly pun
ic line inthepprevious, quartets and it
it, was was punctuated by the dynam- Altho
Sforth s i staccato chords that are often quarte
oth 3associated with Beethoven'stservat
quartet Ninth Symphony. The second hardly
close theme was more melodic and by to
. the repeated contrasts evened conven
nted a out into a rounded binary form. Beetho
r and In the Molto adagio, several tive ge
open- distinct individual melodies, By1
y sim- ! played simultaneously, were ~
nelodic melted together so expertly that
tg love.
this movement most beautifully
love emphasized the Guarneri's per-
Andan- fection of blend. The juxtaposi-
y. The tion of irregular chromatic pro-
zoothly
from r
riam.F U CAN DRIVE
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their ACAR
ed and 4
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ons produced a texture
like that if a contempor-
eme.
Allegretto was a bit light-
the liveliness of the trio
transcended the darkness
first theme.
FINALE was a spirited'
with a strong and sharp-'
ctuated rhythm.
ough the quality of thisj
t was questioned by con-'
ives of the period, it could
be described as radical,
day's standards. Further-1
it is this deviance from
tional standards that set
oven apart as an innova-
enius.
playing three such dis-'

tinctly different quartets from
separate periods of Beethoven's
career, the Guarneri Quartet
achieved a disunity that was
interesting in its contrasting
forms.
This pattern will be repeated
in the next concert which will
be presented Friday, November
5. Although this concert has
been sold out there is an en-
core performance scheduled for
November 6, which will feature
Op. 18, No. 5, Op. 59, No. 1
and Op. 130 with Grosse Fuge.
And if the excellent degree of
musicianship presented in Sat-
urday night's concert is to be
maintained, the next perform-
ance should be well worth at-
tending.

Versatile

Sege.
By JIM SHAHIN
ROCK 'N ROLL return
Michigan Friday
Bob Seger came home.
Unrestrained and on hi
turf, Seger tumbled Ez
Michigan University's E
Field House on its ear. L
sudden explosion, he an
Silver Bullet Band hit-an
over rock's pretentions. N
ter, no smoke, no extrav
costuming, no painted spe
Seges performance der
ed judgement on its own t
From Natbush to Ka
du, Seger's brand of D
City - Ann Arbor rock i
and finally becoming rec
ed as the' honest and ex
expression it always has
About time. A decadec
bums behind him, and the
Music Awards nominates
as "best 'new talent."
BOB SEGER took a
command following an a
ture in boredom by a thir
Kiss-type band called
Leather - enamored mac
with all the threat of a
Sabbath burp, Starz rem
even the forces of doom,
they no doubt mancy
selves patterned after.
"Natbush City Limits"
menced Seger's part o
show with a strength
showcased the impressive

led to
night;
s own
astern

comes home
ability of this dedicated per- ments, if any, leaving love, and
former. Grabbing the crowd even leaving self. "Turn the
with an unbridled energy, "Nat- Page," with its shadowy music
bush" was riveting. It pounded and the quiet refrain "There I
and thrashed, not letting go, go again" reveals an inner Se-
until everybody was up and ger to us, and it haunts him.

Bowen clapping in time to the song. Concluding his set with the
ike Muddled at first, the soundmotor - running "Katmandu,"
d his became more clear as the night Seger returned with a no-brakes
ad-ran went on. Seger's set was rep- version of "Rosalee," and "Let
o glit- resentative of his lineage. it Rock," which highlighted the
'agantW featring a fevtunes hardest hitting rock 'n roll gui-
akers off his yet to be released tar work since Dick Wagner
mand- NightbMoves LP, he also dipped and Steve Hunter's collabora-
terms.sway back for rollickin' rendi- tion on the intro to "Sweet
tman- tions of ,Heavy Music," and Jane" off Lou Reed's Rock 'n;
etroit Ramblin', Gamblin' Man."All Roll Animal album. Incessant
s fast were done in the finest tradi- and biting with the sharpened
ogni-on of good-time, shake-yer- fangs of total absorption, it
ogi-ass rock 'n roll.naldtenrstoheai.
citing SEGER didn't disappoint; 'he nailed the nerves to the nadir.
been. laved what the audience came Well, you can't just dump
Rock to bear. "Travellin' Man" slid peaking rockers, so Seger was
hiR into "Beautiful Loser" the srme obligated to return once again
way it does on his recent live to center stage. His second en-
release. Although "Loser" suf- core was a credible, if anti-
stage fered from over-work -- it lack- climatic "Lucifer."
adven- ed snontaneity and sounded Looking back, it was a most
'-tevarni~hpwd - "Travelin' Man" okn'ak twsams
~d-rate aihri- TaenMn welcome homecoming.
Starz. so"jnd'' tke he meant it. Con-w mig.
hismo 5str ±' ""'ren't too tight on it,
Black 91"' '- music a little room
eaned to str "h out. We have it
which "Turn the Page" had the
them- feeling of an echo. As though all together!
Seger was listening to himself
com- while he sang. Seger's composi- P1N BALL,
f the tion's revolve around the idea: BILLIARDS
that of mobility: leaving restraints,
dur- making short-time committ- Bo L NG

TUE ADAGIO that followed
flowed extremely smoothly and
was softly emphasized with a
lightness that characterized the
Guarneri's interpretations of the
more challenging passages'
throughout the evening. The
subtle tone inflections in the
theme variations of this move-
ment were particularly remark-
able in that the composer was
totally deaf at the time he con-
ceived of the piece. This move-
ment, more than any of the

The musicians themselves
thoroughly engrossed in
performance as they dipp(
nodded with each drr
punctuation.
The second Allegro w
tremely brief and thec
Presto was much more
than the preceding move
This quartet, the briefest
three, was one of the firs
ten by Beethoven at the
of the eighteenth centur
though it is not generall

TICKETS GO ON SALE THURS., OCT. 14

In cooperation with
Major Events Office
and'UAC. TICKETS
$5.50, $4.50,
$3.50 at Michigan
Union Box Office
10 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Schoolkids and both
Discount Records.
') NFORMATION
763-1107.I
-I
Oct. 123
Hill Add
Late comers will not
be seated during
performance,

r
ir
y
1
1
ir ,
I
F

L

Why not join the DAILY?
THE DAILY IS A GREAT PLACE TO:
* meet other good people
f drink 5c Cokes
0 write stories
* see your name in print
0 earn a little money
Come on down to 420 Maynard anytime and
join the business, news, sports or photography
staffs!
BETTE DAVIS in
LITTLE FOXES
Davis and Herbert Marshall star in this fasci-
natingly morbid account of inter-family treach-
ery and ugly greed in a small southern town
about 1900. William Wyler's restless camera,
Davis' taut acting, and Dorothy Parker all add
to the film's powerful impact.
WED: Bergman's ALL THESE WOMEN
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT at OLD.ARCH. AUD.
7:00 & 9:05 Admission $1.25
93

T T T T T T T T T T T T
f 1 f 1 1 A. f 1 l J. l . .i . I . f l .ri.

At the
UNION

the university of michigan artists and craftsmen guild
invites you to an exhibition and sale of ceramics,
fibers, graphics, jewelry, paintings, and sculpture
by 75 guild members
saturday, oct. 16 8 am to 6 pm
sunday, oct. 17 12 noon to 6 pm
grounds of community high school, across from the
farmers market-In ann orbor
-TONIGHT!-
DAVID ESSEX and RINGO STARR
ROCK-N-ROLL DOUBLE
THAT'LL BE THE DAY
(Claude Whatham, 1974) 7 ONLY
Highly-acclaimedfilm based onthetrue story of the rise to
fame of a British Rock group, here called the Stray Cats
with super-guitarist Jim Maclaine played by real-life rock star
David Essex. "The sonudtrack uses '60's music the way
AMERICAN GRAFITTI dide. THAT'LL BE THE DAY has the
feeling of rock ballad."-Allen Howard, Hollywood Reporter,
With Bingo Starr, Rosemary Leach, Keith Moon, Billy Fury.
STARDUST
(Mchael Apted, 1974) 9 ONLY
This sequel to THAT'LL BE THE DAY continues the adven-
tures of Jim Maclaine. The songs, mannerisms and events
swirling around him are vastly similar to a Beatles biography.
"stands glitteringly on its own as a requiem to the rocking
'64's. It is an ambitious and engrossing movie."-Charles
Champlin, L.A. Times. David Essex, Keith Moon, Adam Faith,
Larry Hagman.,
$1.25, DOUBLE FEATURE $2.00I
AUD. A ANGELL HALL

- - - - - - - -_ .- -

sponsored by the Office of Ethics
and Religion and Canterbury House
LAST LECTURES
Several Michigan Professors have been
asked to prepare a lecture as if it were
the last lecture they would give - to
consider what they feel would be most

I
i

important to say.

m

Wednesday, October 13th
PROF. ALFRED MEYER
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Wednesdays, 4 to 5 p.m.
Auditorium A, Angell Hall
NEXT WEEK: PROF. HENRY K. SKOLIMOWSKI
WEDNESDAY, October 20th
It Pays to Advertise in The Daily
Put the DAILY

NEWS FROM THE
MAJOR EVENTS OFFICE
Hope all the survivors of the Steve Goodman!
Vassar Clements concert have recovered from that
fantastic evening of music. Steve Goodman's ver-
satility, personality and talent combined to create
a stunning performance that left the sold out
Power Center audience standing and cheering for
more. Steve returned with Vassar Clements and
his band and then thrilled an ecstatic aIudience by
bringing on his good friend John Prine who was
passing through on 'his way. to Massey Hall in
Toronto. Everybody was having such a fine old
time that we moved right on to Mr. Flood's Party
where proprietor Ned Duke hosted the party and
later it all moved on to the Pretzel Bell where
Vassar and his band were jamming with The RFD
Boys. Linda and David Sigland, operators of The
ARK, joined us with Michael Cooney who had
finished up at The ARK, and it was old home
week with John and Steve who were first intro-
duced in Ann Arbor by The ARK.
One of the hottest acts in the country, George
Benson, blazes into Hill Aud. tomorrow night for
a concert. Opening the program at 8 p.m. will be
David Pomeranz, and good seats are still avail-
able at the Michigan Union Box Office from 11:30
a.m. until 5:30 p.m. and at the door beginning at
6:30.
Folks nearly wore down the tile in the Michigan
Union Lobby queing up for Judy Collins tickets
last week. We give alot of thought and attention
to expediting things so people can move right
along once the tickets go on sale. If you ever
have any ideas on ways to improve the opera-
tion, feel free to ring us up or come by and discuss
it with us.

TAMA
PERSON!
BW, STAPLE.
M NANY "'
WAYII"
/f 'r

I

00VMOXY
"Mercury Recording Artists" L
-PLUS-
LADIES NIGHT
r-I ALL LADIES GET FREE ADMISSION

Why wait until the afternoon to catch up
on what's happening in the world when the

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